This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Request'.




Handling Misconduct  
 
4.1. 
The integrity of the APS is built on the integrity of every employee. If an employee’s 
behaviour does not meet the required standard, it can undermine trust in the APS 
as a whole—and work will need to be done for that trust to be restored. 
4.2. 
At the same time, confidence and trust in the APS can be influenced as much by an 
agency’s response to an employee’s behaviour as by the behaviour itself. This 
means that the response should be proportionate, specific to the nature of the 
conduct, and aimed at restoration—be that of the reputation of the agency or APS, 
workplace relationships and morale, or employee productivity and capability. 
4.3. 
A formal misconduct process is one option available to agencies when behaviour 
does not meet expectations, but it will not be a suitable or proportionate response 
in every case. As such, the preliminary consideration of a conduct concern should 
be broader than a decision about whether or not to take misconduct action: it 
should, instead, take the form of a diagnosis of the issue and the formulation of a 
tailored response that addresses the behaviour in context. 
4.4. 
Gathering further evidence to inform a decision about how to proceed is distinct 
from the process in a misconduct investigation of establishing facts on the balance 
of probabilities. Preliminary fact-finds do not establish whether the alleged conduct 
occurred, and should be undertaken only to the extent necessary for the agency to 
make a sound decision about how the matter should be handled. 
4.5. 
Agencies should ensure this process of assessment and deliberation is kept as short 
as possible without compromising the quality of the work undertaken, and should 
seek to avoid duplicating a misconduct investigation prior to deciding whether to 
notify the employee of an alleged breach of the Code. 
4.6. 
Agencies should be mindful that preliminary investigations or assessments, fact-
finds, or other formal investigative processes that include, for example, terms of 
reference, interviewing witnesses and taking statements, and developing a report 
with recommendations, may attract procedural fairness obligations and can be 
subject to review or legal challenge. 
Understand the circumstances 
4.7. 
Where an employee appears not to be meeting the standards expected of them, 
action needs to be taken to understand the nature and context of the behaviour to 
inform an effective response. 
 
 
29 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
4.8. 
While a single incident or allegation may indicate improper behaviour by an 
individual, consideration should also be given to factors that might have led to or 
underpinned the behaviour, and which may need to be addressed to prevent 
recurrence, support workplace harmony, or maintain or restore public confidence 
in the APS. These factors may be: 
  Personal—an incident may indicate that an employee needs additional 
support, training, or supervision, or that issues outside work may be 
affecting their behaviour that need to be addressed either with agency 
support (such as referral to the Employee Assistance Program or use of 
flexible work arrangements), or, if this is not appropriate or possible, 
outside the work context. 
  Interpersonal—an incident of poor behaviour by an individual may arise 
from a dispute between employees, and could indicate relationships that 
need to be repaired or managed with agency support or intervention. 
  Institutional—an individual’s behaviour may indicate systems, practices, or 
norms that do not support employees to meet their behavioural 
obligations. In such cases, institutional or cultural change may be needed. 
4.9. 
In some cases an employee’s behaviour may be so serious, or its impact so severe, 
that it would be appropriate for an agency to take misconduct action 
notwithstanding these additional factors. In such cases, it may be appropriate to 
take other management or restorative action in addition to the misconduct 
process—for example, to mend workplace relationships or address systemic issues. 
Conduct or performance? 
4.10. 
In the APS, performance is understood to be more than the completion of assigned 
tasks and duties—effective performance lies not only in what we do but also in how 
we do it. As such, agencies are expected to embed behavioural requirements in 
employees’ performance expectations—for example, by including in performance 
agreements statements of how an employee will demonstrate aspects of the 
Values, Employment Principles, and Code in undertaking their duties. 
4.11. 
The overlap between conduct and performance expectations means that there will 
not always be a clear distinction between a failure to meet performance standards 
and a failure to comply with expected behaviours. As discussed throughout this 
guide, agencies should take a targeted, proportionate, and restorative approach to 
behaviour that does not meet expectations, having regard to its nature and 
seriousness. 
 
 
30 
 




  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
  where a health condition or disability may affect the employee’s capacity to 
change their behaviour, engage constructively with management action, or 
participate in a misconduct process. 
4.17. 
Wherever possible, these situations should be addressed in the first instance 
through a sensitive conversation between the employee and their manager. 
Agencies should ensure that managers have the capability and support to do this 
well. Such conversations should seek to clarify the situation, identify the 
employee’s needs and the support the agency can provide (including reasonable 
adjustments), and confirm the employee’s understanding of the behavioural 
standards expected of them. 
4.18. 
Depending on the circumstances, the agency may seek the employee’s consent to 
engage with their treating healthcare professional to inform an appropriate and 
safe approach to ensuring behaviour meets the expected standard. There may be 
cases where the most effective and suitable response is to work with the employee 
and their treating doctors to assist the employee to manage the impact of their 
condition or disability on the workplace. 
4.19. 
In some circumstances, it may be appropriate for the agency to refer an employee 
for an independent medical assessment, consistent with regulation 3.2 of the  
PS Regulations. This can help ensure the agency has a clear understanding of the 
nature of the condition, and its impact on an employee’s behaviour, in order to 
inform an appropriate response. 
Assess the seriousness 
4.20. 
As a general principle, the more serious the alleged behaviour or the greater its 
potential impact on public confidence in the APS, the more likely it is that 
misconduct action will be appropriate. In assessing this, agencies should consider 
how the behaviour would be viewed by a reasonable member of the community, 
having regard to factors such as those below. This assessment does not require the 
behaviour actually to be known to the community, or to demonstrably have 
undermined confidence in the APS, at the time of the assessment. Rather, agencies 
should consider whether the behaviour is capable on its face of undermining trust 
in the APS, from the perspective of a reasonable observer. 
 
 
32 
 


Handling Misconduct  
 
Factors to consider 
Seniority 
4.21. 
The more senior an employee, the greater the impact their behaviour can have on 
public confidence in the integrity of the APS. Senior employees are expected to 
exercise a greater degree of judgement, and to model expected behaviours. They 
occupy a greater position of trust, and consequently are held to the highest 
standards of accountability. 
4.22. 
SES employees in particular have an obligation to uphold and promote the Values, 
Employment Principles, and Code, by personal example and other appropriate 
means. An agency’s response to concerns about the conduct of SES employees 
should have regard to these additional obligations, and to the greater impact of the 
conduct of SES employees on public confidence in the APS. Consistent with this 
principle, agencies are required under s.62 of the Commissioner’s Directions to 
consult the Commissioner on SES conduct matters. 
Role 
4.23. 
Agencies should consider whether the nature of the conduct, if proved, would 
reasonably call into question the employee’s ability to perform their current duties. 
4.24. 
This can have regard to any specific expectations, job requirements, or ethical 
standards that apply to the role, such as the obligations that attach to legal or 
procurement positions. As well, if the employee is a subject matter expert, there 
may be greater impact on public confidence if they appear to have provided 
misleading information about their area of expertise, or to have used inside 
information or expert knowledge for personal gain, or to the benefit or detriment 
of others. 
Nature and extent of conduct 
4.25. 
The greater the extent to which the conduct appears to fall outside expected 
standards of behaviour, the more likely it is to undermine public confidence in the 
APS. For example, sustained and large scale fraud is more likely to undermine 
confidence than a single angry outburst. 
4.26. 
Agencies should also consider whether a specific incident appears to form part of a 
pattern of behaviour or follows previous remedial action, or whether the employee 
has shown, through their behaviour, that they are unlikely to respond 
constructively to management action. 
Unconscious bias 
4.27. 
Agency assessments of the seriousness of employee conduct should take into 
account the impact of unconscious bias. Unconscious bias, or implicit bias, refers to 
33 
 




