This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'EPBC Referral submissions - Iron Road, Central Eyre Iron Project'.


FOI 170103 
Document 1
Tumby Bay Residents and Ratepayers Association Inc. 
www.tbrara.com.au                                                                                                                                                          P.O. Box 95, Tumby Bay, S.A. 5605      
[email address]                                                                                                                                                            Telephone / Fax: 8688 4218 
 
 
The Hon. Mr G Hunt, MHR 
Federal Minister for the Environment 
GPO Box 787 
Canberra ACT 2601 
 
12th August 2014 
RE: Iron Road Limited/Mining/Eyre Peninsula/SA/Central Eyre Iron Project, Eyre Peninsula, SA  
Date Received: 29 Jul 2014 Reference Number: 2014/7285 
 
 
Dear Minister, 
Please find attached the Associations response to the call for public comment on the aforementioned EPBC Referral. 
Should there be any questions related to the submission, please contact: 
 
The Secretary, 
 
Tumby Bay Residents and Ratepayers Association Inc 
 
PO Box 95, Tumby Bay, South Australia, 5605 
 
 
Yours sincerely, 
s47F
Chairperson 
 
 
 
NB:  This page is NOT for publication 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

TO:   
The Hon Greg Hunt MHR 
 
Federal Minister for the Environment 
 
RE:   
Response to the call for Public Submissions to EPBC Referral 2014/7285 
     
Iron Road Central Iron Ore Project Infrastructure Corridor and Port Facility 
 
This submission has been prepared by the Tumby Bay Residents and Ratepayers Association Inc (TBRARA), its sub-
committee, Eyre Peninsula Community Mine to Port Consultative Committee (EPCMPCC) and in consultation with 
the Port Lincoln Residents & Ratepayers Association Inc. (PLRARA) 
The submission raises concerns about the claimed consultation processes undertaken by the Company; the paucity 
of scientific data as a consequence of 'rapid' environmental survey of the corridor and port site; the almost complete 
reliance upon literature surveys; the lack of site specific meteorological studies and the non disclosure of the 
chemical composition of fugitive dust associated with the mine, the transport corridor and the port facility and 
thence the impact upon the environment and listed and endangered species within that environment, both 
terrestrial and marine. 
BACKGROUND 
Claimed credibility of the Consultation process: 

 
"Iron Road has been implementing a comprehensive and ongoing community and stakeholder 
engagement program since 2011 in the CEIP Mine area.” 

 
Iron Road publicly announced Cape Hardy to be its preferred locality for a deep sea water port in December 2012 
and commenced comprehensive engagement with stakeholders and communities in March 2013.  
 
Engagement with these parties has taken many forms including: 
•  one on one meetings with affected landowners along the proposed infrastructure corridor 
•  meetings with all relevant local Councils 
•  meetings with groups of stakeholders with a common interest on issues, such as access arrangements in the 
infrastructure corridor, to encourage an exchange of ideas 
•  attendance at community group meetings 
involvement with both the Port Neill Community Reference Group and the Tumby Bay and District 
Community Consultative Group, combining stakeholder and community representatives 
•  drop in sessions/open ‘houses’ 
•  public meetings 
•  attendance at regional events (e.g. local agricultural shows) 
•  information and frequently asked questions sheets. 
 
Issues raised during public consultation have included loss of rural land and impacts on amenity and land values, 
additional services required for an increased population, maximising economic and employment benefits from the 
project, dust from mining and loading operations and stockpiles, operational noise from land and sea based facilities, 
traffic management, groundwater impacts to agricultural land and regional water supply, impacts to limited mains 
water supply and cumulative impacts from the various port proposals in the Spencer Gulf." 
 
The reality 
Apart from a concerted Company advertising programme in the press announcing progress on the Definitive 
Feasibility Study, to which no detail was forthcoming, stakeholder consultation comprised of Company spin. 
 
The comprehensive engagement with stakeholders in 2014 comprised of a concerted market campaign in April to 
sell the virtues of the recently released Definitive Feasibility Study.  A series of public meetings and drop in sessions 
was organized across the affected communities, with public meetings held in Warramboo and Rudall and drop in 
sessions at Wudinna, Port Neill and Tumby Bay. 
 
An approach was made by the EPCMPCC, a sub-committee of the Tumby Bay Residents and Ratepayers Association 
Inc, seeking to have the drop in one on one session at Tumby Bay changed to a public meeting whereby the Public 
had the opportunity to ask questions of the Company and the Public to hear the answers accordingly. 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 1 of 41 

To assist the Company in this approach a series of questions on notice relating specifically the Definitive Feasibility 
Study (DFS) were provided with the request letter. 
 
The Company's response to the request, under the hand of the General Manager was to decline and state: 
 
"Finally, I note the numerous questions and comments you included with your letter. You appear to have 
misinterpreted and/or misunderstood the bulk of the information outlined in the company's ASX 
announcement dated 26th February 2014 in relation to the DFS.  
 
Misinterpretation may cause unnecessary anxiety and fear in the community and I therefore encourage 
you to attend one of our planned sessions. You will be able to receive the facts directly from Iron Road 
which in turn will assist you in providing correct information to your members". 

 
No attempt was made to respond to the questions asked, or to hold a public meeting in Tumby Bay, noting that a 
significant portion of the proposal lies within the District Council of Tumby Bay. 
 
The Association made a submission to the Federal Governments White Paper on Competitiveness in Agriculture.  
The submission focussed upon the impact of mining on agriculture with reference to a number of mining 
proposals on Eyre Peninsula, including Iron Road. 
 
The Company responded to this submission: 
 
"I note that the White Paper has been commissioned by the Australian Government to boost 
agriculture's productivity and profitability. The Paper's intention is to identify pathways and 
approaches for growing farm profitability and boosting agriculture's contribution to economic growth, 
trade, innovation and productivity. 
 
The EPCMPCC's submission however appears to concentrate on scare mongering based on ill informed 
opinion or possibly deliberate misinformation. Moreover, your submission contains numerous errors of 
fact. (General Manager: E-F-LTR-0018_0)."  

 
Unfortunately, the Company failed again to take the opportunity to address the issues raised either through a public 
meeting or through a detailed explanation as to where the Committee or Associations were ill informed. 
 
The Association's response to this included 
 
“It is our contention that this is a major deficiency in the Company's quest for a social licence for the 
project, one which could be overcome through the formation of a Tumby Bay and District CCC 
specifically to address the issues of the CEIP project, especially in light of the forth coming public 
consultation processes surrounding the approval processes, thereby affording this community the same 
opportunity as has been the case for Wudinna and Warramboo.  
 
 It is noted that a copy of your letter has been forwarded to the Agricultural Competitiveness Taskforce. 
In line with the Government's offer to get involved with matters that influence the competitiveness of 
Australian Agriculture, the Associations responded accordingly, highlighting the issues of mining in 
agricultural areas as being a confounder to growth and sustainability of the industry.  
 
We note that the Company, through an article in the Granite (May 2014) has made an attempt to 
respond to some of the issues raised. Unfortunately our concerns remain and we have taken the 
opportunity to raise them again through the CEIP CCC as per the attached copy of a letter to Ms 
Lamont and the Committee." 

 
In the June edition of the Wudinna Community Newsletter, the Granite, the Company provided an article supposedly 
to dispel what it perceived as misinformation in the community. Apart from the disparaging remarks that certain 
sections of the community were ill-informed and scaremongering, the information was factually incorrect. Your 
attention is drawn specifically to the information pertaining to iron ore dust. 
 
"The mineral and geochemical composition of the magnetite deposit and surrounding rock is benign"  
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 2 of 41 

 
"The dust (CEIP iron ore dust) is non toxic and the potential for this to occur is not credible". 

 
The Association provided a response to this article to the Central Eyre Iron Project Community Consultative 
Committee (CEIP CCC). The response pointed out the misleading and inaccurate information provided by the 
Company supported by a number of references attesting to the health hazards of iron ore dust and its impact upon 
pastures.  
 
"The question posed, on the basis that heavy metals are synonymous with the geology of the Gawler 
Craton, was simply what are the concentrations of the metals so identified.  
 
The rationale behind asking the question was based upon the knowledge that Arsenic and Chromium 
(VI) are known carcinogens; "some studies of environmental exposure to manganese have suggested 
possible links to neurodegenerative disease"(Lazenby D: Literature Review and Report on Potential 
Health Impacts of Exposure to Crustal Material in Port Headland, pp52, 2007); the known toxicity of 
copper in concentrations above trace levels in cereal production land and its significant toxicity in the 
marine environment. It is noteworthy that no reference to the presence or otherwise of Cadmium was 
reported in the aforementioned document.  
 
The identification of Lead and Strontium leads to the question of what isotopic form of Lead and 
Strontium were identified as both Lead and Strontium have radiogenic properties arising from various 
radioactive decay sequences indicative of the presence of Uranium and other radioactive materials.  
 
It is reasonable to seek a scientific response to these questions given that the Gawler Craton has known 
occurrences of Uranium and other similar materials within its geological makeup. It is also known that 
Uranium exists in a nearby paleochannels thereby strengthening the argument for full disclosure with 
respect to the presence of radioactive materials in addition to the Radon and daughters of Radon 
known to be released in mining activities within the Gawler Craton.  
 
The significance of these questions lie in the fact there is the real possibility of these materials being 
deposited on the waste rock dumps thereby exposing these chemicals to leeching following rain or dust 
suppression with (hyper-saline) water and or windblown onto neighbouring properties. The potential 
contamination pathways need to be identified and mitigated against." 

 
Whilst the response focussed on dust at the mine site, the broader issue also remains unanswered, that is the impact 
of fugitive dust on the environment outside the mine, the transport corridor and the port facility with the 
environment being defined as inclusive of the habitats of listed and endangered species. 
 
The correspondence has been tabled at the CEIP CCC July meeting. It is understood no response has been 
forthcoming from the Company. 
 
Further, the 'questions on notice' provided to the Company in April were also provided to the CEIP CCC for their 
information and action. Again, no answers to the questions have been received. 
 
The Association forwarded through the EPCMPCC, a detailed letter raising issues associated with mining in the 
Tumby Bay District to the July Annual General Meeting of the Tumby Bay District Community Consultative Group 
(TBDCCG). This correspondence included the 'questions on notice' provided to Iron Road for the TBDCCG's 
consideration. To date, no response to this correspondence has been received. It should be noted that the TBDCCG 
has been identified by Iron Road as one of the community stakeholder groups. 
 
The Association and its sister Association, the Port Lincoln Residents & Ratepayer Association publish regular articles 
concerning mining on Eyre Peninsula, inclusive of articles relating to the proposed Iron Road project with specific 
reference to the identification of potential environmental impacts, especially in relation to ground water and fugitive 
dust. 
 
In recent correspondence to the EPCMPCC, the Company criticized a couple of website articles on ground water and 
dust and provided the Company's view of groundwater and dust. The correspondence accused the article of 
inaccuracies and claimed: 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 3 of 41 

"These are basic principles which high school geography students would be aware of and understand. 
The incorrect and misleading nature of the Drainage Graphic accordingly suggests that the creator of 
that image has an extremely poor and naive understanding of groundwater, or, alternatively, a 
deliberate intent on the part of the creator of the graphic to manipulate the data and create 
misinformation.
 
 
As such, the Drainage Graphic is nothing more than a colourful cartoon, and of no utility or relevance in 
reflecting actual scientific data, or informing readers of the same".   

