This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request '.au Historical Financial Irregularities'.


 
Mr Ron Andruff 
Right to Know (via email: f[email address]
 
17 November 2017 
 
Dear Mr Andruff 
 
Freedom of Information Request FOI 20‐1718 – Notice of Access Decision 
I refer to your email of 15 September 2017 to the Department of Communications and the Arts 
(the  Department)  requesting  access  to  documents  under  section 15  of  the  Freedom  of 
Information Act 1982
 (FOI Act). 
 
I  am  an  officer  authorised  by  the  Secretary  under  subsection 23(1)  of  the  FOI  Act  to  make 
decisions about requests for access to documents under the FOI Act. 
 
I have made a decision on your request, and provide you with notice in writing of my decision. 
A. 
BACKGROUND 
1. 
On 15 September 2017, you requested access to documents under section 15 of the FOI 
Act. These documents are: 
“…•  a copy of the PPB Report; 
•  copies of any findings or reports relating to "the under‐reporting of FBT to the ATO" 
as noted in item 4(a) of the minutes of the Board meeting held on 13 February 2017;  

• internal meeting minutes or any other record (in any form) of matters discussed at in‐
camera discussions held during auDA's board meeting on 24 March 2016 relating to 
the termination of the ex‐CEO Chris Disspain (excluding the board minutes dated 24 
March 2016 which are published on the auDA website); and  

• copies of any reports or other records relating to expenses incurred by the ex‐CEO 
Chris Disspain during the period(s) the subject of the PPB Review and rational for 
extensive international travel and explanation of benefit to auDA and the Australian 
public in general…” 

2. 
On 21 September 2017, the Department acknowledged your request. 
3. 
On 3 October 2017, the First Assistant Secretary Arts advised the FOI Coordinator that 
searches had identified documents in accordance with your request. This advice also stated that 
GPO Box 2154 Canberra ACT 2601 Australia  telephone 02 6271 1000  website communications.gov.au  
arts.gov.au 

 
the documents contained information that may be exempt from disclosure under the FOI Act, and 
that the Department may need to consult third parties potentially affected by disclosure. 
4. 
The  requested  documents,  identified  through  searches  of  departmental  electronic 
document  management,  email  and  parliamentary  correspondence  systems,  are  listed  in  the 
Schedule of Documents at Attachment A. 
5. 
On 6 October 2017, the Department gave you notice that you are liable to pay a charge 
under section 29 of the FOI Act, and provided a preliminary charge assessment of $225.72. As this 
amount exceeds $100, you must pay a deposit of 25 per cent ($56.43). 
6. 
The  Department  received  your  payment  by  direct  debit  on  18 October 2017.  On 
19 October 2017,  the  Department  sent  you  Receipt  No.  8811391  (dated  18 October 2017)  for 
payment of a deposit  of $56.43 and notified you of the extension of the processing period to 
consult third parties potentially affected by disclosure. 
7. 
On  26 October 2017,  the  Department  initiated  external  consultation  with  an  affected 
third party under section 27 of the FOI Act. 
8. 
On  3 November 2017,  the Department received a request from the third party for an 
extension  of  time  to  respond  to  the  consultation  request.  On  the  same  day,  the  Department 
received notice of approval of the Department’s request for an extension of the processing period 
under section 15AB of the FOI Act. 
9. 
On  14 November 2017,  the  Department  received  exemption  contentions  from  the 
affected third party (I will refer to this as Contention 1). 
10. 
On  15 November 2017,  in  response  to  an  internal  consultation  request,  the  First 
Assistant Secretary Arts advised the FOI Coordinator: 
“… the Department’s working relationship with auDA and our role as observer on the 
auDA board relies on access to information which the auDA board would reasonably 
expect to remain confidential. This is particularly important at this time as the 
Department commences a review of auDA on behalf of the Minister.” 