Handling Misconduct  
 
investigation makes a clear statement about the seriousness with which the agency 
views the matter, and provides a transparent and fair process to an employee who 
may face adverse consequences of their behaviour. 
4.33. 
In very serious, high-risk cases where any delay in acting raises a real risk that the 
safety of employees or clients may be compromised, or evidence destroyed, 
immediate consideration should be given to whether the employee will remain in 
their current role or location while the investigation takes place (see ‘Changes in 
role, assigning different duties and suspension’). In such cases, agencies may also 
choose to commence a misconduct process promptly rather than extending their 
preliminary deliberations. 
4.34. 
Regardless of their assessment of the behaviour, agencies should also consider the 
effects of the behaviour, and of any misconduct process, on the workplace—for 
example, any impact on employee safety, trust, morale, relationships, or 
productivity—and take steps to manage these effectively. 
Historical matters 
4.35. 
From time to time an agency may receive allegations of historical misconduct, or 
otherwise become aware of suspected misconduct from some considerable time in 
the past. 
4.36. 
How long ago the alleged behaviour occurred may be a relevant consideration in 
deciding what action to take, having regard, for example, to the availability of 
evidence, the resources that can reasonably be allocated to considering the matter, 
and the impact of the allegation and its handling on the agency or on public 
confidence in the APS. 
4.37. 
If an agency decides to take misconduct action in relation to a historical matter, this 
will need to be done in accordance with the Code as it applied at the time of the 
alleged misconduct. If the allegations relate to a former employee, misconduct 
action can only be taken if the former employee separated from the APS on or after  
1 July 2013. Misconduct action relating to historical matters must be carried out 
under the agency’s current s.15(3) procedures. If in doubt, agencies should seek 
legal advice. 
 
 
35 
 




Handling Misconduct  
 
6.1. 
The PS Act provides a framework for determining whether an APS employee or 
former employee has breached the Code, and, where necessary, for imposing 
sanctions. 
Section 15(3) procedures 
6.2. 
Section 15(3) of the PS Act requires agency heads to develop written procedures for 
determining: 
  whether an employee, or former employee, in their agency has breached 
the Code, and 
  the sanction, if any, that is to be imposed on an employee where a breach 
of the Code has been found. 
6.3. 
The s.15(3) procedures must: 
  comply with the basic procedural requirements set out in the 
Commissioner’s Directions (s.15(4)(a) of the PS Act), and 
  have due regard to procedural fairness (s.15(4)(b) of the PS Act). 
6.4. 
Section 15(4)(b) of the PS Act explicitly recognises that the administrative law 
principle of procedural fairness applies to the misconduct process. 
6.5. 
Agency heads must ensure that the agency’s s.15(3) procedures are made publicly 
available (s.15(7) of the PS Act). Many agencies meet this requirement by publishing 
their procedures on their websites. 
6.6. 
Section 15(5) of the PS Act provides that agency procedures may include different 
procedures to deal with: 
  different categories of employees—for example, probationers, 
  determining breach for former employees, or 
  determining breach for employees, or former employees, who have been 
found to have committed an offence against a Commonwealth, State, or 
Territory law. 
Procedural fairness 
6.7. 
Generally, administrative decisions, such as those taken in the misconduct process, 
must have regard to procedural fairness. Procedural fairness requires that: 
  a decision-maker is impartial, and free from actual or apparent bias (the 
bias rule), 
  a person whose interests will be affected by a proposed decision receives a 
fair hearing, including the opportunity to respond to any adverse material 
that could influence the decision (the hearing rule), and 
45 
 




Handling Misconduct  
 
The person under investigation must be given a reasonable opportunity to 
make a statement in relation to the alleged breach (s.59(b)) 

6.13. 
In practice, agencies should: 
  give the person under investigation a reasonable opportunity to respond to 
the substance of the evidence gathered during the investigation, including 
adverse claims or evidence, before a decision is made 
  ensure the breach decision-maker gives proper consideration to the 
person’s statement and response to the evidence before making a 
determination. 
6.14. 
If, during the investigation, new evidence comes to light about the actions or 
behaviours of the person under investigation, reasonable steps must be taken to 
notify the person of the substance of this additional evidence, or any new 
allegations, and give them an opportunity to respond, before a determination is 
made. This could include information suggesting possible additional breaches of the 
Code, or that the alleged conduct may be more serious than initially assessed. 
6.15. 
These requirements are consistent with the hearing rule of procedural fairness. 
An employee determined to have breached the Code must be informed 
before a sanction is imposed, and given reasonable opportunity to comment 
on sanctions under consideration (s.60) 

6.16. 
If a determination is made that an employee has breached the Code, a sanction 
cannot be imposed unless reasonable steps have been taken to inform the 
employee of the determination and each sanction being considered, and give them 
reasonable opportunity to comment. A sanction cannot be imposed on a former 
employee. 
6.17. 
Informing the employee means more than simply advising them of the range of 
sanctions available under s.15(1) of the PS Act. The agency must also take 
reasonable steps to inform the employee of the factors that are being considered in 
deciding on a sanction, and give the employee a reasonable opportunity to make a 
statement in relation to the sanctions under consideration. 
6.18. 
These requirements are consistent with the hearing rule of procedural fairness. 
Decision-makers must be independent and unbiased (s.61) 
6.19. 
Reasonable steps must be taken to ensure that the individuals who determine 
whether there has been a breach of the Code, and decide any sanction, are free 
from actual bias or any reasonable apprehension of bias. The test for reasonable 
apprehension of bias is whether a hypothetical fair-minded person, properly 
informed of relevant circumstances, could reasonably form the view that the 
decision-maker might not have brought an impartial mind to the decision. 
47 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
6.20. 
Examples of circumstances where bias could arise, or could reasonably be thought 
to arise, include the following: 
  The decision-maker has a personal interest in the decision, including, for 
example, a personal relationship or a close working relationship with the 
person under investigation, a complainant, or a witness. 
  The decision-maker has previously expressed a concluded view on a matter 
that needs to be determined. 
  The decision-maker has had access to prejudicial information, not relevant 
to the matters to be determined, but which could reasonably be believed to 
be capable of influencing the decision-maker’s views. 
  A senior manager makes comments on the case in a manner which could 
reasonably be perceived to influence a more junior decision-maker. 
  The decision-maker is a witness in the matter. 
6.21. 
Decision-makers should keep an open mind about the matters under investigation, 
and weigh the evidence fairly and dispassionately. Any favourable or adverse 
findings must be based on information or evidence that logically supports those 
findings, consistent with the evidence rule of procedural fairness. For this reason, 
among others, it is good practice for decision-makers to document the reasons for 
their decisions. 
Determination process should be informal and prompt (s.62) 
6.22. 
The process for determining whether an employee or former employee has 
breached the Code must be carried out with as little formality and as much 
expedition as a proper consideration of the matter allows. 
Decisions must be recorded in writing (s.63) 
6.23. 
If a determination is made in relation to an alleged breach of the Code, a written 
record must be made of the determination—whether or not a breach was found. 
6.24. 
Where a breach is determined and a sanction imposed, a record must also be made 
of the sanction decision. 
6.25. 
If a statement of reasons is given to the person under investigation, that statement 
must be included in the written record. 
  While there is no legislative requirement to provide a statement of reasons 
for breach or sanction decisions, it is good practice to inform an employee 
or former employee in writing of the reasons for a breach or sanction 
decision to ensure they understand why the decision was made and can 
meaningfully consider whether to pursue any avenue of review. 
 