 
The correspondence also made reference to errors in relation to dust: 
 
"The publishing or distribution of misleading statements presented as fact, including the depiction of 
data and figures with no scientific basis, or in a manner which misrepresents the data, is misleading 
and deceptive. It has the real potential to cause confusion and alarm in the community, to without 
foundation misrepresent the intent and integrity of Iron Road Limited, and to cause significant 
reputational and commercial damage to the Company. 
 
As you will appreciate, Iron Road Limited must reserve all of its rights to take such action as it sees fit 
to prevent the publication and dissemination of material that is misleading and deceptive, is included 
for the completeness of the record." (General Manager, ref E-F-32-LTR-0023_0) 

 
In all of this, the Company has not responded to the questions on notice submitted in April. 
 
The 'questions on notice' that have specific relation to the EPBC referral include: 
 
Salt 
Calculated groundwater seepage rates to the open pit and dewatering bores range from 12 to 23 
megalitres/day, dependent on the depth and size of the open pits at each stage of operation. Some of this 
water will be lost to evaporation within the open pits; the remainder will be recycled for use in dust suppression 
and the process plant. 
 
It has been reported that in the order of 400+ million tonnes of salt will be brought to the surface as a consequence 
of this activity (CEIPCCC meeting notes).  
 
Water 
During the course of the study, there has been significant reduction in the volume of water required for the mine 
operations (from 45 gigalitres per annum to 14 gigalitres per annum).  
 
Question: What is the regional hydrological impact of (a) dewatering the Warramboo pits to the extent of 12-23 
million litres per day and (b) the proposed extraction of water from the proposed Kielpa bore field? What is the 
impact of dewatering at Warramboo and Kielpa in terms of water required to sustain the environment? 
Notwithstanding the fact that the proposed Kielpa bore field is extracting saline water, what is the long term 
economic impact of reducing the water reserves that may become available for agricultural or human use due to 
advances in solar distillation technologies that could be applied to this water reserve? This is the future generational 
impact of what is being proposed to quote 'benefit the short term aspirations of the mining company'. 
 
The Port 
The inner harbour may be used for the import and export of low-volume high-value cargoes, including the import of 
machinery, cement and fertiliser and the export of copper concentrates, grain and other containerised cargoes. 
 
Question: Nowhere in the DFS is reference drawn to the mining of copper at Warramboo.  Furthermore, no 
reference has been made to the toxicity of copper in sea water, especially in light of the fact that Cape Hardy is on 
the migratory path of the Southern Wright Whale, a totally protected species. Are we to assume one of the 
undisclosed outputs from the mine is copper? 
 
Question: Given the quantities of fuel likely to be consumed, does the proposed port have the capacity to receive 
and store fuel? 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 4 of 41 

Question: It is noted that the ore will be transported from the mine in covered bottom dump wagons. Are the 
wagons sealed to prevent the escape of fugitive dust? Are the wagons decontaminated (cleaned) before leaving the 
port facility on the return to the mine? 
 
Question: Fugitive dust is of significant concern. The DFS is very short on information relating to the potential risks 
associated with fugitive dust contamination, indeed, the JORC statement on the environment failed to mention the 
potential risks due to contaminated pastures, cereal grain, wool, meat and rain water, not to mention potential 
health risks to humans. Is it a matter of convenience to overlook the accumulative impact of the 4% free silica 
contained in the final ore concentrate and the health effect of continued exposure over a significant period of time?  
Is it a matter of convenience to not make scientifically supported (including independent peer review) of all chemical 
analytical results pertaining to the presence or otherwise of heavy metals (Chromium (VI); Cadmium; Arsenic; 
Uranium and other radioactive substances (Thorium, Strontium [87], Radon) that are known to occur in deposits of 
this nature in the Gawler Craton and or the Paleochannels known also to exist within the region? 
 
Question: It is noted that the proposed port is listed as an export port for copper concentrate. This is the first 
occasion that the export of copper has been raised; therefore what are the environmental impacts of copper in the 
proposed project? Firstly what risk assessment has been undertaken to determine the impact of copper (at levels 
greater than those considered to be trace levels for the purpose of agriculture) on the farming community both in 
and around the proposed mine, the corridor and at Cape Hardy, especially in the context of copper toxicity in sea 
water and the very probable environmental damage arising? Where does the copper come from? 
 
Environment and Community 
Environmental and social impact studies, including baseline technical surveys and meetings with community groups 
and government agencies have ensured that Iron Road understands the potential benefits and impacts of the CEIP. 
 
Note: It should be recognised that no environmental or social impact statement have been released therefore the 
content of these studies HAS NOT BEEN SUBJECTED to any PUBLIC or third-party scrutiny. 
 
No clearly defined statement as to the impacts, social or economic, have been released to the public, hence the 
veracity of these reports remain subject to review. 
 
‘JORC Code 2012 Table 1’ Section 2 Reporting of Exploration Results 
Sampling Techniques 
Samples were also analysed for As, Sn, Ba, Sr, Cl, Ni, V, Co, Zn, Cr, Pb, Zr and Cu 
 
It is noted that uranium, thorium and other radioactive elements were not included in the analytical work; therefore 
the following questions remain unanswered: 
 
Given the known presence of uranium, thorium and other radioactive materials in the Gawler Craton bedrock and 
associated Paleochannels in the district, why are these substances precluded from any analytical results? 
 
Given the inclusion of Lead [Pb] in the analytical data, which isotope of lead was reported on, given that lead is the 
end product of various decay sequences for radioactive elements? Was it Pb 214; Pb 211; Pb 210; Pb 209; Pb 207 or 
Pb 206? 
 
Was lead therefore used as a marker for the presence of uranium? 
 
What was the concentration of the lead in ppm? 
 
Given that strontium was reported in the analytical result, what isotopic form of strontium was identified? 
If it were Sr87 (the radioactive isotope) was this used to determine the geologic age of the deposit using the 
Sr87/Rb87 dating procedures? If not, what was the concentration of the strontium sample in ppm? 
 
It is noted that the analytical work sought to determine the presence of arsenic and chromium. That being the case, 
what was the concentration of arsenic in ppm? 
 
With respect to the chromium, was the sample tested for hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI))? If so, what were the 
concentrations in ppm? 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 5 of 41 

It is noted that no mention in the analytical work was made of the presence or otherwise of cadmium. 
 
Given that Boron is an issue for the agricultural industry, why wasn't an analysis for the determination of existence 
and concentration of boron in the samples undertaken?  The issue being, if boron rich soil/overburden is brought to 
the surface as a consequence of mining and this material drifts onto neighbouring properties, agricultural yields 
could well be affected. 
 
It is noted that samples were analysed for the presence of copper.  What concentrations of copper occurred in the 
samples in ppm? 
 
Environmental factors or assumptions 
  Assumptions made regarding possible waste and process residue disposal options. It is always necessary as part 
of the process of determining reasonable prospects for eventual economic extraction to consider the potential 
environmental impacts of the mining and processing operation. 
 
While at this stage the determination of potential environmental impacts, particularly for a greenfields project, 
may not always be well advanced, the status of early consideration of these potential environmental impacts 
should be reported. Where these aspects have not been considered this should be reported with an explanation 
of the environmental assumptions made. 
 
  No environmental assumptions have been considered in the estimation 
 
Comment: As alluded to earlier in this response, the issue of the presence of radioactive material is of considerable 
concern, given that the MLP is proposed for the mining of iron ore and does not include the mining of radioactive 
material.  It is therefore assumed that if said materials are present then the disposal plan is for this material to be 
deposited on the waste rock heap.  That being the case (and clearly in the lack of evidence to the contrary) the 
material will be exposed to wind and water migration. Wind will result in the transportation of the material into 
neighbouring farming properties potentially contaminating pastures, grain, and through the food chain meat.  Rain 
will potentially leach the material from the waste dumps into the underlying and surrounding environment. 
 
The issue of radon gas which is a characteristic of mining deposits such as that proposed is not dealt with. 
 
The environmental impact of significant quantities of diesel fumes and particulates emanating from the mine is not 
dealt with. 
 
The real issue of fugitive dust which contains not only iron ore dust but potentially significant quantities of free silica 
as a consequence of the mining process is of a major concern. Added to this is the issue of fugitive dust arising from 
the transportation of the refined ore from the mine to the proposed port some 145 kilometres through prime 
agricultural land. The processed ore is reported to contain up to 4% silica and a non disclosed amount of other 
material, some of which may well be heavy metals. 
 
The inference is that there are no environmental impacts from dust. 
 
Environmental 
  The status of studies of potential environmental impacts of the mining and processing operation. Details of 
waste rock characterisation and the consideration of potential sites, status of design options considered and, 
where applicable, the status of approvals for process residue storage and waste dumps should be reported. 
  Iron Road will require approval under the Mining Act (1971) which includes the approval of a Mining Lease 
Proposal (MLP) and a comprehensive Program for Environment Protection and Rehabilitation (PEPR). 
  All baseline environmental surveys have been completed. The preliminary impact assessment did not categorise 
any potential Project impacts as 'High'. Detailed impact assessments are on-going in areas including air quality, 
groundwater, surface water, flora, fauna, noise, social, visual, and heritage. 
  It is expected that all predicted impacts may be adequately mitigated and/or managed and that the MLP and 
PEPR will be subsequently approved by the State Government. 
 
Note: In addition to the previous comments, the report fails to acknowledge the presence of protected species in the 
proposed project area (the Mallee Fowl and the Southern Right Whale). 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 6 of 41 

The report fails to acknowledge the health impact of the proposal. 
 
The report indicates the need to prepare a PEPR, but in the absence of evidence to the contrary, this document to 
date is not for public knowledge.  In short, the environmental performance criterion for which compliance is 
required is contained in a non disclosed document. 
 
The environmental and economic impact of the transport corridor appears not to have been included in any risk 
assessment pertaining to this disclosure document. 
 
The rehabilitation of the mine footprint and hole at the end of life, given the quantity of salt deposited on the 
footprint, is a significant undeclared environmental risk, given the expectation that the land will be returned to 
current use, i.e. agricultural land. 
 
DISCUSSION 
Without full disclosure the 'assumptions' alluded to in the Referral with respect to impacts upon listed species et al, 
are somewhat meaningless. 
 
The environment requires appropriate levels of ground water to survive. Clearly there is an ecological balance in 
existence in the areas under question, i.e. the Warramboo area and the proposed Kielpa bore field.  
 
The referral does not provide any consideration of the impact of dewatering of the proposed Warramboo Mine at 
the rates suggested in the DFS and it certainly does not make any reference to the impact on the environment of the 
potential for 400+ million tonnes of salt (over the life of the mine) to be spread over the footprint of the mine (as 
claimed by a company employee at a CEIP CCC meeting earlier in 2014).  This salt in now mobile to both wind and 
rain and free to impact upon the environment. 
 
Furthermore, there has not been full disclosure as to the nature of fugitive dust from the mine, the transport 
corridor or the port facility. 
 
The statement made by the Company that iron ore dust is non toxic is not only without scientific foundation, but 
totally misrepresenting the real hazards to the environment that fugitive iron ore dust brings. 
 
Depending upon the actual composition of the ore body, in this case a banded iron formation within the Gawler 
Craton, an ore body with a high probability of containing heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium and hexavalent chromium) 
together with manganese and uranium and thorium (or daughters thereof) given that these substances are known to 
exist in Craton deposits as well as evidence of uranium within paleochannels in the area, the composition of fugitive 
dust could contain various concentrations of these substances.  Whilst they may be claimed to be low 
concentrations, the problem is that the environment containing not only the listed species under consideration, but 
all species of plants and animal, including humans could be exposed to cumulative doses of these contaminants over 
the proposed 25 year life of the mine. 
 
