This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Request for agreement signed by the Chief of Air Force, Air Marshal Leo Davies, and Young Diggers’ Dog Squad (YDDS) Chairman of Directors on 10 August 2018'.

2
robert.chipman Digitally signed by robertchipman 
Date: 2018 07 16 18:21:28 +10'00'
BRIEF FOR CAF (THROUGH DCAF):
MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING WITH YOUNG DIGGERS’ DOG SQUAD –
ARRANGEMENT OF TIME FOR SIGNATURE

Branch: DGCHAP-AF
Reference: B1971473
Due Date:  Discretionary
Recommendations:
That you:
(a)
Note your earlier agreement for commencement of a six-month trial of the RAAF 
Workplace Welfare Dog Program across Air Force under the sponsorship of the Air 
Force Chaplain Branch.
(b)
Note the preparedness of the executive management of the Young Diggers’ Dog 
Squad to co-sign a Memorandum of Understanding with Air Force to establish the 
RAAF Workplace Welfare Dog Program.
(c)
Note the change in scope of locations for placement of dogs with Chaplain handlers at 
Air Force Bases.
(d)
Agree to the change in scope for locations for placement of dogs with approved 
Chaplain handlers.
(e)
Agree to a date and time for co-signing of the Memorandum of Understanding with 
an authorised representative of the Young Diggers Dog Squad in your office.
Background
1.
Enclosure 1 is the original brief proposing a six month trial of the RAAF Workplace 
Welfare Dog (WWD) Program that you approved in Dec 17, with dogs to be trained by the 
Young Diggers’ Dog Squad (YDDS) and placed at three Air Force establishments, 
Edinburgh, Williamtown and the Canberra area.
2.
Enclosure 2 is the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), now ready for signing 
between Air Force and YDDS to set the terms and conditions for conduct of the six-month 
trial of the RAAF WWD Program.
Key issues
3.
Since approval, progress has been impeded by the requirement for a Memorandum of 
Understanding (MOU) between Air Force and YDDS to legally constitute terms and 
conditions of the program.  Development of the MOU was prepared in consultation with 
SOLS-AFHQ staff and referred to the executive management for consideration and 
agreement.

3
4.
As a result of the s47F
 
s47F
, and the consequent ‘changing of the guard’, the MOU stalled.  The MOU, with all 
its terms and conditions, was agreed to at a meeting of the YDDS Directors on Wednesday, 
27 Jun 18.
5.
Under the original proposal, Chaplains at Edinburgh, Williamtown and the Canberra 
area volunteered to participate as handlers in the program.  Due to the elapsed time since 
approval of enclosure 1, circumstances have changed for two of the three Chaplains who are 
unable to continue.  As the Program is dependent upon voluntary participation of Chaplain 
handlers, the invitation for participation was widened and the Bases that will now be involved 
are Williamtown, East Sale and Pearce.
Consultation
6.
SOLS-AFHQ has concurred with the context of the MOU and the executive 
management of YDDS is now prepared to co-sign the MOU.  COs and SADFOs at RAAF 
Bases Williamtown, East Sale and Pearce have been consulted and have indicated their 
favour with the conduct of the trial program over a six-month period.
Conclusion
7.
Your agreement is now sought to set a date and time for s47F
, a Director 
of YDDS authorised to represent the organisation, to attend your office for co-signing of the 
MOU.  In addition, your agreement is sought for a change of scope to now include RAAF 
Bases East Sale and Pearce in lieu of Edinburgh and the Canberra area, along with RAAF 
Base Williamtown.  DSIM-AF has also requested that a Ministerial Advice be prepared to 
inform MINDEF and MINDP of this initiative.
(a) Noted / Please Discuss
(b) Noted / Please Discuss
Digitally signed 
(c) Noted / Please Discuss
mark.will by mark.willis 
(d) Agreed / Disagreed
Date: 2018.07.13 
(e) Agreed / Disagreed
is
13:07:04 +10'00'
s22
Digitally signed by 
gavin.davies 
MA Willis
Date: 2018.07.18 
CHAP (AIRCDRE)
17:23:13 +10'00'
DGCHAP-AF
GN DAVIES, AO, CSC
Tel: ( 02) 6265 7013
AIRMSHL
M:  s22
CAF
Jul 18
Jul 18
Branch/Section Head
DGCHAP-AF
W: (02) 6128 7595
Mob: s22
Action Officer
WGCDR PL Cranage
W: (02) 6128 7572
Mob: s22
Enclosures:
1.
Approved Brief to CAF for trial of RAAF Workplace Welfare Dog Program.
2.
MOU – RAAF Workplace Welfare Dog Program.