48 
 






Handling Misconduct  
 
6.39. 
Agencies may take reasonable management action at any time, including where no 
breach is found, or where there has been a breach of the Code but no sanction 
imposed, or in addition to a sanction. For example, an agency could require an 
employee to participate in coaching to improve their skills or capability in a specific 
area, or provide mediation where there is an interpersonal dispute, or issue a 
warning in relation to specific behaviour, or require all employees to undergo 
training where a need is identified, regardless of whether a breach has been found 
or a sanction imposed. Any such response should clearly be identified as 
management action, rather than a sanction under s.15(1) of the PS Act. 
Key roles 
6.40. 
There are a number of key roles in a misconduct process, and agencies need to 
consider whether it is appropriate for the same person to fulfil more than one. 
Subject to agency s.15(3) procedures, it is possible for one person to act as both 
breach decision-maker and sanction decision-maker, though in some circumstances 
appointing separate decision-makers can avoid a perception of bias. Where 
suspension is being considered, it is desirable that a separate person with 
delegation under regulation 3.10 of the PS Regulations makes the suspension 
decision. 
Breach decision-maker 
Role 
6.41. 
The role of the breach decision-maker is to determine, in accordance with the 
agency’s s.15(3) procedures, whether or not a person has breached the Code. In 
effect, the breach decision-maker should establish two things: 
1.  whether the alleged conduct in fact occurred, and 
2.  if it did, whether that conduct is inconsistent with one or more elements of 
the Code. 
Appointment 
6.42. 
A breach decision-maker is appointed or authorised in accordance with an agency’s 
s.15(3) procedures. Determining a breach of the Code is not a delegable power or 
function under the PS Act. An agency’s s.15(3) procedures may identify the 
classification or position of persons with authority to appoint the breach decision-
maker, and, if so, the breach decision-maker must be appointed in accordance with 
these requirements. It is advisable for the breach decision-maker’s appointment or 
authorisation to be in writing. 
 
 
51 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
Considerations 
6.43. 
The breach decision-maker should be a person who exercises sound judgement, 
understands the legislative framework and requirements for making a breach 
determination, and is familiar with the agency’s business to the extent required to 
appreciate the context of the alleged misconduct and the evidence collected. They 
should be someone who is trusted to make autonomous decisions that have 
significant impact on individuals and the agency. 
6.44. 
The person who appoints or authorises the breach decision-maker should consider 
any previous involvement a proposed decision-maker has had in the matter, or a 
related matter. If there is any doubt about a proposed decision-maker’s actual or 
apparent impartiality, the agency should make another choice. It may be 
appropriate, subject to agency s.15(3) procedures, for a person from outside the 
agency or the APS to be appointed, if it is not possible to find a decision-maker free 
from apparent bias within the agency. 
6.45. 
The breach decision-maker may conduct the investigation themselves, or use an 
investigator. Where an investigator is used, the breach decision-maker still needs to 
form an independent view of the evidence, and remains responsible for making 
findings of fact and for any determination of breach of the Code. 
6.46. 
The breach decision-maker also has ultimate responsibility for ensuring that the 
decision-making process adheres to administrative law requirements, including 
procedural fairness, and the agency’s s.15(3) procedures. It is important for the 
breach decision-maker to be satisfied with the approach to and quality of the 
investigation, including: 
  the quality and quantity of the evidence, and whether or not the evidence 
establishes the facts on which any finding of misconduct is based 
  the way the evidence has been collected 
  that the agency’s s.15(3) procedures have been complied with and other 
legal requirements met, including procedural fairness. 
6.47. 
Where the decision-maker or investigator are internal to the agency, it may be 
helpful for them to be released from some or all of their normal duties while they 
conduct the investigation to ensure a timely process. Agencies may also need to 
consider special accommodation arrangements for decision-makers or 
investigators, such as the provision of an office or a secure cabinet for storage of 
sensitive material, as well as access to specialist advice to assist them in 
interpreting evidence or dealing with legal questions. 
 
 
52 
 


Handling Misconduct  
 
Investigator 
Role 
6.48. 
The role of an investigator is to gather evidence, including, where appropriate, 
interviewing witnesses, and to communicate with the person under investigation 
and any witnesses. The investigator may provide the decision-maker with their own 
opinions about the facts of the case, and prepare a report with recommendations, 
where this is consistent with agency s.15(3) procedures. 
Appointment 
6.49. 
Investigating alleged breaches of the Code is not a delegable power or function 
under the PS Act. An investigator is appointed or authorised by someone in the 
agency with the authority to make such appointments or authorisations. If agency 
s.15(3) procedures include provisions for appointing an investigator, the 
investigator must be appointed in accordance with the procedures. 
Considerations 
6.50. 
A person who investigates alleged breaches of the Code should have: 
  a good understanding of the APS employment framework; in particular, the 
PS Act and subordinate legislation, and the relevant requirements of the 
Fair Work Act 
  a good understanding of relevant requirements of the Privacy Act and the 
PID Act 
  a good understanding of administrative decision-making, including the 
requirements of procedural fairness and the need for balanced, reasonable, 
and fair decisions 
  sound skills in gathering evidence and conducting interviews 
  sound analytical skills, good judgement, strong interpersonal skills, and 
strong oral and written communication skills 
  a capacity to conduct administrative investigations, including weighing 
conflicting evidence for the purpose of making findings of fact 
  a capacity to provide a written report that is evidence-based, demonstrates 
sound reasoning, and sets out the process followed in the investigation, and 
the findings, in a logical, clear way. 
6.51. 
It may be useful for agencies to consider the options available to them in the event 
that they need to conduct an investigation. Some agencies may have a pool of 
employees with experience or training in misconduct investigations and knowledge 
of administrative law principles, while others may seek assistance from their 
53 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
portfolio department or another agency, or engage an external provider to conduct 
an investigation. 
Sanction decision-maker 
Role 
6.52. 
The role of the sanction decision-maker is to decide whether a sanction should be 
imposed on an employee found to have breached the Code, and, if so, the sanction 
or sanctions that are appropriate and proportionate in the circumstances. 
Appointment 
6.53. 
A sanction decision-maker is a person who has been given a delegation to impose a 
sanction from the range set out in s.15(1) of the PS Act. 
6.54. 
The framing of the delegation instrument should use broad language, bringing in 
relevant powers and functions under the PS Act and the Public Service Classification 
Rules 2000

6.55. 
The sanction decision-making power may be delegated to a person outside the 
agency or outside the APS. However, the prior written consent of the Commissioner 
must be obtained if an agency wishes to delegate the sanction decision-making 
power to an ‘outsider’—i.e. a person who is neither an APS employee, nor a person 
appointed to an office by the Governor-General, or by a Minister, under a law of the 
Commonwealth (ss.78(7) and (8) of the PS Act). 
Considerations 
6.56. 
A sanction decision-maker should be, and should appear to be, independent and 
unbiased, and should exercise good judgement. They should be familiar with the 
agency’s business and trusted to make autonomous decisions that have significant 
impact on individuals and the agency. 
6.57. 
To help ensure the quality and consistency of sanctions, agencies may wish to limit 
the delegation to apply a sanction to a small number of people within the agency, 
and further limit the number of people with the delegation to impose more serious 
sanctions. 
Suspension decision-maker 
Role 
6.58. 
The role of the suspension decision-maker is to decide whether it is appropriate to 
suspend an employee alleged to have breached the Code, having regard to the 
public interest and the agency’s interest. The suspension decision-maker is required 
to decide whether suspension is to be with or without remuneration, and must 
54 
 


Handling Misconduct  
 
review the suspension at reasonable intervals. 
Appointment 
6.59. 
A suspension decision-maker must be given a delegation to exercise the powers and 
functions in s.28 of the PS Act and regulation 3.10 of the PS Regulations. These 
powers and functions can be delegated to a person outside the agency or outside 
the APS—however, delegation to an ‘outsider’ requires the prior written consent of 
the Commissioner (ss.78(7) and (8) of the PS Act). 
Considerations 
6.60. 
A suspension decision-maker may make necessary inquiries to decide whether 
suspension is appropriate in the circumstances. This may include informing 
themselves of the results of any preliminary considerations to inform their 
assessment of the nature and seriousness of the alleged misconduct. 
6.61. 
To avoid the perception of bias or any real or apparent conflicts of interest, it is 
generally good administrative practice for the suspension decision-maker not to be 
involved in the related misconduct investigation under the agency’s s.15(3) 
procedures. 
Support roles 
Case manager 
6.62. 
‘Case manager’ is a term used in a range of ways across agencies. In a misconduct 
process, agencies may wish to have a dedicated person who liaises with the person 
under investigation, manages the contract for an external investigator if applicable, 
and overall acts as a single point of contact throughout the process. This person can 
also consider whether the person under investigation, or witnesses, require 
additional support from the agency. In some agencies, a case manager may also be 
the person responsible for investigating the alleged misconduct. 
6.63. 
This role would generally be undertaken by someone in the HR area with a good 
understanding of the misconduct process, experience in procurement and contract 
management if relevant, and the ability to deal sensitively with individuals who are 
involved in a process they may find personally difficult. 
 