It is well documented as to the health implications of heavy metals and uranium on the human species, but what is 
the case for exposure to these contaminants with listed species (plant of animal)? 
 
If the debate puts aside the immediate location of the mine and focuses on the transport route and the port facility, 
the position is clearly that of a contamination pathway of some 130 kilometres with what distribution pattern having 
regard to local meteorological conditions along the transport corridor and the contamination pattern associated 
with the activities of the port and its storage and loading facilities, again having regard to the actual meteorological 
conditions of this location, not some assumed conditions relevant to Cleve some 60 kilometres away? 
 
Clearly the referral is deficient in addressing the impact of fugitive iron ore dust of undisclosed composition upon the 
environment under consideration, the same environment in which the flora and fauna reside. 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 7 of 41 


The proposed Port Spencer site 
 
The debate needs to extend from the terrestrial environment to the marine environment. 
 
By design, the concentrate stockpile provides for storage of approximately 660,000 tonnes of concentrate. The 
stockpile will be around one kilometre long, 44 m wide and 30 m high. 
 
Whilst it is stated the stacker will have dust suppression capabilities, the issue goes beyond the actual dumping cycle 
to the impact of wind on the stockpile. What is not disclosed in the referral is the impact of the prevailing winds on 
the stockpile and the impact of fugitive dust rising from the stockpile and being transported into the marine 
environment (which from a starting point of view could be the proposed 'declared port operating limit' outlined 
above) 
 
What is the dust dispersion profile from the stockpile (approximately 1,000 metres long and 30 metres high) with 
winds from the south-west, west, north-west and north? To answer this question, meteorological studies need to be 
site specific, not a hypothetical model based upon weather observations at Cleve, some 60 km away or Kyancutta 
some 140 - 150 km to the north. 
 
There is no disclosure in the referral as to the composition of the fugitive dust being deposited neither along the 
transport corridor nor at the port facility. 
 
Given that iron ore dust potentially contains heavy metals, manganese and uranium et al products as well as the 
identified copper, the referral is deficient in its discussion of the impact of this dust on both the terrestrial 
environment, especially that hosting listed species, as well as the marine environment. 
 
Based upon the information contained within the Definitive Feasibility Study which clearly suggests the possibility of 
exporting copper from the facility, clearly the referral is deficient in its discussion of the impact of copper in the 
marine environment and its significant toxic impact upon seagrasses. 
The desktop analysis of a multitude of databases provided a view of what possible listed or endangered species may 
be at the proposed site. What appears to be deficient in the referral is the actual evidence/research that has been 
undertaken to confirm the presence or other wise of the species identified in the literature. 
 
What surveys were undertaken over a twelve month period of the marine habitat enclosed by the proposed 
'operating limit of the port'? 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 8 of 41 

Having confirmed the presence of listed or endangered species and their location within the marine environment 
relative to the proposed infrastructure and operating zones, the question remains, what is the impact of the 
proposed action on these species and the environment that sustains them? 
 
The specific questions take the form of:-  
 
•  What impact has copper on the marine environment in which the listed species, southern right whale resides 
for a period of time? 
 
•  What impact has copper on the marine environment and the feeding habits of the white bellied sea 
eagle which is known to habit this area? 
 
•  What impact has copper on the marine environment and the survival of leafy sea dragons which are 
known to exist in the region, although not recognised within this report? 
 
A similar set of questions can be asked with respect to the other undisclosed components of fugitive iron ore dust, 
given that the contamination pathway will operate for the life of the proposed mine (25-30 years) and beyond, if the 
action were to include mining of the remaining identified prospects in the tenement EL4898? 
 
The Company claimed, in the Definitive Feasibility Study, "The preliminary impact assessment did not categorise any 
potential Project impacts as 'High'." 
 
Public credibility of this statement is very low. 
 
The methodology employed 
Upon reading the referral, one important observation is the extensive use of desktop analyses or literature searches 
from which assumptions are made as evidenced by the following:- 
 
"The species is known to be present in Rudall Conservation Park, Darke Range Conservation Park and 
Carapee Hill Conservation Park, however, there are no records of this species within 5 km of the 
infrastructure corridor. Whilst it is possible that individual plants may occur along the corridor, the 
remnant vegetation patches are too fragmented and disturbed to support viable populations of these 
species. Given the absence of records near the corridor, and failure to identify this species in field 
investigations, it is highly unlikely the corridor supports a population of this species or habitat critical 
for its survival. A significant impact to this species from the proposed action is unlikely."  

 
The field investigations, namely the ''rapid methodology referred to" , undertaken over five days to 'survey' 130 
kilometres of corridor, assuming access has been granted to the full 130 kilometres, in November and or December 
is hardly evidence of a detailed environmental impact study upon which an investment the size of the CEIP is 
proposing depends. 
 
This leaves the unanswered question; what about the remaining 51 weeks of a year? 
 
"Given the absence of records near the corridor" implies, of course that the transport corridor has been known for 
eons and that a formal reporting process has been in place to 'report' occurrences of listed species thereon. Clearly 
the authors of the document do not expect such comments to hold any credibility with the public. 
 
Consideration given to the white bellied sea eagle 
Apart from the observed fly over by the 'survey team', what investigations were carried out to determine the 
population of white bellied sea eagles in the vicinity of the proposed port and storage facility, given the knowledge 
that these birds are somewhat territorial and do have a significant hunting range? 
 
What research was undertaken to determine the presence or other wise of breeding pairs in the vicinity of the 
facility? 
 
What research was undertaken with respect to the presence or otherwise of the dietary requirements of the eagle 
within the vicinity of the proposed facility? 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 9 of 41 

What research was undertaken with respect to the potential impact upon that food source by fugitive dust 
emanating from the facility? 
 
What research has been undertaken to determine what other factors (light, noise) would impact upon the habitat of 
the eagle and as a consequence, and an appropriate risk assessment made? 
 
It is known that the sea eagle habitat extends over this area and that there are known breeding site(s) within the 
area. 
 
The referral appears to be deficient in its investigation of the occurrence and potential impact upon the sea eagle. 
 
Consideration given to the Mallee fowl 
The presence of Mallee fowl on Eyre Peninsula is well known, but Freeman, et al (Malleefowl (Leipoa ocellata) 
1
2
Conservation on Eyre Peninsula, South Australia: Andrew Freeman ; Paula Peeters ; Graeme Tonkin) writes: 
 
"Mallee fowl continue to survive on northern Eyre Peninsula (EP) in isolated patches of habitat both in 
the reserve scheme and on private land. However, information on the viability of these scattered 
populations remains limited.  
 
To assess the success of Mallee fowl conservation programs on Eyre Peninsula, population trends need 
to be monitored. As Mallee fowl density is difficult to measure directly, changes in the number of active 
mounds over time are being used as an indicator of changes in Mallee fowl density, as recommended 
by Benshemesh (2000).  
 
Five survey grids (2 km x 2 km) have been established in Munyaroo, Pinkawillinie and Hincks 
Conservation Parks as well as in two heritage agreements one just north of Cowell and one just north 
of Lock (Fig. 6)." 

 
Benshemesh, J. (2007). National Recovery Plan for Malleefowl. Department for Environment and Heritage, South 
Australia, writes:- 
 
Nonetheless, there is insufficient information available to accurately assess the conservation status of Malleefowl 
across Australia except in broad terms. This is primarily because little is known of the population dynamics of the 
species, or its current distribution and population trends in many areas. Despite these uncertainties, there is no 
doubt that Malleefowl are currently threatened by a range of factors, and in many areas there has been such loss 
and fragmentation of their habitat that remaining populations are small and isolated, and prospects for their long-
term conservation are poor. Detailed and extensive monitoring of Malleefowl populations in Victoria, SA and NSW 
have shown steep declines in breeding densities over the past decade, and the past five years in particular (Priddel & 
Wheeler 2003; Gates 2004; Benshemesh 2005). (pp10:  Underlining added) 
 
No particular populations or general areas can be described as being of greater importance for the long-term 
survival of Malleefowl than any other at this stage. Malleefowl still occur over most of their range, and although 
populations tend to be sparser in areas with low or highly variable winter rainfall, this is compensated by these areas 
being extensive. Conversely, Malleefowl densities are highest in remnants of habitat within the wheatbelts, but 
these areas are usually small and fragmented and will require intensive management in the long term to retain the 
species. (pp18-19) 
 
Some forms of mining involve the removal of all vegetation at a site and causes major disturbance to the substrate 
which may have long lasting effects despite efforts at revegetation. Such destructive mining should be prohibited in 
areas that support remnant vegetation and relatively high densities of Malleefowl unless clear long term gains for 
Malleefowl can be demonstrated. (pp 25) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 10 of 41 

Table 2.   
Number of Malleefowl records (to 2005) in the NRM areas across Australia sorted by time periods that contain 
similar numbers of records across Australia. Shaded rows indicate a total of less than ten records in an NRM. 
Numbers are indicative only and may contain records duplicated across different databases. Data sources are shown 
in Table 1.  
 
 
NRM region name 
Before  1964- 1977- 1981- 1992- 1996- 2000- Total 
1963  1976  1980  1991  1995  1999  2005 
NSW 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Central West 
19 

18 
20 

13 
17 
97 
 
Hawkesbury/Nepean 








 
Hunter/Central Rivers 








 
Lachlan 
15 
30 
33 
75 
13 
17 
11 
194 
 
Lower Murray/Darling 

17 
25 
27 
29 
72 
51 
229 
 
Murrumbidgee 

29 
36 
46 



125 
 
Namoi 







16 
 
Western 



12 



26 
NT 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Northern Territory 
19 






20 
SA 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Aboriginal Lands 
10 


12 
17 

40 
94 
  Eyre Peninsula 
26 
23 
21 
36 
23 
53 
37 
219 
  Mount Lofty Ranges and 








Greater Adelaide 
  Murray Darling Basin 
74 
66 
84 
64 
34 
37 
96 
455 
  Northern and Yorke 



14 


19 
60 
Agricultural District 
  Rangelands (SA) 






16 
38 
  South East (SA) 
17 
21 
21 
52 

59 
29 
205 
VIC 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Glenelg Hopkins 








 
Mallee 
107 
88 
172 
63 
26 
37 
71 
564 
 
North Central 
20 






30 
 
Port Phillip and Westernport  2 







 
Wimmera 
13 
22 
42 
11 
10 
24 
33 
155 
WA 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Avon 
49 
99 
59 
21 
100 
97 
73 
498 
 
Northern Agricultural Region  26 
33 
29 
27 
15 
18 
52 
200 
 
Rangelands (WA) 
81 
74 
58 
99 
37 
32 
30 
411 
 
South Coast Region 
25 
12 
28 
26 
199 
51 
31 
372 
 
South West Region 
47 
14 
13 
12 
19 
11 

122 
 
Swan 







11 
 
Total 
591 
569 
658 
637 
536 
549 
616 
4156 
(pp 110) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 11 of 41 

Table 3.   
Number of Malleefowl records (to 2005) in the biogeographical regions across Australia (Environment Australia 
2000) sorted by time periods that contain similar numbers of records across Australia. Shaded rows indicate a total 
of less than ten records for a Bioregion. Data sources are shown in Table 1. Numbers are indicative only and may 
contain records that are duplicated across different databases. 
 