 
 
BRIEF FOR CAF (THROUGH ACAUST AND DCAF): TRIAL OF A RAAF 
WORKPLACE WELFARE DOG PROGRAM 

Branch: DGCHAP-AF 
Reference:  R32057907 
 
Due Date:  EOY 2017 
 
RECOMMENDATIONS 
 
That you: 
 
(a)  Note the beneficial effects that Workplace Welfare Dogs (WWDs) can have on the general welfare 
and morale of individuals and Unit personnel.  
(b)  Agree the attached Initial Business Case proposing a trial placement for the WWD Program at 
RAAF Bases Edinburgh and Williamtown and the Canberra area. 
 
BACKGROUND
 
 
1. 
In May 2015, s47F
 (PERSPOL1), then a member of the charitable 
organisation ‘Young Diggers Dog Squad’ (YDDS), presented a brief to the Air Force Chaplaincy 
Leadership Group on YDDS’s proposition to train and provide Welfare Dog services to Air Force. 
Throughout the presentation s47F
 was accompanied by her own Welfare Dog, Tana, 
a former ADF explosives detection dog. 
 
2. 
Air Force Chaplain Branch sponsorship of an initiative to place WWDs in RAAF 
workplaces to bolster general morale and welfare at RAAF Bases through a Base Welfare Dog 
Program was advocated, subject to your approval.  If approved, a six month trial could commence 
at RAAF Bases Edinburgh and Williamtown and the Canberra area as soon as possible after 
obtaining your agreement. 
 
3. 
This program trial will be used to determine viability and, if successful, will shape a formal 
Business Case for approval of wider implementation of the WWD Program. 
 
KEY POINTS 
 
4. 
Air Force has an opportunity to implement an innovative mental health and welfare 
programme. Army and Joint Health Command have also expressed strong interest in the program. 
 
5. 
All dogs used for the workplace welfare dog program are certified assistance dogs IAW 
extant Commonwealth and State legislation. 
 
6. 
The dogs used for the RAAF Edinburgh and Canberra area trials will be provided by YDDS.  
The dog used in the RAAF Williamtown trial will either be provided by YDDS or will be a young 
dog already owned by a Chaplain at Williamtown that, if assessed as suitable, will be trained to the 
appropriate standard by YDDS for use at that Base. 
 
7. 
The attached Initial Business Case outlines details of research undertaken and procedures to 
be adopted if approval is granted. 
 
 


 
8. 
s47D
 
 
s47G
 
s47G
by YDDS s47G
  s47D
 
 
 
 
 
CONSULTATION 
 
9. 
Base Chaplains have been consulted to register interest for trial locations.  SADFOs at 
Amberley, Williamtown and Edinburgh were initially approached and agreed to trialling of the 
program.  DACAUST subsequently concurred, subject to CAF approval.  SADFOs in those 
regions were generally agreeable provided that the dog accesses the domestic areas only and 
security staff are made aware of the dog’s presence in advance.  At present, Chaplains at RAAF 
Bases Edinburgh and Williamtown and more recently the Canberra area have expressed interest 
in domicile of dogs, therefore, the trial will be limited to those regions for the time being. 
 
10. 
As the Canberra area Chaplain has only recently indicated willingness to participate, 
SADFOs for establishments in Canberra where there is a RAAF population have also been 
consulted and have indicated their support.  Mr Bruno Blasi, the APS Base Support Manager 
for the Russell, Campbell Park and APW precincts was also consulted due to the significant 
level of APS personnel in close proximity to Air Force personnel.  He has also indicated 
support for the program.  
   