 
55 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
Support person 
6.64. 
Agencies should advise the person under investigation, and relevant third parties 
such as witnesses, of their right to a support person at any stage of their 
involvement in a misconduct process. A support person is chosen by the person 
under investigation or witness. 
6.65. 
Decisions of the Fair Work Commission indicate that while a support person cannot 
advocate for an employee or speak on their behalf, they may do more than simply 
provide emotional support. For example, a support person can help facilitate 
mutual understanding between an agency and an employee if the employee is 
having difficulty understanding the process or the agency is misconstruing the 
employee’s perspective. It may also be reasonable for a support person to assist the 
person under investigation, or witness, in preparing for a discussion or interview, or 
to take notes. 
Representation and advocacy 
6.66. 
Agency industrial instruments or s.15(3) procedures may provide a right to 
representation or an advocate for a person involved in a misconduct process. 
Where a person involved in a misconduct process has indicated that they would like 
to be represented by a third party, agencies may wish to seek legal advice about 
whether it is appropriate to permit such representation. 
 
 
56 
 




  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
7.1. 
Once an agency has decided to commence a misconduct process, certain matters 
need to be considered at the outset. These may include deciding whether the 
person under investigation should remain in their role while the misconduct action 
takes place; deciding on the scope of the investigation; drafting the allegations; 
preparing an investigation plan; and notifying the person under investigation that a 
misconduct process has commenced. 
Changes in role, assigning different duties, and 
suspension 

7.2. 
Agencies should consider whether it is appropriate for the person under 
investigation to remain in their current role, or in the workplace, while the 
misconduct process takes place. 
7.3. 
Decision-makers in these matters should not prejudge, or be seen to prejudge, the 
outcome of the misconduct action. At this stage, the relevant measures are 
precautionary, aimed at protecting the interests and reputation of the agency, the 
public interest, and the interests of other employees, including the complainant or 
witnesses. In some cases, these decisions will also be made in the interests of the 
person under investigation. They are not to be used as a punitive tactic, or as a  
de facto sanction. 
7.4. 
Decisions about these measures may be made at the same time as a decision to 
start misconduct action, or at any stage during the misconduct process if there are 
further developments—for example, concerns raised by other employees, 
repetition of the behaviour, or new allegations coming to light during the 
investigation. 
7.5. 
Decisions about the role or presence in the workplace of the person under 
investigation during the misconduct process should have regard to the nature and 
severity of the specific risks, and should be proportionate to these risks. As 
appropriate, consideration may be given to options such as the following while 
misconduct action is on foot: 
  directing the person under investigation not to contact a specific person or 
people 
  directing the person under investigation not to discuss the matter openly, 
to maintain the confidentiality and integrity of the process 
  limiting the person’s access to particular data, files, or electronic systems or 
applications 
 
 
58 
 


Handling Misconduct  
 
  limiting direct or unsupervised contact with clients or stakeholders 
  removing supervisory responsibilities 
  assigning different duties to the person under investigation, including in a 
different location. 
7.6. 
If it is not possible to mitigate the risks in a given case through measures that would 
enable the person under investigation to remain at work, agencies may consider 
suspending the person from duty. 
7.7. 
Agencies should ensure that decision-makers in these matters have the authority 
under the PS Act or PS Regulations to make decisions to assign duties or suspend an 
employee. It is preferable for these decision-makers not to be involved in 
investigating the alleged breach of the Code or making a related determination. 
Assigning different duties 
7.8. 
An agency may decide that it is appropriate to assign different duties to the person 
under investigation, either for a temporary period or on an ongoing basis. The 
power to do so is the general assignment of duties power in s.25 of the PS Act. 
7.9. 
In order to ensure that all relevant facts are considered before making a decision to 
assign different duties, agencies should notify the person under investigation of the 
proposal and seek their views. Sometimes urgent action may be required that will 
not allow for that opportunity. In such cases, it would be appropriate to invite the 
person to comment after the decision has been made. Depending on their 
response, the agency has the flexibility to consider alternative arrangements, 
including suspension. 
7.10. 
Employees who are assigned to different duties are not entitled to seek review of 
the decision under s.33 of the PS Act unless it involves relocation to another place, 
or assignment of duties that the employee cannot reasonably be expected to 
perform. 
Suspension 
7.11. 
Where other options cannot mitigate the risks posed by the person under 
investigation remaining in the workplace, it is open to the agency to consider 
suspending them from duty. 
7.12. 
The starting point for considering whether to suspend an employee is whether the 
agency head (or delegate) believes on reasonable grounds that the employee may 
have breached the Code, and that suspension is in the public interest or the 
agency’s interest. 
 
 
59 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
7.13. 
It may be in the public or the agency’s interest to suspend an employee from duty 
where their continued presence in the workplace poses risks to, for example: 
  the safety and wellbeing of other employees or members of the public, 
including agency clients 
  the integrity of data held by the agency, including data about members of 
the public 
  the integrity of Commonwealth resources, including the public revenue—
for example, where the allegations relate to fraud or misappropriation 
  public confidence in the agency or the APS as a whole, including where the 
allegations may undermine public confidence in the agency’s capacity to 
perform its functions. 
7.14. 
Agencies may also wish to consider suspension where the alleged misconduct is 
serious—especially if there is a risk that the conduct may be repeated—or where 
there is a real risk of the investigation being compromised by the presence in the 
workplace of the person under investigation, and the risk cannot be mitigated in 
other ways. 
7.15. 
Advice to the person under investigation about a suspension decision should make 
clear that the decision is not a prejudgement of whether they have breached the 
Code. 
Legislative framework for suspension 
7.16. 
Section 28 of the PS Act and regulation 3.10 of the PS Regulations set out the 
legislative basis for suspending an employee who is alleged to have breached the 
Code. 
An employee may be suspended, with or without remuneration, where the 
agency head believes, on reasonable grounds, that the employee may have 
breached the Code, and where the suspension is in the public interest, or the 
agency’s interest (subregulations 3.10(1), (2), and (3) of the PS Regulations) 

7.17. 
The term ‘remuneration’ is not defined by the PS Act or PS Regulations, but, in 
accordance with its ordinary meaning, includes: 
  annual salary, excluding performance-based allowances, that would have 
been paid to the employee for the period they would otherwise have been 
on duty, including any approved higher duties allowances 
  other salary-related payments, including those associated with the 
performance of extra duties, such as overtime, but excluding overtime meal 
allowance, and shift penalty payments where there is a longstanding and 
regular pattern of extra duty or shift work being performed which would 
have been expected to continue but for the suspension from duty 
60 
 


Handling Misconduct  
 
  any other allowances of a regular or ongoing nature, including, for example, 
cost reimbursement allowances such as a temporary accommodation 
allowance. 
7.18. 
Factors to consider in deciding whether to suspend with or without remuneration 
may include: 
  the seriousness of the alleged misconduct—suspension without 
remuneration would usually be appropriate in cases where the sanction 
imposed might be termination of employment if the alleged misconduct is 
determined to be a breach of the Code 
  the agency’s obligations under s.15 of the PGPA Act with respect to the 
proper use and management of public resources. In the circumstances of 
the case, decision-makers should consider whether it is appropriate for the 
suspended employee to be remunerated if they are not working 
  the estimated duration of the misconduct action 
  the likely financial hardship, if any, for the employee: 
  The decision-maker can balance the seriousness of the alleged breach 
against the severity of the financial impact of the suspension. In some 
circumstances, the hardship imposed may be disproportionate to the 
alleged misconduct. In others, the alleged misconduct may be so 
serious that it outweighs claims of hardship. 
  While the onus is on the person under investigation to substantiate a 
claim of hardship by providing persuasive evidence to support their 
case, a decision-maker should give them reasonable opportunity to 
provide information about the nature of the hardship. For example, 
where the person claims that their bank would take possession of their 
house, the decision-maker might seek a statement to this effect from 
the bank, and/or a signed statutory declaration from the person under 
investigation. 
 