B. 
DECISION 
11. 
I have decided to refuse to give access to the documents you requested as follows: 
a. 
documents number 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9 and 12 in part are exempt under section 22 of 
the  FOI  Act,  and  an  edited  copy  cannot  be  prepared  with  the  exempt  material 
deleted, to which access would be required to be given by section 11A of the FOI 
Act; 
b. 
documents number 1, 3, 9 and 13 in part and documents number 10 and 11 in full 
are exempt under section 42 of the FOI Act, and an edited copy cannot be prepared 
with the exempt material deleted, to which access would be required to be given 
by section 11A of the FOI Act; 
 


 
c. 
document number 9 in part is exempt under section 47C of the FOI  Act, and an 
edited copy cannot be prepared with the exempt material deleted, to which access 
would be required to be given by section 11A of the FOI Act; 
d. 
documents  number 1,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  12  and  13  in  part  are  exempt  under 
section 47F of the FOI Act, and an edited copy cannot be prepared with the exempt 
material deleted, to which access would be required to be given by section 11A of 
the FOI Act; and 
e. 
documents number 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 in full are exempt under 
section 47G of the FOI Act. 
C. 
MATERIAL ON WHICH MY DECISION IS BASED 
12. 
I base my decision on the following material: 
a. 
your access request, dated 15 September 2017; 
b. 
the documents identified by the Department as relevant to your access request; 
c. 
the relevant provisions of the FOI Act; 
d. 
the Australian Information Commissioner’s FOI Guidelines made under section 93A 
of the FOI Act (the ‘FOI Guidelines’); 
e. 
relevant case law; 
f. 
the Department’s FOI Policy
g. 
information and advice from the Department’s FOI Coordinator; 
h. 
information and advice from officers within the Department’s Arts Division; and 
i. 
exemption contentions made by third parties potentially affected by the decision. 
D. 
FINDINGS ON MATERIAL QUESTIONS OF FACT 
13. 
I  find  that  the  requested  documents,  identified  through  searches  of  departmental 
electronic document management and email systems, are listed in the Schedule of Documents at 
Attachment A. 
E. 
REASONS FOR DECISION 
Section 22 – Deletion of Exempt or Irrelevant Material 
14. 
Section 22 of the FOI Act provides that if the Department decides to refuse to give access 
to an exempt document, or that to give access to a document would disclose information that 
would reasonably be regarded as irrelevant to the request for access, then, where it is possible 
and reasonably practicable to prepare an edited copy of the document modified by deletions, 
then the Department must prepare and give you access to that edited copy. 
 


 
15. 
I find that the following documents would disclose information that would reasonably 
be regarded as irrelevant to your request: 
a. 
documents  number 1,  4,  5,  6,  9  and  12  in  part  contain  personal  identifying 
information that you agreed to exclude from your request, such as the names and 
contact details of non‐SES departmental officers; and 
b. 
document number 2 in part contains information that is not in accordance with 
your request. 
Section 42 – Exemption – Legal professional privilege 
16. 
I  have  considered  whether  documents  in  accordance  with your  request  are  of  such  a 
nature that they would be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal 
professional privilege. If so, the documents would be exempt under section 42 of the FOI Act. 
17. 
Contention 1 claimed that documents number 10 and 11 are exempt from disclosure on 
this basis, and provided specific examples of the potential impact of disclosure. 
18. 
I have examined the documents and find that documents number 1, 3, 9 and 13 in part 
and  documents  number 10  and  11  in  full  are  documents  containing  material  that  would  be 
privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege. 
19. 
As such, documents number 1, 3, 9 and 13 in part and documents number 10 and 11 in 
full are exempt from disclosure under the FOI Act. 
Section 47C – Public interest conditional exemption – Deliberative processes 
20. 
I have considered whether disclosure under the FOI Act of the documents in accordance 
with  your  request  would  disclose  matter  in  the  nature  of,  or  relating  to,  opinion,  advice  or 
recommendation obtained, prepared or recorded, or consultation or deliberation that has taken 
place, in the course of, or for the purposes of, the deliberative processes involved in the functions 
of an agency. If so, the documents would be conditionally exempt documents under section 47C 
of the FOI Act. 
21. 
The FOI Guidelines at paragraphs 6.52‐6.88 provide guidance on the application of this 
conditional exemption. 
22. 
I have examined the documents and find that document number 9 in part is a document 
containing opinion, advice and a recommendation prepared in the course of, or for the purposes 
of,  the  deliberative  processes  involved  in  the  functions  of  an  agency;  namely,  departmental 
involvement in Internet governance and domain name administration. 
23. 
The FOI Guidelines at paragraphs 6.60 state that “the functions of an agency are usually 
found in the Administrative Arrangements Orders or the instrument or Act that established the 
agency”. In this case, Internet governance and domain name administration is within the meaning 
of the term “postal and telecommunications policies and programmes”, which is a matter dealt 
with  by  the  Department  of  Communications  and  the  Arts  (see  Administrative  Arrangements 
Orders dated 1 September 2016, C2017Q00008). 
 