11. 
YDDS s47G
 
 
  
 
12. 
Appropriate stakeholders have been approached for concurrence and their support is 
addressed in the Executive Summary.  
 
TIMELINE 
 
13. 
Approval by EOY 2017 would greatly assist to facilitate early consultation with 
stakeholders and lead to implementation of the program in early 2018. 
 
 
(a) Noted / Please Discuss 
 
(b) Agreed / Not Agreed 
 
 
 
 
 
 
K RUSSELL 
GN DAVIES, AO, CSC 
CHAP (AIRCDRE) 
AIRMSHL 
DGCHAP-AF 
CAF 
Tel: ( 02) 6265 7013 
     
M:  s22
    
       
    
        
      Nov 17    
      Nov 17 
Branch/Section Head 
DGCHAP-AF 
W: (02) 6265 7013 
Mob: 
 
s22
Action Officer 
WGCDR PL Cranage 
W: (02) 6128 7659 
Mob: 
 
s22


 
 
Attachments: 
1. 
Initial Business Case. 
2. 
Young Diggers Dog Squad Training Manual. 
3. 
Australian Veterinary Association article – Pets prove to be a positive influence on social 
 
capital 
 


 
 
 
 
INITIAL BUSINESS CASE 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE WORKPLACE WELFARE DOG PROGRAM 
 
Director General Chaplaincy – Air Force 
 
        
 

 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
1. 
Executive Summary. 
 
2. 
 Introduction: 
  Business Needs. 
  Project Background. 
  The Young Diggers Program. 
  Program Scope. 
  Program Plan. 
  Key Program Stakeholders. 
 
3. 
Program Resource Requirements: 
  Proposed Statement of Requirements. 
  Identification of suitable handlers. 
 
4. 
Risk Management: 
  External Risks: 
-  Training Program. 
-  Dog selection. 
-  Accreditation of YDDS. 
  Internal Risks: 
-  Awareness of program. 
-  Lack of potential handlers. 
-  Funding issues. 
-  Mistreatment of the dog. 
-  Dog aggressiveness and toilet training. 
-  Health issues. 
 
5. 
Safety Considerations. 
 
6. 
Cost. 
 
7. 
Benefits to Air Force. 
 
8. 
Recommendation. 
 
 

 
 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
 
1. 
This  Initial  Business  Case  seeks  approval  from  CAF  for  a  six  month  trial  of  a  RAAF 
Workplace Welfare Dog (WWD) Program at RAAF Bases Edinburgh and Williamtown and in the 
Canberra  area.    Should  the  program  prove  successful  at  the  conclusion  of  the  six  month  trial,  a 
formal Business Case will be submitted seeking approval for wider establishment of the program at 
viable establishments. 
 
2. 
The program will be sponsored by DGCHAP-AF in concert with the ‘Young Diggers Dog 
Squad’ (YDDS) from  whom  the dogs will be sourced s47D
    The  dogs, 
usually  rescued  dogs,  and  their  select  Chaplain  handlers,  will  undergo  training  to  Level  4 
certification  with  YDDS  accredited  trainers  initially  for  two  weeks  at  the  Bathurst  Correctional 
Facility and thereafter in their local areas for supplementary training to befit them for the task. 
 
3. 
The  implementation  of  the  RAAF  WWD  Program  will  be  of  great  benefit  under  the 
sponsorship of RAAF Chaplaincy. This initiative is viewed as an appropriate and natural extension 
of  RAAF  Chaplaincy,  as  the  aim  of  the  program  is  to  exponentially  raise  morale  and  general 
awareness  of  mental  health  as  one  of  the  keys  to  the  overall  health  and  wellbeing  of  the 
organisation. These dogs have the potential to extend the mission of RAAF Chaplaincy further and 
to  reach  out  to  many  more  members  who  may  be  suffering  emotionally  or  psychologically  in 
isolation. 
 
4. 
The intent is  for the dogs  to  be home-kennelled indoors in  a family setting with  a YDDS-
approved Chaplain handler who will visit access-approved workplaces in company with the dog to 
foster  pastoral  relations,  encourage  conversation  and  enhance  morale.    At  the  conclusion  of  each 
working day the dog will return to the home of its Chaplain handler. 
 