 
61 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
If the suspension is to be without remuneration, the period without remuneration 
is to be: 

a)  not more than 30 days, or 
b)  if exceptional circumstances apply—a longer period (subregulation 
3.10(3)) 
7.19. 
‘Exceptional circumstances’ are not defined in the legislation, but could include: 
  where a strong prima facie case of serious misconduct is apparent 
  where a finding has been made of a serious breach of the Code and a 
sanction is yet to be imposed—any delay between a determination and 
imposing a sanction should be minimised 
  where the person under investigation has been charged with a criminal 
offence and is waiting to have the charge heard and determined 
  where the person under investigation has appealed against a criminal 
conviction and is waiting to have the appeal heard. 
A suspension, with or without remuneration, must be reviewed at reasonable 
intervals (subregulation 3.10(4)) 

7.20. 
A review of suspension under regulation 3.10 is not a review of the original 
suspension decision. It is a fresh decision as to whether the person under 
investigation should remain suspended, having regard to the risks posed by the 
person’s presence in the workplace and whether suspension remains the most 
effective way to mitigate these risks. 
7.21. 
Agency guidance to employees should draw a clear distinction between the right to 
have a suspension from duty reviewed at regular intervals (subregulation 3.10(4)) 
and the review of action provisions in s.33 of the PS Act. 
  Review of suspension under subregulation 3.10(4) has a prospective effect. 
It examines whether a suspension from duty is to continue from the time of 
the review decision. It does not involve a reconsideration of the original 
decision to suspend the person under investigation. 
  By contrast, a review of action under s.33 of the PS Act involves re-
examination of the original decision. It is good practice to advise the person 
under investigation of their right to seek a review, under s.33 of the PS Act, 
of the decision to suspend. 
 
 
62 
 


Handling Misconduct  
 
Suspension must end immediately if the agency head no longer believes, on 
reasonable grounds, that: 

a)  the employee has, or may have, breached the Code, or 
b)  that it is in the public interest, or the agency’s interest, to continue the 
suspension (subregulation 3.10(5)) 
Suspension must end as soon as any sanction is imposed for the relevant breach 
of the Code (subregulation 3.10(6)) 

In exercising suspension powers, the agency head must have due regard to 
procedural fairness, unless they believe, on reasonable grounds, that it would not 
be appropriate to do so in the particular circumstances (subregulation 3.10(7)) 

7.22. 
Cases where the decision-maker believes that it is not appropriate to have regard to 
procedural fairness are likely to be unusual. It may be considered where there is a 
need to act urgently due to safety concerns or a risk that evidence will be 
destroyed, or where there is some other overriding public interest. In most cases, 
however, decision-makers will be able to have due regard to procedural fairness. 
The usual practice is to: 
  inform the person under investigation, in writing, of the agency’s 
preliminary intention to suspend them, and the reasons for this proposal, 
and 
  give the person a reasonable opportunity to respond before any decision to 
suspend is taken. 
7.23. 
An employee who is suspended without first being given an opportunity to 
comment should be advised of the reasons for the suspension decision, and for 
proceeding without seeking their comments, and invited to comment. On receipt of 
the employee’s comments, a review of the decision to suspend can promptly occur. 
Additional considerations 
7.24. 
It is advisable for agencies to inform the person on suspension about the agency’s 
policies regarding access to the workplace, entitlement to apply for jobs in the 
agency or other agencies, and attendance at training courses previously booked or 
approved. Further considerations are set out below. 
Keeping suspension delegate informed 
7.25. 
The requirements in the regulations concerning review and revocation of 
suspension decisions mean that the suspension decision-maker must be informed 
of progress in the misconduct investigation. They need this information to ensure 
that they can properly review, at reasonable intervals, the decision to suspend the 
person under investigation, or to revoke the suspension in the circumstances 
provided for in subregulations 3.10(5) and 3.10(6). 
63 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
Accessing leave during suspension 
7.26. 
An employee who is suspended without remuneration may be able to access paid 
leave credits during suspension. This will depend on what is reasonable in the 
circumstances, and is subject to the provisions of the relevant industrial instrument 
setting out terms and conditions of employment, as well as agency policies. Some 
agencies allow suspended employees to access accrued annual or long service leave 
credits, but not personal leave. The rationale for drawing this distinction is that 
personal leave is generally only available where an employee is prevented by illness 
or caring responsibilities from attending for duty. 
Outside employment during suspension 
7.27. 
An employee who is suspended may want to seek outside employment while the 
suspension is in place. Agency policies and procedures on outside employment 
would continue to apply, including consideration of whether any outside 
employment might create a real or apparent conflict of interest with the 
employee’s APS employment. A suspension with or without remuneration does not 
affect the employee’s obligation to comply with agency policies, lawful and 
reasonable directions, or the Code overall. 
Recognition of service during suspension 
7.28. 
Whether the period of suspension from duty counts as ‘service’ for purposes such 
as annual leave, long service leave, or maternity leave is dependent on the terms of 
the relevant legislation and any industrial instrument or contract that confers the 
entitlement to leave. For example: 
  Generally, it is considered that suspension from duty does not constitute a 
break in an employee’s continuous employment as defined in s.11(1) of the 
Long Service Leave (Commonwealth Employees) Act 1976 (LSL Act). Periods 
of suspension, with or without remuneration, would not affect an 
employee’s long service leave entitlements in the sense of breaking 
continuity of service. 
However, suspension without remuneration may not count as service for 
the purposes of the LSL Act, which means an employee suspended without 
remuneration generally would not accrue long service leave during the 
suspension. Suspension without remuneration would be considered leave 
without pay (LWOP) under the LSL Act, and would not count as service 
unless the agency head determines it should do so. Such decisions should 
be made by agency heads on a case-by-case basis, having regard to all the 
circumstances. 
  Suspension without remuneration may also be regarded as LWOP for the 
purpose of the Maternity Leave (Commonwealth Employees) Act 1973  
(ML Act). The ML Act requires a qualifying period of 12 months’ continuous 
64 
 




  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
possibility of identifying evidence that could prove or disprove the allegations, and 
the cost of gathering particular forms of evidence. 
7.35. 
Which elements of the Code will be in play will be a matter of judgement for the 
breach decision-maker. The decision-maker may opt to consider multiple elements 
of the Code, depending on the alleged misconduct, with a view that any final 
determination is more likely to be exhaustive. Alternatively, the decision-maker 
may choose one or two elements of the Code that are most relevant to the alleged 
misconduct if they believe that considering extra elements would add needless 
complexity to the decision or dilute the message about the seriousness with which 
the behaviour is viewed. 
7.36. 
Where an element of the Code contains more than one obligation, it is not 
generally necessary for the person under investigation to have failed to comply with 
all of these in order for a breach of the Code to be determined. For example, s.13(3) 
of the PS Act states that an employee, when acting in connection with APS 
employment, must treat everyone with respect and courtesy, and without 
harassment. A person found to have behaved discourteously, but not also found to 
have engaged in harassing behaviour, could nonetheless be found to have breached 
the Code. Thus, a breach decision-maker may choose in some cases to consider a 
subset of the obligations in an element of the Code. 
7.37. 
Agencies may provide general guidance to a breach decision-maker on which 
element(s) of the Code the person under investigation may have breached. 
However, the breach decision-maker needs to form their own judgements as to the 
scope of the investigation, as they are ultimately responsible for establishing 
independently whether the person under investigation has breached specific 
elements of the Code. 
Varying the scope 
7.38. 
As an investigation progresses, the investigator or breach decision-maker may 
discover additional allegations, or consider that the behaviours under investigation 
suggest additional elements of the Code may have been breached. In these 
circumstances, it may be reasonable to broaden the scope of the investigation. 
7.39. 
Where a decision is made to do so, the person under investigation must be advised 
of the additional allegations or elements of the Code, and given a further 
opportunity to comment, consistent with the requirements of procedural fairness. 
7.40. 
In some cases, agencies may need to consider whether new evidence or allegations 
should be dealt with separately, rather than varying the scope of the original 
investigation. This may be a matter of careful judgement, having regard to, for 
example, the degree of connection between the substance of the new and the 
original allegations, or any concerns about a decision-maker’s real or apparent bias 
in relation to the new matter. 
66 
 