 
24. 
I  am  therefore  satisfied  that  the  relevant  part  of  document  number 9  contains 
deliberative matter and is conditionally exempt under section 47C of the FOI Act. 
Application of the public interest test 
25. 
This conditional exemption requires application of the public interest test. 
Public interest factors in favour of disclosure 
26. 
Factors favouring access to the document in the public interest include whether access 
to the document would: 
a. 
promote the objects of the FOI Act (set out at section 3); 
b. 
inform debate on a matter of public importance; 
c. 
promote effective oversight of public expenditure; 
d. 
allow a person to access his or her own personal information. 
27. 
Applying these considerations to the relevant parts of document number 9: 
a. 
disclosure of this part of the document would promote the objects of the FOI Act, 
but only to a limited extent; 
b. 
disclosure of this part of the document would inform debate on a matter of public 
importance (Internet governance and domain name administration), but only to a 
limited extent; 
c. 
disclosure of this part of the document would not promote effective oversight of 
public expenditure, as it does not relate to public expenditure; and 
d. 
disclosure of this part of the document would not allow a person to access his or 
her own personal information, as it does not pertain to any personal information. 
Public interest factors against disclosure 
28. 
The  FOI  Guidelines  at  paragraph 6.22  set  out  a  non‐exhaustive  list  of  factors  against 
disclosure. 
29. 
It  is  relevant  that  the  deliberative  material  in  question  itself  substantially  consists  of 
information that is otherwise conditionally exempt under section 47F and/or section 47G of the 
FOI Act. 
30. 
I have taken into account the following public interest factors against disclosure: 
a. 
disclosure  of  the  information  could  reasonably  be  expected  to  prejudice  the 
protection of an individual’s right to privacy without providing a right to correct 
the information or a right of response to the opinion; 
 


 
b. 
disclosure of the information could reasonably be expected to prejudice the fair 
treatment  of  individuals  to  the  extent  that  the  information  is  about 
unsubstantiated  allegations  of  misconduct  or  unlawful,  negligent  or  improper 
conduct; 
c. 
disclosure could reasonably be expected to prejudice the Department’s ability to 
obtain confidential information from the affected third party and generally; 
d. 
disclosure could reasonably be expected to prejudice the Department’s ability to 
obtain similar information in future from the affected third party and generally; 
and 
e. 
disclosure of the information could reasonably be expected to harm the interests 
of an individual or group of individuals named in the document. 
31. 
The  FOI  Guidelines  at  paragraphs  6.55‐6.56  discuss  the  assessment  of  ‘harm  resulting 
from disclosure’ in the context of the public interest factors. Disclosure of the relevant part of 
document number 9 would have similar harm to that outlined in my consideration of section 47F 
and section 47G. 
Irrelevant factors 
32. 
Subsection 11B(4) of the FOI Act sets out factors that I must not take into account in 
applying the public interest test to the above identified conditional exemptions. 
33. 
I have not taken these irrelevant factors into account in making my decision. 
Balancing public interest factors 
34. 
There are limited public interest factors in favour of disclosure. 
35. 
On the other hand, there are strong public interest factors against disclosure. 
36. 
Weighing all factors, I find that on balance, disclosure of the relevant part of document 
number 9 would not be in the public interest and therefore that the material is exempt under 
section 47C of the FOI Act. 
Section 47F – Public interest conditional exemption – Personal privacy 
37. 
I have considered whether disclosure under the FOI Act of the documents in accordance 
with your request would involve the unreasonable disclosure of personal information about any 
person  (including  a  deceased  person).  If  so,  the  documents  would  be  conditionally  exempt 
documents under section 47F of the FOI Act. 
38. 
The FOI Act at section 4 states that personal information has the same meaning as in the 
Privacy Act 1988. Section 6 of the Privacy Act states that personal information means information 
or an opinion about an identified individual, or an individual who is reasonably identifiable: 
a. 
whether the information or opinion is true or not; and 
b. 
whether the information or opinion is recorded in a material form or not. 
 