5. 
There will be no commingling of WWDs or Military Working Dogs (MWDs) at any of the 
regions and the dogs will sport a distinctive vest denoting that they are a WWD.  The acting Brand 
Manager  is  amenable  to  the  use  of  the  RAAF  emblem  on  a  GPU-patterned  vest  with  the  words 
‘RAAF  Welfare  Workplace  Dog’  emblazoned.    CO  RAAFSFS  is  also  supportive  provided  that 
there is a clear distinction between MWD and WWD vests. 
 
6. 
The Bases originally selected for the trial were Amberley, Williamtown and Edinburgh and 
the SADFOs at these bases are supportive of the trials subject to the dogs not venturing into areas 
with  elemental  WHS  requirements,  nor  causing  disruption  to  working  routine.    SADFOs  for 
Canberra-based  Units  and  the  Base  Support  Manager  for  the  Russell,  Campbell  Park  and  APW 
precincts in  the Estate  &  Infrastructure Group are also  supportive.   DACAUST has also  endorsed 
the  trial  subject  to  ACAUST  concurrence  and  CAF  approval;  however,  only  Chaplains  at 
Williamtown, Edinburgh and Canberra have been identified for participation to ascertain feasibility, 
therefore, the trial would be restricted to these three regions. 
 
7. 
The Chaplain  handlers  are  mindful that  acceptance of a dog  will be  a  commitment for the 
life  of  the  dog  irrespective  of  the  outcome  of  the  trial  and  that  the  dog  remains  a  dedicated 
functionary during the Chaplain’s tenure at the Base, and possibly beyond, at successive locations.  
YDDS s47G
 

 
8. 
Performance  measures  will  be  applied  to  test  the  effectiveness  of  the  WWD  Program 
throughout the trial.  The effectiveness of the Chaplains’ visits in relation to social engagement and  
 
 

 
 

 
interaction with members at the visit sites would be estimated, drawing on feedback from members 
to Chaplains and Unit management. 
 
9. 
Other performance measures might include observation of the influence the WWDs have on 
visitors  to  the  Chaplaincy  Centres  based  on  the  visitor  comfort  levels  in  the  presence  of  the  dog. 
This  feedback  on  effectiveness  would  be  compiled  by  Chaplains  in  a  monthly  report  to  unit 
management at the relevant bases. At the conclusion of the trial period a consolidated report would 
be provided to CAF, optimally in a formal Business Case seeking affirmation of the Program. 
 
10. 
DGPERS-AF,  DAFH,  CCJHC  and  SOL-AFHQ  have  been  consulted  and  concur  with  the 
proposal.    From  a  health  perspective,  DAFH  and  CCJHC  are  content  to  support  the  program 
provided  that  it  focuses  on  strategic  health  and  wellbeing  rather  than  PTSD  and  that  the  dogs  are 
referred  to  as  ‘Workplace  Welfare  Dogs’  rather  than  ‘Assistance  Dogs’  to  distinguish  them  from 
dogs with higher levels of specific function.  SOL-AFHQ advised that a MOU between YYDS and 
Air Force would be appropriate and that assistance could be provided for its drafting and execution. 

 
 
INTRODUCTION 
 
1. 
Business Needs.  The value of assistance dogs in promoting wellbeing for individuals and 
social interaction within groups has long been understood.   This innovative capability tool affords 
Chaplaincy  a  unique  opportunity  to  contribute  to  the  mental  health  and  wellbeing  of  Air  Force 
personnel.   
 
2. 
From a capability perspective, the application of WWDs by Chaplains would enhance their 
potential  to  reach  out  to  struggling  members  who  might  not  be  inclined  to  seek  support  from  a 
Chaplain.  This  lack  of  inclination  can  be  due  to  differing  personal  religious  beliefs,  the  stigma 
perceived  to  be  associated  with  seeking  personal  support,  or  simply  a  reluctance  to  address 
internalised issues. A WWD would serve as an ‘ice-breaker’ to establish a point of connection and 
potentially,  a  bond  between  the  Chaplain  and  members,  although  handlers  would  first  need  to 
establish  comfort  levels  of  individuals  with  the  presence  of  a  dog  prior  to  its  introduction  to  a 
workplace. 
 