Handling Misconduct  
 
7.41. 
If an agency is considering dealing separately with new allegations, a decision needs 
to be made about whether a new misconduct process is the proportionate response 
in the circumstances, or whether other management action would be preferable, 
having regard to the considerations in Chapter 4. 
Drafting allegations 
7.42. 
An ‘allegation’ in a misconduct investigation is a statement to the effect that the 
agency believes a person to have done a specific thing, at a specific time and place, 
which on its face appears to be inconsistent with one or more obligations in one or 
more elements of the Code. 
7.43. 
Allegations need to be capable of being proved or disproved. If a complaint or 
concern about a person’s behaviour is not capable of being expressed as a testable 
allegation, agencies should consider ways of managing the issue outside the 
misconduct framework. 
7.44. 
Allegations presented to the person under investigation in a notice of investigation 
are an articulation of the scope of the investigation, and of the ‘case against them’ 
to which the person is expected to respond. They form the basis for the 
investigation and the framework for the investigation report. 
7.45. 
An effective allegation is one that enables the person under investigation to 
understand exactly what they are alleged to have done, and to feel confident that 
the agency has not prejudged the outcome of the investigation. Effective 
allegations can also help agencies meet the requirements of procedural fairness: 
  Procedural fairness requires the person under investigation to be given a 
reasonable opportunity to respond to the allegations against them before a 
decision is made. This means that allegations should be presented in a way 
that is clear, specific, and unambiguous. 
  Procedural fairness also requires a decision-maker to be free from real or 
apparent bias—thus allegations also need to be drafted using language that 
is neutral and objective. 
7.46. 
Drafting allegations in clear and neutral terms can also ensure they are easier to 
prove or disprove. For example, an allegation that a person ‘raised their voice and 
struck a table with their fist’ in a meeting is more easily tested than one stating that 
the person ‘got angry and abusive’ in the meeting. The first is framed in terms of 
observable behaviour, and the person under investigation and any witnesses can be 
asked whether the person did in fact raise their voice and strike the table, and this 
evidence assessed on the balance of probabilities. It is much harder to establish 
whether the person was ‘angry and abusive’, however, as these are terms that can 
be interpreted subjectively. As well, this framing appears to require the person’s 
mental state to be established, which is not necessary for a determination of a Code 
breach. 
67 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
7.47. 
As such, allegations should: 
  set out specific incidents of observable behaviour in clear, objective 
language 
  state when and where the behaviour is alleged to have happened 
  separate multiple incidents so that each can be tested on its own 
  avoid using terms with specific legal definitions that need to be established, 
such as ‘assault’, ‘discrimination’, ‘fraud’, ‘theft’, etc. A determination of a 
Code breach does not require behaviour to meet the definitions or 
standards of such terms 
  if a policy is alleged to have been breached, state the specific provision of 
the specific policy 
  state which elements of the Code may be in breach if the allegation is 
proven on the facts. 
Investigation plan 
7.48. 
It is good practice to develop an investigation plan at the beginning of the process 
to articulate what needs to be done to establish the facts. A plan can include the 
following considerations: 
  Who is being investigated? What is the specific behaviour they are alleged 
to have engaged in? 
  What needs to be found out in order to establish the facts—i.e. to prove or 
disprove whether the person did what they were alleged to have done? 
  What evidence needs to be gathered and assessed in order to make 
findings of fact, and what are the potential difficulties in obtaining that 
evidence, if any? Are there timing considerations in gathering particular 
forms of evidence? 
  What is the quality of evidence needed in order to support a reasoned and 
reasonable determination of whether there has been a breach? 
  Who needs to be interviewed? 
  Are there any risks that need to be managed? For example, medical 
considerations, cultural considerations, absences from the workplace, or 
impact on the workplace. 
  Is legal advice needed? 
  Do any reasonable adjustments need to be made to enable the person 
under investigation, or any witnesses, to participate in the process? 
 
 
68 
 


Handling Misconduct  
 
  On the basis of these factors, how long can the investigation be expected to 
take? What are the timeframes for key milestones? 
  How will confidentiality be handled in relation to the identity of the person 
who reported the alleged misconduct, or witnesses? This is particularly 
important if the allegation was made as a disclosure under the PID Act. 
  What are the privacy issues raised by this matter, and what steps need to 
be taken to meet the agency’s obligations under the Privacy Act? 
Timeliness 
7.49. 
The Commissioner’s Directions stipulate that the process for determining whether a 
person has breached the Code must be carried out with as little formality and as 
much expedition as a proper consideration of the matter allows. This means that 
the investigation needs to be conducted efficiently—but that this should not come 
at the expense of a properly conducted process, or of procedural fairness 
obligations. 
7.50. 
Agencies should ensure timeliness in their investigations to the extent practicable, 
noting that some delays may be outside the agency’s control—for example, those 
due to unscheduled absences, or to criminal matters that are awaiting resolution. 
Decision-makers should also consider whether requests from a person under 
investigation for multiple extensions of time to respond, or requests for an 
extended period of time to respond, are reasonable in the circumstances. 
7.51. 
Ensuring timeliness is important for a number of reasons. Delays can affect the 
availability of reliable evidence, and the capacity of the person under investigation 
to respond fully to the case against them. For these reasons, among others, delays 
in investigations can reduce the likelihood of reaching a concluded view on whether 
the person did what they were alleged to have done. Unreasonable or extended 
delays in the investigative process, because of their effect on the person under 
investigation, can be a mitigating factor when deciding sanction. They are also a 
factor that may be considered by external review bodies. 
Notice of investigation 
7.52. 
Section 59 of the Commissioner’s Directions provides that a person alleged to have 
breached the Code must be informed of certain matters before a determination is 
made. Many agencies do this in the form of a written notice of investigation. 
7.53. 
A person under investigation should be notified at the earliest reasonable time of 
the decision to start a misconduct investigation, and of the identities of the person 
or people involved in investigating the allegations, making the breach 
determination, and making the sanction decision (if that person has been appointed 
at this stage). This allows the person under investigation to raise any concerns 
about apprehension of bias. Advising the person earlier rather than later can also 
69 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
help to avoid the undesirable risk of the person finding out through unofficial 
sources that an investigation is underway. 
7.54. 
Any notice to the person under investigation must be consistent with the 
requirements of the agency’s s.15(3) procedures, which in turn must be consistent 
with s.59 of the Commissioner’s Directions. 
7.55. 
As a matter of good practice, a notice of investigation generally should set out: 
  the specific behaviour the person is alleged to have engaged in 
  the element(s) of the Code they are alleged to have breached 
  the full range of sanctions that may apply 
  who will be investigating the alleged misconduct, if this is different from the 
decision-maker 
  the decision-maker who will make the determination. 
7.56. 
The notice should be drafted in neutral language to avoid the risk of appearing to 
have prejudged the outcome of the investigation. Notices should not include 
expressions of disappointment in the person or their behaviour, or language that 
presuppose that the person has behaved improperly or breached the Code. 
7.57. 
The notice may include a statement advising the person under investigation that 
their personal information is being collected, the uses to which it will be put, and 
the circumstances in which it will be disclosed. 
7.58. 
The notice may be signed, physically or electronically, by the person who has 
authorised the misconduct action, or by the decision-maker or investigator, in 
accordance with the agency’s s.15(3) procedures and relevant guidance or policies. 
A copy of this notice should be retained on the misconduct file—see section 12.1: 
Recordkeeping requirements. 
7.59. 
As a matter of good practice, agencies are advised to attach to the notice 
information about how the misconduct process will proceed, a copy of the agency’s 
s.15(3) procedures, and any relevant guidance material. Agencies may also consider 
including information about the support and advice available to the person under 
investigation. Employees may be offered support from, for example, their manager, 
HR, or the agency Employee Assistance Program, and both current and former 
employees may seek advice from the Ethics Advisory Service. Generally, employees 
and former employees are not entitled to assistance in meeting legal expenses 
incurred in relation to misconduct action (paragraph 2A of Appendix E to the Legal 
Services Directions 2017
). 
7.60. 
It may not always be possible to give the person under investigation complete 
details of the alleged breach at the outset of an investigation. In such cases, it is 
appropriate to inform the person in writing that an investigation has started, and 
outline the allegations as they are known at the time. The person should be advised 
70 
 