 
39. 
Contention 1 claimed that all documents should be exempted on this basis “where there 
might  be  unreasonable  disclosure  of  personal  information”.  However,  Contention 1  did  not 
provide any evidence to support this broad contention. Notwithstanding this, due to the nature 
of  the  information  in  the  documents,  I  have  considered  the  application  of  this  conditional 
exemption to that information. 
40. 
The FOI Guidelines at paragraphs 6.124‐6.179 provide guidance on the application of this 
conditional exemption. 
41. 
This conditional exemption has two threshold tests that must be satisfied. 
42. 
First, there must be a disclosure of personal information about any person (including a 
deceased person). 
43. 
I have examined the documents and find that documents number 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 
11 and 12 in part contain personal information. The information consists of both ‘information’ 
and ‘opinion’ within the meaning of the Privacy Act 1988, including names of people attending 
board meetings, information about their employment as board members, details of their opinions 
about  board  matters,  and  information  and  opinions  held  by  people  about  other  people.  The 
personal  information  includes  information  that  is  in  accordance  with  your  request  as  well  as 
information that is irrelevant material within the meaning of section 22. 
44. 
Second, the disclosure of personal information must be unreasonable. The FOI Guidelines 
at paragraph 6.138 make it clear that this threshold test does not amount to the public interest 
test of subsection 11A(5), which follows later in the decision making process. 
45. 
Subsection 47F(2)  of  the  FOI  Act  sets  out  the  matters  to  which  an  agency  must  have 
regard, and these are also referenced in subsection 27A(2) of the FOI Act and the FOI Guidelines 
at paragraphs 6.140‐6.141. 
46. 
These factors include: 
a. 
the extent to which the information is well known; 
b. 
whether the person to whom the information relates is known to be (or to have 
been) associated with the matters dealt with in the document; 
c. 
the availability of the information from publicly accessible sources; and 
d. 
any other matters that the agency or Minister considers relevant. 
47. 
Applying these considerations first to the ‘information’ about identified individuals: 
a. 
it is reasonable to assume that a limited amount of the information is well known 
(such as information that a person is a board member); however, the context in 
which the information appears may not be well known, and most of the remaining 
information would not be well known; 
 