3. 
Chaplains  are  able  to  go  where  psychologists  do  not,  by  reaching  out  to  personnel  in  the 
field and consequently, a WWD would work as an enabler to the mission of the Chaplain, thereby 
engendering a greater positive effect on members.  
4. 
Project  Background.    During  the  May  2015  Chaplains’  Leadership  Group,  SQNLDR 
s47F
 presented a brief to senior Air Force Chaplains on the charity organisation, Young 
Diggers  and  their  ‘Dog  Squad’.    The  Young  Diggers  Dog  Squad  (YDDS)  trains  rescued  dogs  to 
become  assistance  dogs  in  support  of  the  rehabilitation  of  serving  and  ex-serving  ADF  members 
who  are  dealing  with  PTSD  and  other  mentally  debilitating  conditions.  Throughout  her 
presentation,  SQNLDR s47F
 was  accompanied by her  own  welfare dog, Tana, a  former  ADF 
explosives detection dog.  
 
5. 
SQNLDR s47F
 discussed the positive aspects of welfare dogs in RAAF workplaces as 
well as RAAF Chaplaincy extending mental health support  at RAAF Bases through a ‘Workplace 
Welfare  Dog  Program’.  RAAF  Chaplaincy  expressed  keen  interest  in  the  concept  and  DGCHAP-
AF accepted Branch sponsorship of the initiative subject to approval from CAF. 
6
The  Young  Diggers  Program.    Young  Diggers  is  a  reputable  not-for-profit  charitable 
organisation that provides a variety of support services and programs to help serving and ex-serving 
personnel  of  the  ADF,  their  dependants  and  direct  family  members.    Their  main  objective  is  to 
assist  personnel  to  enhance  and  maintain  their  quality  of  life  during  transition  from  military  to 
civilian life and help them to overcome difficulties that they may be facing. 
 
7. 
The YDDS also trains rescued dogs to become role-specific Assistance Dogs in the main to 
support the rehabilitation of our serving and ex-serving ADF members who are dealing with PTSD.  
In  addition  to  helping  members  and  their  families,  the  program  also  saves  the  lives  of  abandoned 
dogs.  The dogs can also be trained in a non role-specific function to interact with groups of people.  
YDDS identifies suitable candidate dogs and provides specialised training and certification for both 
the dogs and their handler. 
 
8. 
The YDDS is a registered dog training organisation run entirely by the volunteers at Young 
Diggers and groups and businesses assist with sponsorship for the dogs to enable continuity of the 
program.    s47G
  they  are  trained  through  four  levels  of 
certification to meet the Public Access Test (PAT) standard required under local, State and Federal 
laws before handover.   
 

 
 

 
The four levels are defined as follows: 
 
a. 
Level  1  assessment.    Conferment  of  the  basic  obedience  certificate  that  demonstrates  the 
handler has sound control of their canine. 
 
b. 
Level  2  assessment.    The  dog  has  earned  the  Young  Diggers  Learner’s  jacket  and  an 
accreditation ID.  The team is then allowed access to public passage such as movie theatres, 
restaurants, shopping complexes and supermarkets. 
 
c. 
Level 3 assessment.   This is a nationally-recognised assessment test in preparation for the 
PAT. 
 
d. 
Level  4  assessment.    Recognises  successful  completion  of  the  PAT  and  provides  the  dog 
with full accreditation for access to public passage including all forms of public transport. 
 
9. 
The  copy  of  the  YDDS  s47G
  at  attachment  1  provides  greater  detail  of  dog 
training,  handler  obligations,  assessment  levels  and  local,  State  and  Federal  legislation  governing 
access to public passage. 
10. 
Program scope.  The scope of the RAAF WWD Program is to trial specially trained dogs as 
Welfare  dogs  for  RAAF  Chaplaincy  at  two  RAAF  Bases,  Williamtown  and  Edinburgh,  and  in 
Canberra for six months initially, with a view to seeking formal adoption of the program at RAAF 
Bases Australia-wide if the trial proves successful. 
 