 
Biogeographical region 
Before 1964- 1977- 1981- 1992- 1996- 2000- Total 
1963  1976  1980  1991  1995  1999  2005 
AW  Avon Wheatbelt (WA) 
67 
75 
28 
19 
27 
37 
80 
333 
BBS  Brigalow Belt South (NSW) 
11 

11 
17 

15 
17 
80 
BRT  Burt Plain (NT) 








CAR  Carnarvon (WA) 
17 






44 
CR 
Central Ranges (NT,SA,WA) 
16 






26 
CP 
Cobar Peneplain (NSW) 
15 
39 
50 
67 



187 
COO  Coolgardie (WA) 
10 
12 
36 
14 



89 
DRP  Darling Riverine Plains (NSW) 







21 
ESP  Esperance Plains (WA) 


21 
23 
187 
46 
29 
323 
EYB  Eyre Yorke Block (SA) 
31 
31 
23 
47 
24 
60 
68 
284 
FIN  Finke (NT) 








FLB  Flinders Lofty Block (SA) 








GAS  Gascoyne (WA) 








GAW  Gawler (SA) 







24 
GS 
Geraldton Sandplains (WA) 

18 
18 
22 


13 
85 
GD 
Gibson Desert (WA) 








GSD  Great Sandy Desert (NT) 








GVD  Great Victoria Desert (SA,WA) 
21 
12 

14 
20 
10 
35 
114 
HAM  Hampton (WA) 



36 
27 


74 
JF 
Jarrah Forest (WA) 
21 
11 
10 




65 
KAN  Kanmantoo (SA) 
15 
11 





27 
MAC  MacDonnell Ranges (NT) 








MAL  Mallee (WA) 
22 
44 
56 
30 
104 
89 
32 
377 
MUR  Murchison (WA) 
14 
23 

15 



72 
MDD  Murray Darling Depression  
195 
189 
311 
200 
107 
187 
270 
1459 
(NSW,SA,VIC) 
NCP  Naracoorte Coastal Plain 
10 
19 
20 
48 

54 
20 
174 
(SA,VIC) 
NSS  NSW South Western Slopes 

15 
14 
26 



66 
(NSW) 
NUL  Nullarbor (SA,WA) 







11 
RIV  Riverina (NSW,SA,VIC) 
22 

25 
12 



68 
SEH  South Eastern Highlands (NSW)  1 







STP  Stony Plains (SA) 








SWA  Swan Coastal Plain (WA) 








SB 
Sydney Basin (NSW) 








TAN  Tanami (NT) 








VM  Victorian Midlands (VIC) 







20 
VVP  Victorian Volcanic Plain (VIC) 








WAR  Warren (WA) 
18 






27 
YAL  Yalgoo (WA) 
13 
23 




11 
61 
 
Total 
587 
569 
658 
635 
535 
549 
615 
4148 
(pp111) 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 12 of 41 




The following sighting was sourced from the Australian Living Atlas website: 
www.ala.org.au 
Leipoa ocellata  
Malleefowl 
Observation: 2013-11-14 13:39 
Added: 8 months ago  
Nantuma Road, Warramboo SA 5650, Australia 
Lat: -33.2908861 
Lng: 135.6928556 
Coord source: camera/phone 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Consideration given the southern right whale. 
 
"There are no known current or historical aggregation areas within the South Australian gulfs 
(Kostoglou and McCarthy 1991; DSEWPaC 2012). 

 
The SRW are easily identifiable by the general public and highly conspicuous during their nearshore mother-calve 
aggregations. As such, a single individual (or mother and calf) may be sighted on numerous occasions as they move 
east to west from one aggregation area to another, as evidenced by South Australian Whale Centre records (2013-4). 
Despite historic infrequent sightings of SRW within Spencer Gulf, the gulf is not part of any established or historical 
migration path or aggregation area. 
 
Given the tendency of SRW to show high fidelity to existing aggregation areas, the likelihood of large numbers of 
SRW using the gulf in future is considered highly unlikely. Individual SRW (or mother and calf pairings) that visit 
Spencer Gulf are likely moving from one aggregation area to another (Victoria to Encounter Bay to GAB) and not 
using the area for foraging or nursery grounds. 
 
Arup (2013), using data from the South Australian Whale Centre, list eleven possible sightings of SRW (the species 
was unidentified in two of those sightings) between 1997 and August 2012 with a combined total of 19 whales 
sighted. Since then, two SRW were sighted at Point Lowly in September 2012. From 5 - 11 July 2013, there were 
seven separate sightings of up to four whales near Port Neill (SA Whale Centre 2013). It is likely that most, if not all, 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 14 of 41 


of these sightings involved the same whales. Sightings in the Whale Centre’s database are predominantly from the 
Victor Harbour region. 
 
There were no recorded boat strikes in the Spencer Gulf and only one in the general area of the gulf (at Cape Jervis). 
(underlining added) 
 
Arup (2013) also notes that a deep water facility has operated at Port Bonython (Santos refinery) in the Upper 
Spencer Gulf for the last 30 years with no recorded incidents of whale strike." 
 
Unfortunately, the records consulted were not up to date.  A fatal ship strike occurred just south of Tumby Bay in 
2013 with the cause of death being confirmed by the SA Museum. 
 
With the proposed increase in shipping through Port Bonython, Whyalla, Pt Pirie, the proposed Braemar 
Development just north of Wallaroo, Lucky Bay, cape Hardy and Pt Spencer, the probability of increased ship strike 
on whales increases. 
 
This probability increases with the increasing incidence of whale movements in the lower Spencer Gulf region as 
observed and reported in recent times. 
 
A singular reference point of the Whale Centre in Victor Harbour is hardly evidence of whale movements in the 
Spencer Gulf. 
 
Is this action part of other actions? 
The answer to this question has been sought but avoided by the Company. The reality being the DFS document, a 
document put to the market outlining the benefits of investing in the CEIP project. The document contains 
statements as to the reserve ore bodies, giving a total ore reserve of some billions of tonnes thereby providing 
evidence of a potentially economic ongoing mining proposition, albeit with some caveats included. 
 
The Company has identified and listed a number of additional prospects together with an estimate of the ore 
reserve. 
 
 
The extent of the prospect is outlined in table A3, pp 25 Definitive Feasibility Study. 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 15 of 41 

This information is that which was posted on the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX code IRD). The inference being, 
the tenement has potential for expansion, and by definition implies it is part of a further action. 
 
In addition, the transport corridor and port is dependent upon an addition action, being the mine or mines. 
 
The bigger picture is neither disclosed nor assessed in this referral. 
 
Indigenous Culture and Heritage  
Eyre Peninsula has been home to Aboriginal people for thousands of years, with the Nauo (south western Eyre), 
Barngarla (eastern Eyre), Wirangu (north western Eyre) and Mirning (far western Eyre) being the predominant 
original cultural groups present at the time of the arrival of Europeans (Tindale 1974 in DEH 2004a; SATC 1999).  
 
All Aboriginal groups on Eyre Peninsula are known to have used a wide variety of native plant and animal (including 
fish) species for food and other resources.  
 
The Lake Newland area is traditionally associated with the Nauo Barngarla and Wirangu peoples with visits by the 
desert Kokatha peoples. The Barngarla/Nauo people are the traditional owners of the land of Lincoln National Park 
(DEH 2004b). The Gawler Ranges to the north of Eyre Peninsula are thought to have been part of the boundary of 
Barngarla and Kokatha territories (DEH 2006a). This area is thought to be rich in cultural sites.  
 
An archaeological survey along the Anxious Bay coast from Elliston to Fowlers Bay yielded important information 
about the use of coastal areas and Lake Newland during day-to-day life, through a number of camp sites and midden 
finds (Nicholson 1991 in DEH 2003).  
 
The area around Lincoln National Park has a rich Aboriginal cultural heritage with a number of sites of Aboriginal 
significance having been described, including fish traps in Porter and Proper Bays (DEH 2004b). The most 
comprehensive archaeological study undertaken to date on lower Eyre Peninsula and surrounding areas was a fish 
trap study by Sarah Martin in 1988 (Welz 2002)22.  
 
A number of surveys and research recorded 87 fish traps, as well as a number of campsites and soakages (Welz 
2002). In 1999, Eddie Munro was commissioned by the (then) Australian Heritage Commission to conduct an 
archaeological and anthropological survey of lower Eyre Peninsula. Munro reviewed data collected from past studies 
to establish a database of over 145 sites, including burials, stone arrangements, middens and fish traps.  
 
Other archaeological/anthropological studies on Eyre Peninsula were predominantly commissioned by companies 
or agencies in response to proposed developments. No comprehensive, wide ranging or exhaustive study has 
been undertaken for Eyre Peninsula to date.  
 
Many sites of cultural significance are recorded under the State Heritage Register but there are many unrecorded 
sites of major significance to Aboriginal people
.  
 
The majority of registered and reported Aboriginal Heritage Sites in the Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region occur 
along the coast, with clusters around the coastlines near Coffin Bay and Avoid Bay, Port Lincoln and Louth Bay, 
Cowell, Whyalla, the coastline west of Sheringa, Anxious Bay, Sceale Bay, Corvisart Bay and Streaky Bay, Smoky Bay, 
Ceduna, the coastline between Denial Bay and Point Bell, and Fowlers Bay. Inland sites include Lake Malata, 
Wanilla, Yalata Aboriginal Reserve and near Kimba.
 
 
An absence of registered or reported sites does not indicate an absence of sites or objects; it may simply indicate 
that an area has not been surveyed for Aboriginal cultural heritage sites. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 16 of 41 

CONCLUSION 
The referral has been made in a climate of non disclosure to the public. 
 
The evidence provided by an examination of the minutes of the two identified Community Consultative Groups, CEIP 
CCC and the TBDCCG would confirm this assertion. 
 
The Company's dealings with the Port Lincoln Residents & Ratepayers Association Inc, the Tumby Bay Residents and 
Ratepayer Association Inc and its subcommittee, the Eyre Peninsula Community Mine to Port Consultative 
Committee is indicative of the contempt the Company holds to any party who seeks answers to real questions and 
whom are not prepared to accept company spin. 
 
The declaration of climatic conditions based upon meteorological observations at Kyancutta and Cleve, both some 
distance from the actual transport corridor is also indicative of the approximations the company is putting forward.  
Where are the site specific data relating to wind, temperature etc for the port, for given points along the corridor 
and for the Warramboo dispatch point? Without this data, noise dispersion patterns, dust dispersion patterns have 
no credibility. 
 
Clearly this referral indicates the company's position, that on the basis of limited field surveys  (given that access to 
property was not granted by all whom are likely to be affected by this proposal) and significant desktop literature 
reviews, as opposed to a genuine longitudinal environmental study of at least twelve months across the designated 
area, a study that would actually establish a reasonable baseline upon which impacts could actually be measured in 
the future, lead to the conclusion: 
 
"None of the 17 species of conservation significance with potential to occur in the study area are 
expected to be significantly impacted. If local individuals occur they may be displaced however all of 
the fauna species are highly mobile and unlikely to be solely reliant on habitat within the study area. 
 
Mitigation activities to avoid impacts to fauna species during construction and operation that will be 
addressed as part of a CEMP for the proposed development are considered sufficient to reduce impacts 
to these species." 

 
The Company, in presenting the case, has clearly not consulted with the local community with respect to the 
presence or otherwise of both the whale and sea eagle.  Clearly the very limited on site survey of the habitat around 
the port is deficient, given that on site surveys could have been conducted in 2011, 2012 and 2013 during the whale 
migration period and throughout the year with respect to the sea eagle. 
 