 
b. 
there is no evidence that the people to whom the information relates are known 
to be (or to have been) associated with the matters dealt with in the documents in 
other than broad and general terms; and 
c. 
some of this information may be available from publicly accessible sources (such 
as  names  of  people),  but  other  information  is  not  likely  to  be  available  from 
publicly  accessible  sources  (such  as  contact  details  or  information  about  their 
employment as board members). 
48. 
Applying these considerations second to the ‘opinion’ about identified individuals: 
a. 
there  is  no  evidence  that  the  opinion  is  well  known,  and  the  context  of  the 
documents suggests that the opinion is not well known; 
b. 
there is no evidence to suggest that the person to whom the opinion information 
relates is known to be (or to have been) associated with the matters dealt with in 
the document; and 
c. 
there  is  no  evidence  to  suggest  that  the  opinion  information  is  available  from 
publicly accessible sources. 
49. 
The FOI Guidelines at paragraph 6.139 quote the Administrative Appeals Tribunal in Re 
Chandra and Minister for Immigration and Ethnic Affairs [1984] AATA 437 at 259 that “whether a 
disclosure  is  ‘unreasonable’  requires  …  a  consideration  of  all  the  circumstances,  including  the 
nature of the information that would be disclosed, the circumstances in which the information 
was  obtained,  the  likelihood  of  the  information  being  information  that  the  person  concerned 
would not wish to have disclosed without consent, and whether the information has any current 
relevance”. 
50. 
Applying the Chandra considerations to these documents: 
a. 
it would be unreasonable to disclose information/opinion of the nature in question 
as this could reasonably be expected to prejudice the protection of an individual’s 
right to privacy; 
b. 
the circumstances in which the information/opinion was obtained do not suggest 
that disclosure would be considered reasonable; 
c. 
it  is  likely  that  that  the  people  concerned  would  not  wish  to  have  the 
information/opinion  disclosed  without  consent,  and  this  is  confirmed  by 
Contention 1; and 
d. 
the information has current relevance, as it dates to 2016, and noting the advice 
from the First Assistant Secretary Arts that a government review is underway. 
51. 
Finally,  the  FOI  Guidelines  at  paragraphs  6.142‐6.148  provide  ‘key  factors’  and  ‘other 
factors’ to which an agency may have regard in determining whether disclosure of a document 
would involve an unreasonable disclosure of personal information, including those arising from 
relevant jurisprudence. 
 


 
52. 
Applying these ‘key factors’ and ‘other factors’: 
a. 
the  documents  contain  third  party  personal  information  that  it  would  be 
unreasonable to disclose; 
b. 
the information has current relevance, as it dates to 2016, and noting the advice 
from the First Assistant Secretary Arts that a government review is underway; 
c. 
disclosure of the information could cause detriment to the people to whom the 
information relates; 
d. 
the Department collected the information in a context of confidentiality and not 
for the purposes of disclosure; and 
e. 
disclosure  of  this  personal  information  is  of  no  demonstrable  relevance  to  the 
affairs of government and is more likely “to do no more than excite or satisfy the 
curiosity  of  people  about  the  person  whose  personal  affairs  were  disclosed” 
(following  Heerey J  in  Colakovski  v  Australian  Telecommunications  Corporation 
(1991) 29 FCR 429, cited in the FOI Guidelines at paragraph 6.144). 
53. 
For the reasons outlined above, disclosure under the FOI Act of documents number 1, 3, 
4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9,  10,  11  and  12  in  part  would  involve  the  unreasonable  disclosure  of  personal 
information about a person. 
54. 
I am therefore satisfied that documents number 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 in part 
are conditionally exempt under section 47F of the FOI Act. 
Application of the public interest test 
55. 
This conditional exemption requires application of the public interest test. 
Public interest factors in favour of disclosure 
56. 
Factors favouring access to the document in the public interest include whether access 
to the document would: 
a. 
promote the objects of the FOI Act (set out at section 3); 
b. 
inform debate on a matter of public importance; 
c. 
promote effective oversight of public expenditure; or 
d. 
allow a person to access his or her own personal information. 
57. 
Applying these considerations to the relevant parts of the documents: 
a. 
disclosure of the personal information in these documents would not promote the 
objects  of  the  FOI  Act,  but  may  undermine  confidence  in  the  operation  of  the 
conditional exemption provisions of the FOI Act; 
 