11. 
The  scope  does  not  include  a  trial  of  welfare  dogs  for  individual  members  undergoing 
mental health treatment in the RAAF. The intent of this project is to prove the mateship value of the 
dogs  working  with  Chaplains  to  build  morale  and  enhance  the  emotional  health  and  wellbeing  of 
Air Force members and associated individuals. 
 
12. 
Program  Plan.    The  implementation  of  RAAF  WWDs  is  likely  to  be  carried  out  in  three 
phases. Phase 1 would be the six month-long trials at RAAF Bases Edinburgh and Williamtown and 
across  Canberra.  Phase  2  would  be  the  RAAF-wide  invitation  of  other  Chaplaincy  centres  and 
SADFOs  to  join  in  the  program.  Finally,  Phase  3  would  be  the  mature  state  of  the  program, 
involving continuous maintenance and improvement. The second and third iterations of the project 
would be refined and further scoped following a successful outcome of the Phase 1 trials.  
 
13. 
Key Program Stakeholders.  The major stakeholders in the program are: 
 
a. 
CAF. 
b. 
HPC. 
c. 
DGPERS-AF. 
d. 
DGCHAP-AF. 
e. 
JHC. 
f. 
ACAUST. 
g. 
Base SADFO/ABXOs. 
h. 
Base Chaplains. 
i. 
SOL-AFHQ. 
j. 
YDDS. 

 
 

 
PROGRAM RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS
 
 
14. 
Despite the wide implications of the RAAF WWD Program, the program should not cause 
significant  impost  on  existing  RAAF  resources.  The  dogs  would  be  housed  and  taken  care  of  by 
volunteer-handler  RAAF  Chaplains  s47G
  from  YDDS  supplementation  for  the 
duration of the do’s role as a WWD. During the dog’s non-working hours, it would essentially be a 
pet of the handler and their family. The only resources required would be: 
 
a. 
Initial dog and handler training for two weeks proximate to the s47B(a)
 
s47B(a) .   s47G
 
 
 
 
 
s47D
b. 
 
c. 
YDDS s47G
 
 
 
 
 
 provided by YDDS. 
 
15. 
Proposed  Statement  of  Requirements.    The  requirements  that  are  viewed  as  integral  for 
the success of the program include: 
 
a. 
Agreement for participation of Chaplains as WWD handlers in trial locations with Air Force 
populations. 
b. 
s47G
 with YDDS. 
c. 
Inclusion  of  an  additional  task  for  SODGCHAP-AF  to  act  as  the  RAAF  WWD  Program 
Manager within the Air Force Chaplain Branch. 
d. 
SOL-AFHQ legal support to draft the MOU between RAAF and YDDS. 
e. 
Public Affairs Office support for official launch of the program. 
 
16. 
Identification of suitable handlers.  YDDS s47G
 of Chaplains for 
participation in the program.  Sponsorship of the program is vested in the Chaplain Branch because 
Chaplains will have already completed training in the following skill sets:  
 
a. 
Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training. 
b. 
Two Day Mental Health First Aid Course. 
c. 
Senior First Aid Course with annual CPR refresher training. 
d. 
Difficult Conversations. 
e. 
Listening Skills. 
 

 
 
 

 
17. 
These skill sets are vital and will assist the Chaplains to identify personnel who may benefit 
from further pastoral interaction. 
 
RISK MANAGEMENT 
  
 
18. 
In considering risk management for this program, a number of points were addressed when 
consulting with stakeholders. They concern external and internal risks as follows:  
 
a. 
External risks. Potential risks considered were: 
 
(1) Training program.  Training will be undertaken by YDDS, which is a registered dog-
training organisation. The dogs will be trained to Level 4 certification by s47B(a)
 
s47B(a)
    Chaplain  handlers  will  then  be  required  to  undertake  a 
two  week  induction  handover  training  course  in  Bathurst  and  ongoing  annual 
supplementary training will be provided to the handlers in area. 
 