The reliance on desktop analyses in this case has been shown to be limited. The problem with whale sightings et al 
on this section of the coast is the lack of human occupancy to actually make the observations and to report them, in 
contrast to that which happens at Victor Harbour. 
 
The report does not provide the public with the confidence that the habitat/environment within which the listed 
species reside will not be impacted to the extent of total displacement from an existing habitat. 
 
The pristine environment which we enjoy has been degraded enough, without having the impost of heavy industry 
further degrading it to such an extent that listed species et al will no longer be present, and significant quantities of 
money being required to rehabilitate the environment at the completion of this action. 
 
One only has to point to the port of Esperance and the reported $23M being spent to rehabilitate this area as a 
consequence of fugitive dust impacting upon humans let alone our natives species. 
The claim by the Company that this is not a controlled action is unsustainable. 
Any decision as to the actual approval should be withheld until a detailed Environmental Impact Study is undertaken 
as a consequence of the Development Application that has been lodged with the South Australian Government and 
the submission of a Mining Lease application, or a full EIS required under the provisions of the EPBC Act is 
undertaken, given that this action is part of an action involving a mine, and potentially additional mines, as well as 
the transport corridor and port. 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 17 of 41 

The Iron Road EPBC referral does not identify the Nauo, Barngarla, Wirangu and Mirning people as have been 
adequately engaged and the significant historical and cultural sites, such as women’s business and burial sites, which 
are not yet on the Aboriginal Register and have not been included and risk management determined. 
 
APPENDIX 
References: 
Hazards  of Heavy Metal Contamination 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14757716 
 
http://bmb.oxfordjournals.org/content/68/1/167.full 
 
Heavy metals and food contamination 
http://ec.europa.eu/food/food/chemicalsafety/contaminants/cadmium en.htm 
 
Toxic Effect of Heavy Metals in Livestock Health: Veterinary World, Vol 1(1) 28-32, 2008 
http://www.veterinaryworld.org/2008/January/Toxic.pdf 
 
Determination of contaminant levels in forage grasses, Dareta Village, Nigeria:  Archives of Applied Science Research, 
2013, 5(3):229-236 
http://scholarsresearchlibrary.com/aasr-vol5-iss3/AASR-2013-5-3-229-236.pdf 
(Google:  Heavy metal contamination in animals) 
Ninety First Report of the Natural Resources Committee, Whyalla Region Fact Finding Visit, 23-24 October 2013 (SA 
Parliamentary Committee, tabled Nov 2013) 
The Senate:  Community Affairs Reference Committee:  Impacts on health of air quality in Australia, August 2013 
Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining, Dust Control: Environment Australia, Department of 
Environment, 1998. 
Benshemesh, J. (2007). National Recovery Plan for Malleefowl. Department for Environment and Heritage, South 
Australia  
1
Freeman, et al (Malleefowl (Leipoa ocellata) Conservation on Eyre Peninsula, South Australia: Andrew Freeman ; 
2
Paula Peeters ; Graeme Tonkin)  
Google Earth 
Lazenby D: Literature Review and Report on Potential Health Impacts of Exposure to Crustal Material in Port 
Headland, pp52, 2007 
Link to Iron Road Definitive Feasibility Study (DFS) Report 
http://clients2.weblink.com.au/clients/ironroad/article.asp?asx=IRD&view=6668845 
 
Catherine Kemper PhD 
Curator and Senior Researcher, Mammals 
President, Australian Mammal Society (http://australianmammals.org.au/) 
South Australian Museum 
North Terrace, Adelaide, SA 5000 
P: +61 8 8207 7458  F: +61 8 8207 7222 
[email address] 
www.samuseum.sa.gov.au 
Australian Living Atlas https://www.ala.org.au/ 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 18 of 41 


DATA SOURCED FROM THE AUSTRALIAN LIVING ATLAS WITH RESPECT TO SIGHTINGS OF SOUTHERN RIGHT WHALE  
Location: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 19 of 41 


Eubalaena australis  
Southern Right Whale 
4 individuals recorded  
Observation: 2013-07-07  
Added: 1 year ago  
Lipson Cove, Spencer Gulf, South Australia 
Lat: -34.25579761767937 
Lng: 136.26462936401367 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 20 of 41 


Eubalaena australis  
Southern Right Whale 
4 individuals recorded  
Observation: 2013-07-08  
Added: 1 year ago  
Lipson Cove, Spencer Gulf, South Australia 
Lat: -34.2558685595284 
Lng: 136.26402854919434 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 21 of 41 


Eubalaena australis  
Southern Right Whale 
2 individuals recorded  
Observation: 2013-07-10  
Added: 1 year ago  
Lipson Cove / Lipson Island Conservation Park 
Lat: -34.25480442551197 
Lng: 136.2656593322754 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 22 of 41 


Eubalaena australis  
Southern Right Whale 
3 individuals recorded  
Observation: 2013-08-25  
Added: 11 months ago  
LOT 196 Swaffers Road, Lipson SA 5607, Australia 
Lat: -34.25501725339201 
Lng: 136.2656593322754 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 23 of 41 


Eubalaena australis  
Southern Right Whale 
Observation: 2014-06-01 16:53 
Added: 2 months ago  
LOT 196 Swaffers Road, Lipson SA 5607, Australia 
Lat: -34.25643609216708 
Lng: 136.2637710571289 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 24 of 41 


DATA SOURCED FROM THE AUSTRALIAN LIVING ATLAS WITH RESPECT TO SIGHTINGS OF THE WHITE BELLIED SEA 
EAGLE 

 
Haliaeetus (Pontoaetus) leucogaster  
White-bellied Sea-eagle 
Observation: 2014-07-04 10:00 
Added: 1 month ago  
LOT 196 Swaffers Road, Lipson SA 5607, Australia 
Lat: -34.253314615277446 
Lng: 136.26591682434082 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 25 of 41 


Haliaeetus (Pontoaetus) leucogaster  
White-bellied Sea-eagle 
2 individuals recorded  
Observation: 2014-06-16 11:48 
Added: 1 month ago  
Unnamed Road, Lipson SA 5607, Australia 
Lat: -34.25480442551197 
Lng: 136.26407146453857 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haliaeetus (Pontoaetus) leucogaster  
White-bellied Sea-eagle 
Observation: 2014-06-15  
Added: 1 month ago  
LOT 196 Swaffers Road, Lipson SA 5607, Australia 
Lat: -34.25343876713789 
Lng: 136.2647795677185 
Coord source: Google maps (no image) 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 26 of 41 


Haliaeetus (Pontoaetus) leucogaster  
White-bellied Sea-eagle 
Observation: 2014-05-24 16:47 
Added: 2 months ago  
LOT 196 Swaffers Road, Lipson SA 5607, Australia 
Lat: -34.25178930604142 
Lng: 136.2660026550293 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haliaeetus (Pontoaetus) leucogaster  
White-bellied Sea-eagle 
2 individuals recorded  
Observation: 2014-03-08  
Added: 4 months ago  
LOT 196 Swaffers Road, Lipson SA 5607, Australia 
Lat: -34.25551384968507 
Lng: 136.26583099365234 
Coord source: Google maps (no image) 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 27 of 41 


Haliaeetus (Pontoaetus) leucogaster  
White-bellied Sea-eagle 
Observation: 2013-07-16  
Added: 1 year ago  
Lipson Island Conservation Park 
Lat: -34.26374273291649 
Lng: 136.26651763916016 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 28 of 41 


Haliaeetus (Pontoaetus) leucogaster  
White-bellied Sea-eagle 
Observation: 2013-07-16  
Added: 1 year ago  
Lipson Cove 
Lat: -34.26175652445979 
Lng: 136.26171112060547 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 29 of 41 


Haliaeetus (Pontoaetus) leucogaster  
White-bellied Sea-eagle 
Observation: 2013-06-26  
Added: 1 year ago  
Lipson Cove 
Lat: -34.25920275895473 
Lng: 136.26102447509766 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 30 of 41 


Haliaeetus (Pontoaetus) leucogaster  
White-bellied Sea-eagle 
Observation: 2011-07-20 04:45 
 
Added: 1 year ago  
LOT 7 Lipson Cove Road, Lipson SA 5607, Australia 
Lat: -34.26331712076712 
Lng: 136.2587070465088 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 31 of 41 


Haliaeetus (Pontoaetus) leucogaster  
White-bellied Sea-eagle 
Observation: 2011-01-08 06:15 
Added: 1 year ago  
Between Lipson Cove and Rogers Beach 
Lat: -34.248135545897526 
Lng: 136.2682342529297 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 32 of 41 


Haliaeetus (Pontoaetus) leucogaster  
White-bellied Sea-eagle 
Observation: 2011-01-08 05:26 
Added: 1 year ago  
Rogers Beach 
Lat: -34.244446151396026 
Lng: 136.2685775756836 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 33 of 41 


Haliaeetus (Pontoaetus) leucogaster  
White-bellied Sea-eagle 
Observation: 2008-10-15 14:52 
 
Added: 1 year ago  
Lipson Cove 
Lat: -34.26204027139666 
Lng: 136.26617431640625 
Coord source: Google maps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 34 of 41 



Southern Right Whale Point Bolingbroke, South Australia 2013 
(This is a summary of the information collected) 
 
First seen washed up: 30 July 2013 
Reported: 30 July 2013 by Nathanial Staniford, Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources, South 
Australia 
Location: Point Bolingbroke, South Australia. Precise locality is 2.7 km NNE Point Bolingbroke, SA. 34º 31' 18.1" S, 
136 º 06' 00.5" E 
Collected: 2–8 August 2013 by David Stemmer, Ikuko Tomo, Mara Buss, Tania Cann, Garrie Rees, Sue and Robert 
Lawrie. 
SA Museum temporary accession number: 13.057 
Collected specimens: Full skeleton, two testes, left side of baleen, two ear plugs (formalin), kidney (formalin), 
cyamids (formalin), series of tissues fixed for pathology (liver, kidney, lung, skin wounds), series of tissues frozen for 
genetics, series of tissues frozen for toxic contaminants. 
State of decomposition: probably Geraci 2 when first washed up but deteriorated to Geraci 3 by the time of 
necropsy. 
Biological details 
Total length: 11.2 m 
Sex: male 
Age: Juvenile (skeleton physically immature, testes small, ~30 cm long) 
 
Callosity pattern: It was not possible to photograph the callosities until the carcass was pulled out of the water 
(numerous white pointer sharks around the carcass in the water!).  The photos taken may not be adequate for 
individual identification because the skin/callosities were damaged. 
 
Circumstance of death: Other Unintentional (vessel collision), according to SA Museum system for categorising 
circumstance of death for cetaceans.  The circumstance of death was assigned based on the severe, deep sub-dermal 
haemorrhaging (blunt trauma) and deep parallel injuries possibly consistent with propeller wounds. 
 
Pathology details 
A detailed pathology report has been prepared by Ikuko Tomo (attached).  This includes gross pathology findings and 
evidence for cause of death. 
 
Post Mortem Examination 
Southern right whale (Eubalaena australis) (SA Museum accession number 13.057) 
Reported: 30 July 2013 by Nat Staniford (DEWNR) 
Dissected:  3 -8 Aug 2013 
Place: Point Bolingbroke 
Juvenile male, 11.2 m body length 
 
Gross Macroscopic findings 
General body condition  
This juvenile male Southern right whale was in relatively good body condition. The blubber thickness on the dorsal 
surface was 15cm and 18cm on the ventral surface. Skin (epidermis) had started to peel off. 
 