 
b. 
disclosure of the documents may inform debate on a matter of public importance, 
namely  Internet  governance  and  domain  name  administration,  noting  however 
that there is a review underway into the same matters; 
c. 
disclosure  would  not  promote  effective  oversight  of  public  expenditure,  as  the 
documents do not relate to public expenditure; and 
d. 
disclosure would not allow a person to access his or her own personal information, 
as the documents do not relate to the personal information of the applicant. 
Public interest factors against disclosure 
58. 
The  FOI  Guidelines  at  paragraph 6.22  set  out  a  non‐exhaustive  list  of  factors  against 
disclosure. 
59. 
I have taken into account the following public interest factors against disclosure: 
a. 
disclosure  of  the  information  could  reasonably  be  expected  to  prejudice  the 
protection of an individual’s right to privacy without providing a right to correct 
the information or a right of response to the opinion; 
b. 
disclosure of the information could reasonably be expected to prejudice the fair 
treatment  of  individuals  to  the  extent  that  the  information  is  about 
unsubstantiated  allegations  of  misconduct  or  unlawful,  negligent  or  improper 
conduct; 
c. 
disclosure could reasonably be expected to prejudice the Department’s ability to 
obtain confidential information from the affected third party and generally; and 
d. 
disclosure could reasonably be expected to prejudice the Department’s ability to 
obtain similar information in future from the affected third party and generally. 
Irrelevant factors 
60. 
Subsection 11B(4) of the FOI Act sets out factors that I must not take into account in 
applying the public interest test to the above identified conditional exemptions. 
61. 
I have not taken these irrelevant factors into account in making my decision. 
Balancing public interest factors 
62. 
There is a limited public interest factor in favour of disclosure. 
63. 
On the other hand, there are strong public interest factors against disclosure. 
64. 
Weighing all factors, I find that on balance, disclosure of documents number 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 
7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 in part would not be in the public interest and therefore that the documents 
are exempt under section 47F of the FOI Act. 
65. 
For documents number 1, 3, 4 (attachment), 6 (attachment), 7, 8 and 12 it appears from 
the  context  of  the  documents  that  a  redacted  version  of  these  documents  may  have  been 
 
10 

 
published by the document’s originator. These published versions would have either published 
information,  or  would  have  redacted  the  same  information  as  would  be  conditionally  exempt 
from  disclosure.  As  such,  it  would  be  unnecessary  to  prepare  an  edited  version  of  these 
documents under section 22. 
Section 47G – Public interest conditional exemption – Business 
66. 
I have considered whether disclosure under the FOI Act of documents in accordance with 
your request would disclose information concerning a person in respect of his or her business or 
professional affairs or concerning the business, commercial or financial affairs of an organisation 
or undertaking. If so, the documents may be conditionally exempt documents under section 47G 
of the FOI Act. 
67. 
The FOI Guidelines at paragraphs 6.180‐6.213 provide guidance on the application of this 
conditional exemption. 
68. 
Contention 1 claimed that documents 1, 3, 10 and 11 are exempt from disclosure under 
section 47G  on  the  basis  that  they  “are  internal  and  confidential…Board  documents  which,  if 
released,  would  disclose  business  information  including…commercial  and  financial  affairs,  in 
addition to…internal performance management processes. The release of this information would 
be adverse to the lawful business operations…as it would adversely impact on…future decision‐
making  processes  and  would  reasonably  be  expected  to  prejudice  the  future  supply  of 
information to the Commonwealth”. 
69. 
Contention 1 further claimed that documents 2, 8 and 9 are also exempt from disclosure 
under section 47G on the basis that they “are internal and confidential communications between 
[the third party] and the Department and the release of these documents would reasonably be 
expected to prejudice the future supply of information to the Commonwealth”. 
70. 
Contention 1  further  claimed  that  documents 4,  5,  6,  7  and  10  are  also  exempt  from 
disclosure  under  section 47G  on  the  basis  that  they  “confidential,  internal  Board  documents 
which have been distributed to assist the Board with its decision making. The release of these 
documents  would  also  prejudice  the  future  supply  of  information  to  the  Commonwealth  and 
would unreasonably affect…future lawful business and decision‐making process”. 
71. 
I have examined the documents and find that documents number 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 
10, 11, 12 and 13 contain information concerning a person in respect of his or her business or 
professional affairs or concerning the business, commercial or financial affairs of an organisation 
or undertaking. 
72. 
This  information  is  not  business  information  about  the  applicant  (subsection 47G(3)), 
and does not include trade secrets under section 47 (subsection 47G(2)). 
Unreasonably adversely affect a person, organisation or undertaking 
73. 
A document may be conditionally exempt under section 47G of the FOI Act in a case in 
which  the  disclosure  of  the  information  “would,  or  could  reasonably  be  expected  to, 
unreasonably affect that person adversely in respect of his or her lawful business or professional 
affairs or that organisation or undertaking in respect of its lawful business, commercial or financial 
affairs”. 
 