Handling Misconduct  
 
that they will be given further detail about the allegations as the investigation 
progresses, and an opportunity to make a statement in relation to the allegations 
and evidence, once the evidence has been gathered and before a determination is 
made. 
71 
 




Handling Misconduct  
 
8.1. 
Undertaking a misconduct investigation includes gathering and assessing evidence, 
and, in many cases, preparing an investigation report, to inform a breach 
determination that is sound and defensible. 
8.2. 
It is recommended that the breach decision-maker not be informed that the person 
under investigation has previous findings of breaches of the Code, if that is the case. 
Where this is not possible, the decision-maker should not take previous findings 
into consideration. This allows the decision-maker to make their determination 
solely on the evidence relating to the matter under investigation. However, it may 
be reasonable for a decision-maker to take into account previous warnings, 
directions, or other management action that has been taken in relation to the same 
matter. The relevance of prior misconduct should be considered in making a 
sanction decision. 
Gathering evidence 
8.3. 
Evidence can be collected from a range of sources. These can include interviews 
with witnesses, electronic records (for example, system logs or building access), or 
written statements. In some cases, physical evidence may be sufficient to establish 
the facts—for example, in cases involving suspected improper access to personal 
information, or improper use of email or internet, the investigation is likely to be 
founded on records of computer use. In other cases, witness statements or other 
evidence will need to be collected and considered. 
8.4. 
Where the person under investigation suggests there may be additional evidence 
that could corroborate their version of events, or otherwise disprove the allegations 
against them, this evidence should be gathered where practicable. Such requests 
should be evaluated in light of the relevance of the evidence and the requirements 
of procedural fairness. 
Conducting interviews 
8.5. 
The purpose of an interview is to gather and test evidence to assist in establishing 
factual matters. An investigator or decision-maker should consider the following 
good practice in conducting interviews: 
  Providing the interviewee with sufficient notice to allow for adequate 
preparation 
  Where appropriate, advising the interviewee that they may be 
accompanied by a support person (see ‘Support roles’ for more 
information) 
  Considering whether it would be appropriate to make available to the 
interviewee, before the interview, any documents that will be discussed at 
the interview 
73 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
  Preparing a set of questions 
  Questions should be framed in clear and neutral terms, and 
witnesses should not be prompted, even inadvertently, to confirm a 
particular set of facts or version of events 
  Advising interviewees that personal information relating to them, or any 
other person, and any evidence they provide, may be disclosed to others, 
including the person under investigation, where necessary and appropriate 
  Ensuring, where practicable, that the interview is conducted in a private 
location free from interruption. This may be a location outside the 
workplace 
  Wherever possible, seeking corroborating evidence from the interviewee of 
any claims they make 
  Advising the interviewee that a record of the discussion will be prepared 
and will be provided to them 
  The objective is to have jointly agreed records of interviews. If this 
cannot be achieved, it is good practice to document the areas of 
disagreement 
  Informing the interviewee of the arrangements for confirming the accuracy 
of the record of the interview, recording any disagreements, and setting a 
timeframe for the interviewee to respond 
  Deciding before the interview whether it is desirable for it to be audio-
recorded, and, if so, establishing the interviewee’s consent to the recording. 
It is usually appropriate to make a copy of the recording available to the 
interviewee 
  Ensuring notes of the interview are accurate and are recorded in the 
interviewee’s own words. Where a written record of interview is to be 
prepared, it may be convenient to use a note-taker 
  After the interview, considering whether evidence provided by the 
interviewee needs to be checked, either with the interviewee or against 
other sources of evidence. 
Interviewing the person under investigation 
8.6. 
Investigators are often required to interview the person under investigation for the 
purpose of establishing facts. An interview in these circumstances is not an avenue 
for procedural fairness, and the investigator may need to explain this to the person, 
and assure them that they will be given other opportunities to respond to the case 
against them before a decision is made. 
 
 
74 
 




  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
  Is any evidence missing? Is there enough credible, relevant, and significant 
(i.e. logically probative) evidence to support findings of fact on which a 
breach determination can be made? 
Assessing and evaluating evidence 
8.13. 
When making a judgement about the reliability of the evidence, investigators and 
decision-makers should consider the following: 
  Primary sources of evidence are preferable to secondary sources. For 
example, hearsay evidence is of less value than a first-hand account. 
  First-hand evidence of an event is what a witness to the event relates, 
while hearsay evidence is what someone says they were told about an 
event by another person who witnessed it. 
  Test disputed facts, or seek corroboration from other witnesses or 
evidence, where possible. 
  Evidence is more likely to be reliable if it can be confirmed or verified 
from another independent source. 
  Consider the credibility of witnesses, having regard to, for example, 
inconsistencies in evidence, honesty, or the possibility of collaboration or 
improper purpose. 
  Be mindful that conflicting versions of an event do not necessarily mean 
someone is lying. It is possible for different people to perceive or 
remember events differently. Consider what the balance of evidence 
suggests is the truth of the matter—for example, whether someone’s 
account is consistent with other evidence. 
  Be mindful of the impact of unconscious bias in assessing the credibility 
of witnesses. For example, a witness not making eye contact is not in 
itself a reason to conclude they are evasive or untruthful. More 
information about unconscious bias is in section 4.2.2. 
  A record of an event made contemporaneously is generally preferable to a 
record made days or weeks later. 
  For example, a diary note made close to the time of a conversation is 
likely to be more reliable than someone trying to recall the details of 
the conversation several months after it occurred. 
  An opinion generally has greater weight if it is given by someone with 
expertise on the matter. 
  For example, a medical practitioner’s diagnosis of a person’s state of 
health will be more reliable than a lay person’s opinion. Expert evidence 
may be evaluated by, for example, looking at the expert’s area of 
76 
 


Handling Misconduct  
 
expertise and its relevance to the opinion or evidence they have 
provided. However, an investigator should be wary of relying on their 
own non-expert opinion in a matter that requires expert judgement. 
Standard of proof 
8.14. 
The standard of proof applicable to findings that the Code has been breached, 
including the findings of fact that support the breach determination, is the civil 
standard. That is, findings are based on the conclusion that it is more likely than 
not, having regard to credible evidence, that the person under investigation has 
done what they were alleged to have done. This is referred to as ‘the balance of 
probabilities’. 
Procedural fairness—investigation and 
determination’ 