There were multiple linear lacerations on the ventral posterior surface and left ventral anterior surface. Width of 
posterior ventral lacerations were around 30- 60cm, depth around 25 -40 cm. Width of anterior ventral lacerations 
were around 30cm, depth around 40-50cm.Those lacerations were almost parallel.  
 
There are multiple shark bites on the body. Sharks were around and an increase of bite marks had been observed by 
local people since the whale stranded on the beach. 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 36 of 41 



 
Lateral view with ventral side uppermost, showing multiple linear lacerations at posterior 
 
 
 
Lateral view with ventral side uppermost showing posterior area, four yellow linear lacerations. Parts of these 
wounds were probably caused by sharks. 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 37 of 41 



 
Posterior view with ventral side up 
 
 
Left lateral view with dorsal side up, showing two linear lacerations on the left ventral head anterior to the flipper, 
and several wounds  on the left side of the caudal peduncle (arrow:lacerations) 
Sub dermal and musculoskeletal system 
The muscles had started to softened and a small amount of gas had accumulated. 
The extensive subdermal haemorrhaging was found in the following places: 
1.  Centre of right mandible and maxilla (locally deep and severe)  and from the occipital bone  to anterior side 
of flipper (extensive and  severe) 
2.  Left  corner of mouth  to blowhole (locally severe) 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 38 of 41 



3.  Dorsal side from posterior of the blowhole to near tail flukes (severe at anterior,  mild towards posterior) 
4.  Left lateral side, from posterior of the flipper to near anus (extensive and  moderate) 
Some of the haemorrhaging extended as deep as bone 
1.  Centre of right maxilla (locally severe)  
2.  Centre of right mandible  
3.  Right side of occipital bone 
 
 
 
Dorsal middle of the body, part of blubber 
shows the sign of redness with muscle that 
had begun decomposing. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Right mandible showing redness on the bone surface (arrows: focal haemorrhaging) 
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 39 of 41 


 
Right occipital posterior view, showing redness on the right ventral 
occipital bone surface (arrow: focal haemorrhaging) 
 
Body cavities  
Organ positions appeared normal.  
The amount of fluid in the body cavities could not be determined because of seawater inflows. 
 
Liver  
No significant findings  
 
Stomach and intestines  
No significant findings  
No stomach contents were found. The intestine contained small amounts of yellow slimy material.  
 
Kidney  
No significant findings  
Lobular structure was good. Medulla cortex borders were defined. Interstitial connective tissues between lobes were 
slightly loose.  
Testes  
No significant findings  
Parenchyma was slightly soft.  
 
Trachea  
Mucous membrane was red.  
 
Lung  
Generally lung parenchyma was sunken and dark red. There was no exudative fluid from parenchyma, and the lungs 
contained a small amount of air. There was no froth in the bronchi.  
 
Heart  
No significant findings  
There was no blood in the heart.  
 
Pancreas, Spleen, Adrenal, Thyroid and Brain  
Not examined  
 
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 40 of 41 

Gross Macroscopic Diagnosis  
  Centre of right mandible and  rostrum: locally severe subdermal haemorrhaging extended to the bone 
surface 
  Right occipital process to anterior side of flipper: locally extensive severe subdermal haemorrhaging  
  Left maxillaries at the corner of mouth and near blowhole : locally extensive  severe subdermal 
haemorrhaging  
  Dorsal side of the body between blowhole and tail flukes: extensive  mild to  severe haemorrhaging, severe 
on anteriorly and mild on posteriorly 
  Left lateral body: moderate to severe subdermal haemorrhaging 
 
Comment  
Based on the reproductive organ size (Moore et al. 2004) and skeletal development, this animal is classified as 
juvenile.  
 
Multiple linear lacerations were found on the ventral posterior surface and left ventral anterior surface. Most of the 
laceration surfaces were scavenged and lost original shapes and size. The lacerations on the left neck area were 
associated with locally extensive subdermal haemorrhaging, indicating they may have occurred prior to death.  
 
Blunt trauma on the mandible, dorsal to left lateral trunk, appeared to have occurred prior to death. Because of the 
decomposition of this animal, acute inflammatory reaction urged muscle break down quickly. Additionally it should 
be noted that strong force applied by front-end loader  to place the whale on the beach prior to dissection, which 
may have caused further breakdown of the soft tissues. 
 
The nature of this trauma is not evident, however a very strong impact including vessel collision should be 
considered a distinct possibility. Northern right whales were reported their mortality and serious injury were often 
caused by human activities, particularly commercial fishing and shipping (Knowlton and Kraus 2001).  
 
Generally all organs I examined appeared to have no significant change. No infectious or inflammatory conditions 
were identified.  
 
Selective tissues will be examined by histopathology.  
 
Cause of death 
Extensive severe blunt trauma 
Ikuko Tomo B.V.Sc, M.V.Sc (Pathology)  
 
Literature cited 
Moore, M.J., Knowlton, A.M., Kraus, S.D., McLellan, W.A. and Bonde, R.K. (2004), Morphometry, gross morphology 
and available histopathology in North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) mortalities (1970 – 2002), Journal of 
Cetacean research Management 6(3), p 199-214 
Knowlton, A.R. and Kraus, S.D (2001), Mortality and serious injury of northern right whales(Eubalaena glacialis) in 
the western North Atlantic Ocean, Journal of Cetacean research Management 2, p193-20 
______________________________________________________________________________________________ 
“Whale Collisions Spark Calls for Ship Speed Limits in Australia  
Instances of gruesome whale collisions have prompted a conversation about whether to impose speed limits for 
ships along Australia's coast” 
http://time.com/3021736/whale-collision-australia-humpbacks-strikes/  
 
New ‘whale-spotting’ app created by marine scientists in hopes of helping cargo carriers avoid hitting sea creatures  
'Whale Spotter,' a new iPhone app, allows commercial boat captains to track and follow the movement of whales.  
The app was created in hopes of reducing the number of whales struck by vessels each year. 
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 
Wednesday, September 18, 2013, 4:12 PM 
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/whale-spotting-app-lets-commercial-sailors-track-sea-animals-
locations-article-1.1460123 
ANNEXURE 'A' EPBC Act Protected Matters Report
Tumby Bay Residents And Ratepayers Association Inc. 12/08/2014                                                                                        Page 41 of 41 


ANNEXURE 'A' EPBC Act Protected Matters Report



Extra Information
This part of the report provides information that may also be relevant to the area you have nominated.
Place on the RNE:
2
State and Territory Reserves:
4
Regional Forest Agreements:
None
Invasive Species:
22
Nationally Important Wetlands:
None
Key Ecological Features (Marine)
None
Details
Matters of National Environmental Significance
Listed Threatened Species
[ Resource Information ]
Name
Status
Type of Presence
Birds
Acanthiza iredalei  iredalei
Slender-billed Thornbill (western) [25967]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Diomedea exulans  antipodensis
Antipodean Albatross [82269]
Vulnerable
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour likely
to occur within area
Diomedea exulans  exulans
Tristan Albatross [82337]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Diomedea exulans (sensu lato)
Wandering Albatross [1073]
Vulnerable
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour likely
to occur within area
Halobaena caerulea
Blue Petrel [1059]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Leipoa ocellata
Malleefowl [934]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Macronectes giganteus
Southern Giant-Petrel [1060]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Macronectes halli
Northern Giant-Petrel [1061]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Pachycephala rufogularis
Red-lored Whistler [601]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Psophodes nigrogularis  leucogaster
Western Whipbird (eastern) [64448]
Vulnerable
Species or species

Name
Status
Type of Presence
habitat may occur within
area
Pterodroma mollis
Soft-plumaged Petrel [1036]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Rostratula australis
Australian Painted Snipe [77037]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Sternula nereis  nereis
Australian Fairy Tern [82950]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Thalassarche bulleri
Buller's Albatross [64460]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Thalassarche cauta  cauta
Shy Albatross, Tasmanian Shy Albatross [82345]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Thalassarche melanophris
Black-browed Albatross [66472]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Thalassarche melanophris  impavida
Campbell Albatross [82449]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Mammals
Balaenoptera musculus
Blue Whale [36]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Eubalaena australis
Southern Right Whale [40]
Endangered
Breeding known to occur
within area
Megaptera novaeangliae
Humpback Whale [38]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Neophoca cinerea
Australian Sea-lion [22]
Vulnerable
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour likely
to occur within area
Sminthopsis psammophila
Sandhill Dunnart [291]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Plants
Acacia enterocarpa
Jumping-jack Wattle [17615]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Acacia pinguifolia
Fat-leaved Wattle [5319]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Acacia rhetinocarpa
Neat Wattle, Resin Wattle (SA) [11282]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Caladenia tensa
Greencomb Spider-orchid, Rigid Spider-orchid
Endangered
Species or species
[24390]
habitat likely to occur
within area
Frankenia plicata
 [4225]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Prostanthera calycina
West Coast Mintbush, Limestone Mintbush, Red
Vulnerable
Species or species

Name
Status
Type of Presence
Mintbush [9470]
habitat likely to occur
within area
Ptilotus beckerianus
Ironstone Mulla Mulla [3787]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Pultenaea trichophylla
Tufted Bush-pea [12715]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Swainsona pyrophila
Yellow Swainson-pea [56344]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Reptiles
Caretta caretta
Loggerhead Turtle [1763]
Endangered
Breeding likely to occur
within area
Chelonia mydas
Green Turtle [1765]
Vulnerable
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour known
to occur within area
Dermochelys coriacea
Leatherback Turtle, Leathery Turtle, Luth [1768]
Endangered
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour known
to occur within area
Sharks
Carcharodon carcharias
Great White Shark [64470]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Listed Migratory Species
[ Resource Information ]
* Species is listed under a different scientific name on the EPBC Act - Threatened Species list.
Name
Threatened
Type of Presence
Migratory Marine Birds
Apus pacificus
Fork-tailed Swift [678]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Diomedea antipodensis
Antipodean Albatross [64458]
Vulnerable*
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour likely
to occur within area
Diomedea dabbenena
Tristan Albatross [66471]
Endangered*
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Diomedea exulans (sensu lato)
Wandering Albatross [1073]
Vulnerable
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour likely
to occur within area
Macronectes giganteus
Southern Giant-Petrel [1060]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Macronectes halli
Northern Giant-Petrel [1061]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Puffinus carneipes
Flesh-footed Shearwater, Fleshy-footed
Foraging, feeding or
Shearwater [1043]
related behaviour likely
to occur within area
Thalassarche bulleri
Buller's Albatross [64460]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Thalassarche cauta (sensu stricto)
Shy Albatross, Tasmanian Shy Albatross [64697]
Vulnerable*
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area

Name
Threatened
Type of Presence
Thalassarche impavida
Campbell Albatross [64459]
Vulnerable*
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Thalassarche melanophris
Black-browed Albatross [66472]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Migratory Marine Species
Balaenoptera edeni
Bryde's Whale [35]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Balaenoptera musculus
Blue Whale [36]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Caperea marginata
Pygmy Right Whale [39]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Carcharodon carcharias
Great White Shark [64470]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Caretta caretta
Loggerhead Turtle [1763]
Endangered
Breeding likely to occur
within area
Chelonia mydas
Green Turtle [1765]
Vulnerable
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour known
to occur within area
Dermochelys coriacea
Leatherback Turtle, Leathery Turtle, Luth [1768]
Endangered
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour known
to occur within area
Eubalaena australis
Southern Right Whale [40]
Endangered
Breeding known to occur
within area
Lagenorhynchus obscurus
Dusky Dolphin [43]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Lamna nasus
Porbeagle, Mackerel Shark [83288]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Megaptera novaeangliae
Humpback Whale [38]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Orcinus orca
Killer Whale, Orca [46]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Migratory Terrestrial Species
Haliaeetus leucogaster
White-bellied Sea-Eagle [943]
Species or species
habitat known to occur
within area
Leipoa ocellata
Malleefowl [934]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Merops ornatus
Rainbow Bee-eater [670]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Migratory Wetlands Species
Ardea alba
Great Egret, White Egret [59541]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area