11 

 
74. 
Paragraph 6.186  of  the  FOI  Guidelines  states  that  the  term  ‘could  reasonably  be 
expected’ refers to an expectation that is based on reason, and that mere assertion or speculative 
possibility is not enough. 
75. 
Contention 1 provided reasons why disclosure of certain documents would unreasonably 
adversely affect a person, organisation or undertaking. These are outlined above. 
76. 
The FOI Guidelines at paragraph 6.191 state that “where disclosure would result in the 
release  of  facts  already  in  the  public  domain,  that  disclosure  would  not  amount  to  an 
unreasonable adverse effect on business affairs”. 
77. 
While redacted versions of similar documents may have been published previously, the 
documents  in  accordance  with  your  request  have  different  provenance,  and  were  provided 
without redaction directly to the Commonwealth for the purpose of the administration of matters 
administered by an agency; namely, Internet governance and domain name administration as a 
component of “postal and telecommunications policies and programmes”. 
78. 
The  FOI  Guidelines  at  paragraph 6.192  state  that  the  “use  of  the  term  ‘business  or 
professional affairs’ distinguishes an individual’s personal or private affairs and an organisation’s 
internal affairs”, and contrast this with information about the internal affairs of an organisation 
including its governance processes. 
79. 
I have examined documents number 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13, and consider 
there is a rational basis to conclude that disclosure of these documents would have an adverse 
effect,  and  that  effect  would  be  unreasonable.  Disclosure  would  result  in  the  release  of 
information  not  already  in  the  public  domain.  Further,  the  documents  relate  to  the  business 
affairs of individuals and organisations named in the documents, and not merely to the internal 
affairs of the organisation and governance processes of those individuals and organisations. 
80. 
Therefore, I find that disclosure under the FOI Act of documents number 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 
7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 would, and could reasonably be expected to, unreasonably adversely 
affect a person, organisation or undertaking. 
Prejudice the future supply of information 
81. 
A document may be conditionally exempt under section 47G of the FOI Act in a case in 
which the disclosure of the information “could reasonably be expected to prejudice the future 
supply of information to the Commonwealth or an agency for the purpose of the administration 
of a law of the Commonwealth or of a Territory or the administration of matters administered by 
an agency”. 
82. 
The FOI Guidelines at paragraph 6.198 state that this limb of the conditional exemption 
comprises two parts. 
83. 
First, there must be a reasonable expectation of a reduction in the quantity or quality of 
business affairs information to the government. 
84. 
Contention 1 provided reasons why disclosure of certain documents could reasonably be 
expected to prejudice the future supply of information to the Commonwealth or an agency for 
 
12 

 
the  purpose  of  the  administration  of  matters  administered  by  an  agency.  These  are  outlined 
above. 
85. 
The  FOI  Guidelines  at  paragraph 6.200  state  that  no  claim  of  prejudice  can  be  made 
where the business information in question can be obtained compulsorily, or is required for some 
benefit or grant. In this case, there is no evidence that the affected third party is under a statutory 
or other legal obligation to provide the documents to the Commonwealth. Therefore, it is open 
to the affected third party to make a claim of prejudice. 
86. 
Second, the reduction must prejudice the operations of the Department. 
87. 
The FOI Guidelines at paragraph 6.201 state that “the agency will usually be best placed 
to identify, and be concerned about the circumstances where the disclosure of documents might 
reasonably be expected to prejudice the future supply of information to it”. 
88. 
I have placed considerable weight on the advice of the First Assistant Secretary Arts that 
disclosure of the documents would prejudice the operations of the Department. In particular, the 
conduct  of  a  current  government  review  would  be  adversely  affected  by  a  reduction  in  the 
quantity or quality of business affairs information to the government. 
89. 
I have examined documents number 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13, and consider 
disclosure  of  these  documents  would  prejudice  the  future  supply  of  information  to  the 
Commonwealth. 
90. 
I am therefore satisfied that documents number 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 
are conditionally exempt under section 47G of the FOI Act. 
Application of the public interest test 
91. 
This conditional exemption requires application of the public interest test. 
Public interest factors in favour of disclosure 
92. 
Factors favouring access to the document in the public interest include whether access 
to the document would: 
a. 
promote the objects of the FOI Act (set out at section 3); 
b. 
inform debate on a matter of public importance; 
c. 
promote effective oversight of public expenditure; 
d. 
allow a person to access his or her own personal information. 
93. 
I have taken into account the following public interest factors in favour of disclosure: 
a. 
disclosure of the business information in these documents would not promote the 
objects  of  the  FOI  Act,  but  may  undermine  confidence  in  the  operation  of  the 
conditional exemption provisions of the FOI Act; 
 