(2)  YDDS  s47G
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(3) An MOU is to be drawn up in accordance with Air Force Chaplaincy’s requirements and 
YDDS  to  mitigate  external  legal  risk  factors  and  combat  any  possible  ambiguity  and 
misunderstanding. The mutually agreed MOU will also include any associated fees and 
charges. 
 
(4) The  dogs  will  all  be  trained  to  Level  4  certification  with  accreditation  under  State  and 
Federal  laws.    YDDS s47G
 
  The dogs will 
accompany their Chaplain handlers on postings and agreement to this Business Case will 
ensure continuity of the program in successive locations.  
  
(5) Dog selection. YDDS s47G
 
.  Ideally,  suitable 
dog candidates would be medium-sized and optimally aged between six months to two 
years old for the most effective training.  
 
(6) Accreditation of YDDS.  YDDS is an established not-for-profit charity for both current 
and former members of  the ADF. This  is  a reputable charity  which  was previously  the 
s47G
 
 
 
  
b. 
Internal risks.  Potential risks considered were: 
(1) Awareness  of  the  program.    A  launch  of  the  new  WWD  program  through  an 
appropriate Public Relations campaign is recommended to mitigate the risk that the aim 
of the program will be misunderstood. The campaign would clearly inform personnel of 
the roll-out of the program, and its objectives and benefits to ADF personnel.  
 

 
 
 

 
(2) The Defence Community Organisation (DCO) is very supportive of this unique program 
and will also be a valuable source of networking  about the aims of the program  within 
the wider Defence community.  
 
(3) Lack of potential handlers.  The scope of the trial has been limited to three handlers to 
gauge the likely success of the program.  It is anticipated that the program will expand 
once  other  Chaplains  observe  the  benefits  to  be  gained  from  pastoral  visits  with  a 
companion dog. 
 

(4) Funding issues.  s47D
 
 
  
s47G
 
  YDDS.    s47G
 
  YDDS-
s47G
s47G     s47D
 
 
 
(5) Mistreatment of the dog.  YDDS s47G
 
 
 
 
  YDDS  s47G
.    The 
Chaplain would remain the responsible person for the correct treatment of the dog while 
on duty.  
 
(6) Dog aggressiveness and toilet training.  YDDS s47G
 
. Breeds such as Labradors are well-known for 
their  gentle  nature  and  temperament.  A  Welfare  dog  will  undergo  puppy  obedience 
training to  correct  any inappropriate behaviour such as biting during play  and  going to 
the toilet anywhere in the house. Dogs that have not been de-sexed can retain any natural 
aggressive  tendencies  which  could  result  in  biting.  To  prevent  this,  dogs  must  be  de-
sexed as well as being appropriately trained, including toilet training at an early age so 
as not to bite humans, irrespective of the dog’s breed. This will greatly ensure that at the 
right age, the dog will be suitable for training as a Welfare dog.  
 
(7) Health issues.   YDDS s47G
 
   s47D
 
 
 
    Such  coverage  is  recommended  as  the  ultimate 
defence  for  a  dog  falling  sick  or  getting  injured.  This  insurance  can  cover  unforeseen 
events  such as  major surgery  and dental work. There is  always the  vulnerability  for an 
active  dog  to  fall  ill;  however,  with  proper  regular  veterinary  care  the  likelihood  of 
significant cost from aggravated illness or injury could be greatly minimised.  
 

 
 
 

 
SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS
 
 
19. 
Chaplains who will be designated handlers will liaise with RAAFSAFE advisors to conduct 
risk assessments in their respective areas. An appropriate area of the Chaplaincy centre will be 
allocated for the dog during non-working business hours.  Chaplains will be mindful of potentially 
allergic and fearful members in workplaces and Units will be consulted prior to a Chaplain and 
WWDs entering the facility during the trial phase. 
 