Name
Threatened
Type of Presence
Ardea ibis
Cattle Egret [59542]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Charadrius veredus
Oriental Plover, Oriental Dotterel [882]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Gallinago hardwickii
Latham's Snipe, Japanese Snipe [863]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Rostratula benghalensis (sensu lato)
Painted Snipe [889]
Endangered*
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Other Matters Protected by the EPBC Act
Listed Marine Species
[ Resource Information ]
* Species is listed under a different scientific name on the EPBC Act - Threatened Species list.
Name
Threatened
Type of Presence
Birds
Apus pacificus
Fork-tailed Swift [678]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Ardea alba
Great Egret, White Egret [59541]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Ardea ibis
Cattle Egret [59542]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Catharacta skua
Great Skua [59472]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Charadrius veredus
Oriental Plover, Oriental Dotterel [882]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Diomedea antipodensis
Antipodean Albatross [64458]
Vulnerable*
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour likely
to occur within area
Diomedea dabbenena
Tristan Albatross [66471]
Endangered*
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Diomedea exulans (sensu lato)
Wandering Albatross [1073]
Vulnerable
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour likely
to occur within area
Gallinago hardwickii
Latham's Snipe, Japanese Snipe [863]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Haliaeetus leucogaster
White-bellied Sea-Eagle [943]
Species or species
habitat known to occur
within area

Name
Threatened
Type of Presence
Halobaena caerulea
Blue Petrel [1059]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Macronectes giganteus
Southern Giant-Petrel [1060]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Macronectes halli
Northern Giant-Petrel [1061]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Merops ornatus
Rainbow Bee-eater [670]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Pandion haliaetus
Osprey [952]
Species or species
habitat known to occur
within area
Phalacrocorax fuscescens
Black-faced Cormorant [59660]
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour likely
to occur within area
Pterodroma mollis
Soft-plumaged Petrel [1036]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Puffinus carneipes
Flesh-footed Shearwater, Fleshy-footed
Foraging, feeding or
Shearwater [1043]
related behaviour likely
to occur within area
Rostratula benghalensis (sensu lato)
Painted Snipe [889]
Endangered*
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Thalassarche bulleri
Buller's Albatross [64460]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Thalassarche cauta (sensu stricto)
Shy Albatross, Tasmanian Shy Albatross [64697]
Vulnerable*
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Thalassarche impavida
Campbell Albatross [64459]
Vulnerable*
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Thalassarche melanophris
Black-browed Albatross [66472]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Thinornis rubricollis  rubricollis
Hooded Plover (eastern) [66726]
Species or species
habitat known to occur
within area
Fish
Acentronura australe
Southern Pygmy Pipehorse [66185]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Campichthys tryoni
Tryon's Pipefish [66193]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Filicampus tigris
Tiger Pipefish [66217]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Heraldia nocturna
Upside-down Pipefish, Eastern Upside-down
Species or species
Pipefish, Eastern Upside-down Pipefish [66227]
habitat may occur within
area

Name
Threatened
Type of Presence
Hippocampus breviceps
Short-head Seahorse, Short-snouted Seahorse
Species or species
[66235]
habitat may occur within
area
Histiogamphelus cristatus
Rhino Pipefish, Macleay's Crested Pipefish, Ring-
Species or species
back Pipefish [66243]
habitat may occur within
area
Hypselognathus rostratus
Knifesnout Pipefish, Knife-snouted Pipefish
Species or species
[66245]
habitat may occur within
area
Kaupus costatus
Deepbody Pipefish, Deep-bodied Pipefish [66246]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Leptoichthys fistularius
Brushtail Pipefish [66248]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Lissocampus caudalis
Australian Smooth Pipefish, Smooth Pipefish
Species or species
[66249]
habitat may occur within
area
Lissocampus runa
Javelin Pipefish [66251]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Maroubra perserrata
Sawtooth Pipefish [66252]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Notiocampus ruber
Red Pipefish [66265]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Phycodurus eques
Leafy Seadragon [66267]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Phyllopteryx taeniolatus
Common Seadragon, Weedy Seadragon [66268]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Pugnaso curtirostris
Pugnose Pipefish, Pug-nosed Pipefish [66269]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Solegnathus robustus
Robust Pipehorse, Robust Spiny Pipehorse
Species or species
[66274]
habitat may occur within
area
Stigmatopora argus
Spotted Pipefish, Gulf Pipefish [66276]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Stigmatopora nigra
Widebody Pipefish, Wide-bodied Pipefish, Black
Species or species
Pipefish [66277]
habitat may occur within
area
Stipecampus cristatus
Ringback Pipefish, Ring-backed Pipefish [66278]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Urocampus carinirostris
Hairy Pipefish [66282]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Vanacampus margaritifer
Mother-of-pearl Pipefish [66283]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area

Name
Threatened
Type of Presence
Vanacampus phillipi
Port Phillip Pipefish [66284]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Vanacampus poecilolaemus
Longsnout Pipefish, Australian Long-snout
Species or species
Pipefish, Long-snouted Pipefish [66285]
habitat may occur within
area
Vanacampus vercoi
Verco's Pipefish [66286]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Mammals
Arctocephalus forsteri
New Zealand Fur-seal [20]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Arctocephalus pusillus
Australian Fur-seal, Australo-African Fur-seal
Species or species
[21]
habitat may occur within
area
Neophoca cinerea
Australian Sea-lion [22]
Vulnerable
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour likely
to occur within area
Reptiles
Caretta caretta
Loggerhead Turtle [1763]
Endangered
Breeding likely to occur
within area
Chelonia mydas
Green Turtle [1765]
Vulnerable
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour known
to occur within area
Dermochelys coriacea
Leatherback Turtle, Leathery Turtle, Luth [1768]
Endangered
Foraging, feeding or
related behaviour known
to occur within area
Whales and other Cetaceans
[ Resource Information ]
Name
Status
Type of Presence
Mammals
Balaenoptera acutorostrata
Minke Whale [33]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Balaenoptera edeni
Bryde's Whale [35]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Balaenoptera musculus
Blue Whale [36]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Caperea marginata
Pygmy Right Whale [39]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Delphinus delphis
Common Dophin, Short-beaked Common
Species or species
Dolphin [60]
habitat may occur within
area
Eubalaena australis
Southern Right Whale [40]
Endangered
Breeding known to occur
within area
Grampus griseus
Risso's Dolphin, Grampus [64]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Lagenorhynchus obscurus
Dusky Dolphin [43]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area

Name
Status
Type of Presence
Megaptera novaeangliae
Humpback Whale [38]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Orcinus orca
Killer Whale, Orca [46]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Tursiops aduncus
Indian Ocean Bottlenose Dolphin, Spotted
Species or species
Bottlenose Dolphin [68418]
habitat likely to occur
within area
Tursiops truncatus s. str.
Bottlenose Dolphin [68417]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Extra Information
Places on the RNE
[ Resource Information ]
Note that not all Indigenous sites may be listed.
Name
State
Status
Natural
Darke Range
SA
Registered
Hambidge Conservation Park
SA
Registered
State and Territory Reserves
[ Resource Information ]
Name
State
Hambidge
SA
Port Neill
SA
Tumby Bay To Dutton Bay
SA
Unnamed (No.HA625)
SA
Invasive Species
[ Resource Information ]
Weeds reported here are the 20 species of national significance (WoNS), along with other introduced
plants that are considered by the States and Territories to pose a particularly significant threat to
biodiversity. The following feral animals are reported: Goat, Red Fox, Cat, Rabbit, Pig, Water Buffalo
and Cane Toad. Maps from Landscape Health Project, National Land and Water Resouces Audit,
2001.
Name
Status
Type of Presence
Birds
Alauda arvensis
Skylark [656]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Carduelis carduelis
European Goldfinch [403]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Columba livia
Rock Pigeon, Rock Dove, Domestic Pigeon [803]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Passer domesticus
House Sparrow [405]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Streptopelia chinensis
Spotted Turtle-Dove  [780]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Sturnus vulgaris
Common Starling [389]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur

Name
Status
Type of Presence
within area
Turdus merula
Common Blackbird, Eurasian Blackbird [596]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Mammals
Capra hircus
Goat [2]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Felis catus
Cat, House Cat, Domestic Cat [19]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Mus musculus
House Mouse [120]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Oryctolagus cuniculus
Rabbit, European Rabbit [128]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Vulpes vulpes
Red Fox, Fox [18]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Plants
Asparagus asparagoides
Bridal Creeper, Bridal Veil Creeper, Smilax,
Species or species
Florist's Smilax, Smilax Asparagus [22473]
habitat likely to occur
within area
Carrichtera annua
Ward's Weed [9511]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Chrysanthemoides monilifera
Bitou Bush, Boneseed [18983]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera
Boneseed [16905]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Lycium ferocissimum
African Boxthorn, Boxthorn [19235]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Olea europaea
Olive, Common Olive [9160]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Opuntia spp.
Prickly Pears [82753]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Rubus fruticosus aggregate
Blackberry, European Blackberry [68406]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Solanum elaeagnifolium
Silver Nightshade, Silver-leaved Nightshade,
Species or species
White Horse Nettle, Silver-leaf Nightshade,
habitat likely to occur
Tomato Weed, White Nightshade, Bull-nettle,
within area
Prairie-berry, Satansbos, Silver-leaf Bitter-apple,
Silverleaf-nettle, Trompillo [12323]
Ulex europaeus
Gorse, Furze [7693]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area



Acknowledgements
This database has been compiled from a range of data sources. The department acknowledges the
following custodians who have contributed valuable data and advice:
-Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water, New South Wales
-Department of Sustainability and Environment, Victoria
-Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, Tasmania
-Department of Environment and Natural Resources, South Australia
-Parks and Wildlife Service NT, NT Dept of Natural Resources, Environment and the Arts
-Environmental and Resource Management, Queensland
-Department of Environment and Conservation, Western Australia
-Department of the Environment, Climate Change, Energy and Water
-Birds Australia
-Australian Bird and Bat Banding Scheme
-Australian National Wildlife Collection
-Natural history museums of Australia
-Museum Victoria
-Australian Museum
-SA Museum
-Queensland Museum
-Online Zoological Collections of Australian Museums
-Queensland Herbarium
-National Herbarium of NSW
-Royal Botanic Gardens and National Herbarium of Victoria
-Tasmanian Herbarium
-State Herbarium of South Australia
-Northern Territory Herbarium
-Western Australian Herbarium
-Australian National Herbarium, Atherton and Canberra
-University of New England
-Ocean Biogeographic Information System
-Australian Government, Department of Defence
-State Forests of NSW
-Geoscience Australia
-CSIRO
-Other groups and individuals
The Department is extremely grateful to the many organisations and individuals who provided
expert advice and information on numerous draft distributions.
Please feel free to provide feedback via the Contact Us page.
© Commonwealth of Australia
Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities
GPO Box 787
Canberra ACT 2601 Australia
+61 2 6274 1111