13 

 
b. 
disclosure of the documents may inform debate on a matter of public importance, 
namely  Internet  governance  and  domain  name  administration,  noting  however 
that there is a government review currently underway into the same matters; 
c. 
disclosure  would  not  promote  effective  oversight  of  public  expenditure,  as  the 
documents do not relate to public expenditure; and 
d. 
disclosure would not allow a person to access his or her own personal information, 
as the documents do not relate to the personal information of the applicant. 
Public interest factors against disclosure 
94. 
The  FOI  Guidelines  at  paragraph 6.22  set  out  a  non‐exhaustive  list  of  factors  against 
disclosure. 
95. 
I have taken into account the following public interest factors against disclosure: 
a. 
disclosure could reasonably be expected to prejudice the Department’s ability to 
obtain confidential information from the affected third party and generally; 
b. 
disclosure could reasonably be expected to prejudice the Department’s ability to 
obtain similar information in future from the affected third party and generally; 
c. 
disclosure could reasonably be expected to prejudice the Department’s ability to 
obtain information for a current government review into Internet governance and 
domain name administration; and 
d. 
disclosure could reasonably be expected to harm the interests of an individual or 
group of individuals named in the documents. 
Irrelevant factors 
96. 
Subsection 11B(4) of the FOI Act sets out factors that I must not take into account in 
applying the public interest test to the above identified conditional exemptions. 
97. 
I have not taken these irrelevant factors into account in making my decision. 
Balancing public interest factors 
98. 
There is a limited public interest factor in favour of disclosure. 
99. 
On the other hand, there are strong public interest factors against disclosure. 
100. 
Weighing all factors, I find that on balance, disclosure would not be in the public interest 
and therefore that the documents are exempt under section 47G of the FOI Act. 
101. 
For documents number 1, 3, 4 (attachment), 6 (attachment), 7, 8 and 12 it appears from 
the  context  of  the  documents  that  a  redacted  version  of  these  documents  may  have  been 
published by the document’s originator. These published versions would have either published 
information,  or  would  have  redacted  the  same  information  as  would  be  conditionally  exempt 
 
14 

 
from  disclosure.  As  such,  it  would  be  unnecessary  to  prepare  an  edited  version  of  these 
documents under section 22. 
F. 
CHARGE 
102. 
The Australian Information Commissioner’s fact sheet 7 states that “if you paid a deposit 
and the agency decides not to grant you access to any document, you are not entitled to a refund 
of the deposit”. 
G. 
REVIEW RIGHTS 
103. 
This  decision  may  be  subject  to  review  under  section 54,  section 54A,  section 54L  or 
section 54M  of  the  FOI  Act.  I have  attached  the  Office  of  the  Australian  Information 
Commissioner’s FOI fact sheet 12: Your review rights
104. 
I have also directed that a copy of this decision, with your details redacted, is provided 
to the affected third party. 
Yours sincerely 
 
Legal Director 
Office of the General Counsel 
Position Number 112404 
 
Attachment A 
Schedule of Documents 
Attachment B 
FOI fact sheet 12: Your review rights 
 
15