8.15. 
Subject to agency s.15(3) procedures, the investigator should provide the person 
under investigation with the relevant, credible, and significant evidence collected 
during the investigation and allow them to respond, comment, or correct the 
record. This may take the form of a summary of the substance of the evidence or 
witness statements, rather than the full documentation. 
  The hearing rule does not require all investigation material relevant to the 
allegations to be provided, but the person under investigation must be 
given sufficient details of the case against them to be able to respond 
properly. 
  Credible, relevant, and significant material may include adverse material 
that the decision-maker does not propose to rely on in making a particular 
finding or the decision on breach. Depending on the circumstances, it may 
be necessary for the person under investigation to be given an opportunity 
to comment on this. 
  If new or conflicting evidence comes to light that is relevant, credible, and 
significant, reasonable steps must be taken to provide the person under 
investigation with a reasonable opportunity to respond to that evidence 
before a decision on breach is made. 
  Procedural fairness does not always require that adverse material be put in 
writing. Subject to any requirement in agency s.15(3) procedures, it may be 
appropriate in some cases to put adverse material to the person at an 
interview. 
8.16. 
The investigator should also ensure that the person under investigation has a 
reasonable opportunity to state their case, including any extenuating 
circumstances. 
77 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
  The length of time given to respond to adverse material may depend on the 
complexity of the allegations and the evidence, and the particular 
circumstances of the person under investigation, having regard to the 
requirement in the Commissioner’s Directions to conduct the 
determination process with as much expedition as a proper consideration 
of the matter allows. 
  The person under investigation should be informed, consistent with the 
agency’s s.15(3) procedures, of how long they have to respond and whether 
the response can be oral or in writing. What can be considered a 
‘reasonable opportunity’ to respond depends on the relevant 
circumstances, including the extent and seriousness of the alleged 
misconduct and the capacity of the employee to respond. Whether the 
response is oral or in writing may depend on the complexity of the matters 
the employee wishes to raise, or the capacity of the employee to provide a 
written statement. 
  Procedural fairness requires the person under investigation to be given a 
reasonable opportunity, not a perfect opportunity, to put their case. This is 
determined by an objective standard—that is, what a reasonable person 
would believe was a reasonable opportunity given the circumstances. 
  Declining to respond to allegations of misconduct cannot be assumed to be 
evidence that the alleged misconduct occurred. 
8.17. 
The breach decision-maker may advise the person under investigation of their 
preliminary views about the alleged breach, and give them an opportunity to 
respond. This might be in the form of a draft decision or report if the decision-
maker deems this appropriate in the circumstances, or if it is a requirement of an 
agency’s s.15(3) procedures. 
Investigation report 
8.18. 
An investigation report is an explanation of how the available evidence leads to a 
particular conclusion about what happened. It is not enough to set out only the 
allegations, evidence, and conclusion—the report also needs to articulate the 
analytical process and explain how the evidence leads to the specific conclusion 
that has been reached. 
 
 
78 
 


Handling Misconduct  
 
8.19. 
A good quality investigation report should: 
  set out clearly the nature of the alleged misconduct—well-drafted 
allegations will assist with this 
  outline the factual matters that need to be established to determine 
whether the person under investigation did what was alleged. In order to 
do this, the investigation report may need to establish a clear chronology of 
events 
  set out the steps taken to collect evidence and information 
  present the evidence in a balanced way, including both evidence that 
supports and challenges the allegations 
  acknowledge and consider the response of the person under investigation 
to the allegations, and their response to any new or conflicting evidence 
uncovered in the course of the investigation 
  if there is a conflict in the evidence, explain why one set of evidence is 
preferred over another 
  outline the conclusions that are able to be reached on the available 
evidence—these need to flow logically from the evidence 
  include reasons why the action or behaviour that is found on the evidence 
could or could not be determined to be a breach of an element or elements 
of the Code. 
Making a breach determination 
8.20. 
The process of determining a breach of the Code requires the decision-maker to 
decide, after weighing the evidence, whether or not the person under investigation 
has, on the balance of probabilities, done what they were alleged to have done, and 
then to decide, as a consequence, whether or not the person has breached a 
particular element or elements of the Code. 
8.21. 
When a different person has undertaken the investigation, the breach decision-
maker remains responsible for the decision. The decision-maker needs, separately 
and independently, to consider the evidence where an investigator has made a 
recommendation about whether a breach of the Code has occurred. The decision-
maker must then reach their own conclusions, both on the findings of fact and 
about breach. 
 
 
79 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
8.22. 
Where a breach decision-maker has concerns about the recommendations made by 
an investigator, or about the investigative process, the decision-maker may act on 
those concerns and take additional steps to correct procedural flaws or satisfy 
themselves on particular matters. This might include writing to the person under 
investigation and giving them an opportunity to comment on the decision-maker’s 
preliminary view about findings of fact or breaches of the Code before a decision is 
made. 
8.23. 
In determining which elements of the Code have been breached, it is important to 
focus on the elements most relevant to the behaviour. A targeted approach is 
consistent with the premise that misconduct action in the APS has a corrective 
function. It is easier to explain to a person found to have breached the Code that 
their conduct was inappropriate if the elements of the Code are relevant to the 
misconduct. The person is also more likely to change their behaviour in the future if 
they have a clear understanding of the link between their conduct and the breach. 
Where more than one element of the Code has been breached, each element will 
need to be considered separately in the final decision. 
8.24. 
It may become clear to the breach decision-maker in the course of the investigation 
that no breach has occurred, or that there is insufficient evidence on which to base 
a finding that a breach has occurred. In some cases, this can be because the breach 
decision-maker forms the view that the person under investigation has done what 
was alleged but has made an honest and reasonable mistake due to, for example, 
systemic issues, such as a lack of adequate training or problems with technology, 
leading to a number of similar mistakes by colleagues, or that the action was taken 
at the direction of a manager. 
8.25. 
If evidence does not support a finding of a breach, the decision-maker can either 
terminate the decision-making process, or, alternatively, finalise the decision-
making-process with a determination that the employee has not breached the 
Code. The person under investigation should be advised of the outcome. 
8.26. 
Generally, there is no practical difference between an investigation that is 
discontinued without a finding of breach and one that determines no breach has 
occurred. However, in deciding how to proceed, a decision-maker should have 
regard to all the circumstances, including whether the time and resource costs of 
finalising the investigation are justified, and the impact on the person under 
investigation of discontinuing or of finalising the investigation. 
 
 
80 
 


Handling Misconduct  
 
Preparing a record of the determination 
8.27. 
Under s.63 of the Commissioner’s Directions, a written record must be made of the 
breach determination. Agency s.15(3) procedures may prescribe the form of such a 
written record, though they are not required to do so. 
8.28. 
As a matter of good practice, a record of a breach determination should generally 
include: 
  a summary of the evidence considered by the decision-maker 
  where the decision-maker also considered a recommendation from an 
investigator, the decision-maker’s response to the recommendation, 
including reasons for accepting or not accepting the investigator’s 
recommendation. The investigator’s report could be attached to avoid the 
need to reproduce the detail of the report in the decision record 
  findings of fact about what the person under investigation has done or not 
done. The findings need to be as specific as possible, and, wherever 
possible, linked to specific events 
  a decision as to whether what happened amounts to misconduct, and, if so, 
which element(s) of the Code were breached 
  the reasons for reaching these conclusions. 
Advising the person under investigation of the breach 
determination 

8.29. 
Under s.60 of the Commissioner’s Directions, reasonable steps must be taken to 
inform an employee found to have breached the Code of the breach determination, 
the sanctions(s) under consideration, and the factors under consideration in 
determining the sanction, before any sanction can be imposed. It is good practice to 
provide this information in writing. 
8.30. 
Where a former employee is found to have breached the Code, agencies should 
take reasonable steps to inform them in writing of the breach determination and 
their review rights. 
 
 
81 
 


  Handling Misconduct 
 
 
 
8.31. 
As a matter of good practice, a letter to the person under investigation should 
generally also: 
  enclose a copy of the breach determination record, and, if appropriate, the 
investigation report 
  for an employee, provide information about the process for making a 
sanction decision 
  In some cases it may be appropriate at this stage to advise the 
employee of the sanctions being considered, and the factors under 
consideration in determining a sanction 
  notify the employee or former employee of the right to seek review of the 
determination under s.33 of the PS Act 
  Both employees and former employees found to have breached the 
Code have the right to seek review by the MPC of the determination. 
  Applying for a review will not operate to stay the finding of breach or, in the 
case of a current employee, consideration of any sanction.
82