COST 
 
20. 
s47D
 
 
 
  
s47G
 YDDS.   s47D
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
BENEFITS TO AIR FORCE 
 
21. 
Leading Australian and international psychologists and mental health workers agree that 
animals can directly benefit the mental and physical health of people1 as discussed in attachment 3. 
Benefits include improvement to cardiovascular health, reduction of overall stress and anxiety 
levels, decreased loneliness and depression, promotion of social cohesion, and can assist those 
affected by a number of mental illnesses.  Through the medium of a companion dog as an ‘ice-
breaker’ Chaplains will be best placed to identify those individuals that may be in need of 
intervention.  The minimal costs to Air Force for supplementation and care of WWDs would be 
outweighed by the advantages to be derived from integration of the RAAF Workplace Welfare 
Dogs. 
 
RECOMMENDATION 
 
22. 
In the view of foregoing considerations and clear benefits to Air Force personnel, trial of the  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
______________________ 
1   Australian Veterinary Association article – Pets prove to be a positive influence on social capital 

 
 
 

 
program for a period of six months is strongly recommended. 
 
 
 
 
 
K RUSSELL 
CHAP (AIRCDRE) 
DGCHAP-AF 
 
R8-3-042 
Tel:  (02) 6265 7013 
Mob:s22
 
email: [email address].a 
 
      Nov 17 





















Pets prove to be a positive influence on social capital 
Have you ever thought of pets as a uniting force encouraging cooperation, compromise and a general feeling of 
reciprocity? This sounds like a grandiose concept, but is a little more plausible when you see dog owners 
congregating at a dog park. Research shows that pets, and dogs in particular, can in fact bring people and 
communities together. 
What I am referring to is ‘social capital’, a complex concept defined simply as social relationships/interactions that 
foster collective beneficial outcomes. Social capital has been shown to be beneficial in a range of social, 
economic and political spheres, from social integration, cohesion and general societal wellbeing, to the efficient 
running of modern economies and growth in gross domestic product (GDP), through to public health and 
community governance.1 
In a study spanning four cities in two continents, researchers from The University of Western Australia have 
found that pet ownership contributes significantly to social capital.2 Individuals from comparable communities in 
Perth (Australia), and Portland, Nashville and San Diego (USA) were surveyed on a number of social capital 
determinants, including general helpfulness, friendliness, trust, reciprocity and civic engagement of people in their 
community. The results showed that people with pets had more social capital than those without. Those with 
dogs had even greater social capital and those who walked their dogs had even 
more still (Diagram 1). 
The authors suggest that their results reflect the idea that people with pets are deemed more trustworthy. And 
trust is a key driver of social capital. Previous observational studies have also shown that people with pets 
perceive others as more trustworthy.2 
Physiologically, these perceptions could be the result of oxytocin production, which is known to increase feelings 
of trust. Dog owners experience increased levels of oxytocin when interacting with their pooches and the authors 
conject that the same response occurs when interacting with any companion animal (Diagram 2). 
The positive effect of companion animals in other facets of human life has also been explored, with studies 
showing pets can help individuals with mental illness3 and autism4, and can also help develop social skills, self-
esteem and curb loneliness in children.5 
Collectively, this bank of research builds a strong case for more pet-friendly cities and societies. Given the 
growing trend towards high-density apartment living in Australia, now is the time for town planners and 
governments to develop strategies and policies to ensure our pets remain an integral part of our lives. 
Nidhi Sodhi 
Science Writer 
References 
 
1. Claridge T. Benefits and importance of social capital. 
www.socialcapitalresearch.com/literature/theory/benefits.html. Accessed 2 August 2017. 
 
2. Wood L, Martin K, Christian H et al. Social capital and pet ownership: a tale of four cities. SSM Population 
Health
 2017;3:442–447. 
 
3. Brooks H, Rushton L, Walker S et al. Ontological security and connectivity provided by pets: a study in the self-
management of the everyday lives of people diagnosed with a long-term mental health condition. BMC 
Psychiatry
 2016;16:409. 
 
4. O'Haire ME, McKenzie SJ, Beck AM et al. Animals may act as social buffers: skin conductance arousal in 
children with autism spectrum disorder in a social context. Dev Psychobiol 2015;57:584–595. 
 
5. Purewal R, Christley R, Kordas K et al. Companion animals and child/adolescent development: a systematic 
review of the evidence.Int J Environ Res Public Health 2017;14:234.