EPBC Act Protected Matters Report
This report provides general guidance on matters of national environmental significance and other
matters protected by the EPBC Act in the area you have selected.
Information on the coverage of this report and qualifications on data supporting this report are
contained in the caveat at the end of the report.
Information is available about Environment Assessments and the EPBC Act including significance
guidelines, forms and application process details.
Report created: 08/07/14 16:18:45
Summary
Details

Matters of NES
Other Matters Protected by the EPBC Act
Extra Information

Caveat
Acknowledgements

This map may contain data which are
©Commonwealth of Australia
(Geoscience Australia), ©PSMA 2010
Coordinates
Buffer: 5.0Km


Summary
Matters of National Environmental Significance
This part of the report summarises the matters of national environmental significance that may occur
in, or may relate to, the area you nominated. Further information is available in the detail part of the
report, which can be accessed by scrolling or following the links below. If you are proposing to
undertake an activity that may have a significant impact on one or more matters of national
environmental significance then you should consider the Administrative Guidelines on Significance.
World Heritage Properties:
None
National Heritage Places:
None
Wetlands of International Importance:
None
Great Barrier Reef Marine Park:
None
Commonwealth Marine Areas:
None
Listed Threatened Ecological Communities:
1
Listed Threatened Species:
6
Listed Migratory Species:
7
Other Matters Protected by the EPBC Act
This part of the report summarises other matters protected under the Act that may relate to the area
you nominated. Approval may be required for a proposed activity that significantly affects the
environment on Commonwealth land, when the action is outside the Commonwealth land, or the
environment anywhere when the action is taken on Commonwealth land. Approval may also be
required for the Commonwealth or Commonwealth agencies proposing to take an action that is likely
to have a significant impact on the environment anywhere.
The EPBC Act protects the environment on Commonwealth land, the environment from the actions
taken on Commonwealth land, and the environment from actions taken by Commonwealth agencies.
As heritage values of a place are part of the 'environment', these aspects of the EPBC Act protect the
Commonwealth Heritage values of a Commonwealth Heritage place and the heritage values of a
place on the Register of the National Estate.
This part of the report summarises other matters protected under the Act that may relate to the area
you nominated. Approval may be required for a proposed activity that significantly affects the
environment on Commonwealth land, when the action is outside the Commonwealth land, or the
environment anywhere when the action is taken on Commonwealth land. Approval may also be
required for the Commonwealth or Commonwealth agencies proposing to take an action that is likely
to have a significant impact on the environment anywhere.
A permit may be required for activities in or on a Commonwealth area that may affect a member of a
listed threatened species or ecological community, a member of a listed migratory species, whales
and other cetaceans, or a member of a listed marine species.
Commonwealth Land:
None
Commonwealth Heritage Places:
None
Listed Marine Species:
8
Whales and Other Cetaceans:
None
Critical Habitats:
None
Commonwealth Reserves Terrestrial:
None
Commonwealth Reserves Marine
None

Extra Information
This part of the report provides information that may also be relevant to the area you have nominated.
Place on the RNE:
None
State and Territory Reserves:
None
Regional Forest Agreements:
None
Invasive Species:
14
Nationally Important Wetlands:
None
Key Ecological Features (Marine)
None
Details
Matters of National Environmental Significance
Listed Threatened Ecological Communities
[ Resource Information ]
For threatened ecological communities where the distribution is well known, maps are derived from
recovery plans, State vegetation maps, remote sensing imagery and other sources. Where threatened
ecological community distributions are less well known, existing vegetation maps and point location
data are used to produce indicative distribution maps.
Name
Status
Type of Presence
Eyre Peninsula Blue Gum (Eucalyptus petiolaris)
Endangered
Community may occur
Woodland
within area
Listed Threatened Species
[ Resource Information ]
Name
Status
Type of Presence
Birds
Leipoa ocellata
Malleefowl [934]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Pachycephala rufogularis
Red-lored Whistler [601]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Mammals
Sminthopsis psammophila
Sandhill Dunnart [291]
Endangered
Species or species
habitat known to occur
within area
Plants
Caladenia tensa
Greencomb Spider-orchid, Rigid Spider-orchid
Endangered
Species or species
[24390]
habitat likely to occur
within area
Olearia pannosa subsp. pannosa
Silver Daisy-bush [12348]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Swainsona pyrophila
Yellow Swainson-pea [56344]
Vulnerable
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Listed Migratory Species
[ Resource Information ]
* Species is listed under a different scientific name on the EPBC Act - Threatened Species list.
Name
Threatened
Type of Presence

Name
Threatened
Type of Presence
Migratory Marine Birds
Apus pacificus
Fork-tailed Swift [678]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Migratory Terrestrial Species
Haliaeetus leucogaster
White-bellied Sea-Eagle [943]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Merops ornatus
Rainbow Bee-eater [670]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Migratory Wetlands Species
Ardea alba
Great Egret, White Egret [59541]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Ardea ibis
Cattle Egret [59542]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Charadrius veredus
Oriental Plover, Oriental Dotterel [882]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Gallinago hardwickii
Latham's Snipe, Japanese Snipe [863]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Other Matters Protected by the EPBC Act
Listed Marine Species
[ Resource Information ]
* Species is listed under a different scientific name on the EPBC Act - Threatened Species list.
Name
Threatened
Type of Presence
Birds
Apus pacificus
Fork-tailed Swift [678]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Ardea alba
Great Egret, White Egret [59541]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Ardea ibis
Cattle Egret [59542]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Charadrius veredus
Oriental Plover, Oriental Dotterel [882]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Gallinago hardwickii
Latham's Snipe, Japanese Snipe [863]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Haliaeetus leucogaster
White-bellied Sea-Eagle [943]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Merops ornatus
Rainbow Bee-eater [670]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Pandion haliaetus
Osprey [952]
Species or species

Name
Threatened
Type of Presence
habitat may occur within
area
Extra Information
Invasive Species
[ Resource Information ]
Weeds reported here are the 20 species of national significance (WoNS), along with other introduced
plants that are considered by the States and Territories to pose a particularly significant threat to
biodiversity. The following feral animals are reported: Goat, Red Fox, Cat, Rabbit, Pig, Water Buffalo
and Cane Toad. Maps from Landscape Health Project, National Land and Water Resouces Audit,
2001.
Name
Status
Type of Presence
Birds
Alauda arvensis
Skylark [656]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Carduelis carduelis
European Goldfinch [403]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Columba livia
Rock Pigeon, Rock Dove, Domestic Pigeon [803]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Passer domesticus
House Sparrow [405]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Sturnus vulgaris
Common Starling [389]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Turdus merula
Common Blackbird, Eurasian Blackbird [596]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Mammals
Felis catus
Cat, House Cat, Domestic Cat [19]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Mus musculus
House Mouse [120]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Oryctolagus cuniculus
Rabbit, European Rabbit [128]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Vulpes vulpes
Red Fox, Fox [18]
Species or species

Name
Status
Type of Presence
habitat likely to occur
within area
Plants
Asparagus asparagoides
Bridal Creeper, Bridal Veil Creeper, Smilax,
Species or species
Florist's Smilax, Smilax Asparagus [22473]
habitat likely to occur
within area
Carrichtera annua
Ward's Weed [9511]
Species or species
habitat may occur within
area
Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera
Boneseed [16905]
Species or species
habitat likely to occur
within area
Solanum elaeagnifolium
Silver Nightshade, Silver-leaved Nightshade,
Species or species
White Horse Nettle, Silver-leaf Nightshade,
habitat likely to occur
Tomato Weed, White Nightshade, Bull-nettle,
within area
Prairie-berry, Satansbos, Silver-leaf Bitter-apple,
Silverleaf-nettle, Trompillo [12323]

Coordinates
-33.576507 136.011644,-33.580333 136.0319,-33.587304 136.043402,-33.600567 136.016966,
-33.559414 136.100522,-33.567568 136.12434,-33.568748 136.148072,-33.568748
136.148072,-33.568712 136.148029
Caveat
The information presented in this report has been provided by a range of data sources as acknowledged at
the end of the report.
This report is designed to assist in identifying the locations of places which may be relevant in determining
obligations under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. It holds mapped
locations of World Heritage and Register of National Estate properties, Wetlands of International
Importance, Commonwealth and State/Territory reserves, listed threatened, migratory and marine species
and listed threatened ecological communities. Mapping of Commonwealth land is not complete at this
stage. Maps have been collated from a range of sources at various resolutions.
Not all species listed under the EPBC Act have been mapped (see below) and therefore a report is a general
guide only. Where available data supports mapping, the type of presence that can be determined from the
data is indicated in general terms. People using this information in making a referral may need to consider
the qualifications below and may need to seek and consider other information sources.
For threatened ecological communities where the distribution is well known, maps are derived from
recovery plans, State vegetation maps, remote sensing imagery and other sources. Where threatened
ecological community distributions are less well known, existing vegetation maps and point location data
are used to produce indicative distribution maps.
For species where the distributions are well known, maps are digitised from sources such as recovery plans
and detailed habitat studies. Where appropriate, core breeding, foraging and roosting areas are indicated
under 'type of presence'. For species whose distributions are less well known, point locations are collated
from government wildlife authorities, museums, and non-government organisations; bioclimatic
distribution models are generated and these validated by experts. In some cases, the distribution maps are
based solely on expert knowledge.
Only selected species covered by the following provisions of the EPBC Act have been mapped:
- migratory and
- marine
The following species and ecological communities have not been mapped and do not appear in reports
produced from this database:
- threatened species listed as extinct or considered as vagrants
- some species and ecological communities that have only recently been listed
- some terrestrial species that overfly the Commonwealth marine area
- migratory species that are very widespread, vagrant, or only occur in small numbers
The following groups have been mapped, but may not cover the complete distribution of the species:
- non-threatened seabirds which have only been mapped for recorded breeding sites
- seals which have only been mapped for breeding sites near the Australian continent
Such breeding sites may be important for the protection of the Commonwealth Marine environment.

Acknowledgements
This database has been compiled from a range of data sources. The department acknowledges the
following custodians who have contributed valuable data and advice:
-Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water, New South Wales
-Department of Sustainability and Environment, Victoria
-Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, Tasmania
-Department of Environment and Natural Resources, South Australia
-Parks and Wildlife Service NT, NT Dept of Natural Resources, Environment and the Arts
-Environmental and Resource Management, Queensland
-Department of Environment and Conservation, Western Australia
-Department of the Environment, Climate Change, Energy and Water
-Birds Australia
-Australian Bird and Bat Banding Scheme
-Australian National Wildlife Collection
-Natural history museums of Australia
-Museum Victoria
-Australian Museum
-SA Museum
-Queensland Museum
-Online Zoological Collections of Australian Museums
-Queensland Herbarium
-National Herbarium of NSW
-Royal Botanic Gardens and National Herbarium of Victoria
-Tasmanian Herbarium
-State Herbarium of South Australia
-Northern Territory Herbarium
-Western Australian Herbarium
-Australian National Herbarium, Atherton and Canberra
-University of New England
-Ocean Biogeographic Information System
-Australian Government, Department of Defence
-State Forests of NSW
-Geoscience Australia
-CSIRO
-Other groups and individuals
The Department is extremely grateful to the many organisations and individuals who provided
expert advice and information on numerous draft distributions.
Please feel free to provide feedback via the Contact Us page.
© Commonwealth of Australia
Department of the Environment
GPO Box 787
Canberra ACT 2601 Australia
+61 2 6274 1111