This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Systems integrator panel for WPIT'.



If not delivered return to PO Box 7820 Canberra BC ACT 2610 
 
 
31 May 2018 
 
 
Our reference:  LEX 34976 
 
 
 
Mr David Brown 
 
 
Only by email: [FOI #4380 email]  
 
 
Dear Mr Brown 
 
Decision on your Freedom of Information request 
 
I refer to your request, dated 16 February 2018 and received by the Department of Human 
Services (department) on that same date, for access under the Freedom of Information Act 
1982 
(FOI Act) to the following: 
 '…all the documents published on AusTender website under RFT 1000401959 in 
relation to the Systems integrator panel for the WPIT program. The RFT was issued 
on 1 August 2016.'  
My decision 
The department holds 37 documents (totalling 400 pages) that relate to your request. 
I have decided that:  
  the documents are conditionally exempt, in full, under section 47D of the FOI Act, on 
the basis that disclosure of the documents would have a substantial adverse effect on 
the financial interests of the department, and is not in the public interest; and 
  parts of the documents are conditionally exempt, under section 47G(1)(a) of the 
FOI Act, on the basis that they contain information concerning the business, 
commercial or financial affairs of one or more organisations, the disclosure of which 
would or could reasonably be expected to unreasonably affect that organisation in 
respect of its lawful business, commercial or financial affairs, and is not in the public 
interest. 
Please see the schedule at Attachment A to this letter for a list of the documents and the 
reasons for my decision, including the relevant sections of the FOI Act. 
Charges 
Regulation 3 of the Freedom of Information (Charges) Regulations 1982 (Charges 
Regulations
) provides that an agency has a discretion to impose a charge for providing 
PAGE 1 OF 10 

 
access to a document. Regulations 9 and 10 of the Charges Regulations set out how the 
charges are to be calculated. 
 
Section 29 of the FOI Act sets out the process for an agency to follow where it has decided 
to impose charges. Paragraph 4.63 of the guidelines issued by the Australian Information 
Commissioner under section 93A of the FOI Act (Guidelines) provide that, after making a 
decision on a request where a charge was estimated, the department is required to calculate 
the final charges, in accordance with the Charges Regulations. 
 
On 7 March 2018, the department notified you of its preliminary estimate of charges to 
process your request, in the amount of $465.55 and calculated in accordance with regulation 
9 of the Charges Regulations. 
On 8 March 2018, you requested that the department reconsider the preliminary estimate. 
On 9 April 2018, the department notified you that it had decided to reduce the amount of 
charges to process your request to $232.78. 
On 20 April 2018, the department received your payment of $232.78.  
 
I have considered the actual cost of processing your request, for the purpose of considering 
whether to adjust the amount of the charge under regulation 10 of the Charges Regulations.  
  
I have decided that the amount of $232.78 is a fair and accurate reflection of the time taken 
to process your request. On this basis, I have decided not to adjust the assessment of 
charges (paid by you), and have fixed the charge under regulation 10 of the Charges 
Regulations. 
You can ask for a review of my decision 
If you disagree with any part of my decision, you can ask for a review. There are two ways 
you can do this. You can ask for an internal review from within the department, or an external 
review by the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner. You do not have to pay for 
reviews of decisions. See Attachment B for more information about how arrange a review.  
Further assistance 
If you have any questions please email [email address]. 
 
Yours sincerely 
 
 
Isabella 
Authorised FOI Decision Maker 
Freedom of Information Team 
FOI and Litigation Branch | Legal Services Division  
Department of Human Services 
PAGE 2 OF 10 
 
Department of Human Services 


If not delivered return to PO Box 7820 Canberra BC ACT 2610 
Attachment A 
LIST OF DOCUMENTS 
BROWN, David - LEX 34976 
 
 
Doc 
Pages 
Date 
Description 
Decision 
Exemption 
Comments 
No. 
 
1-37 
1-400 
Various 
Documents formerly available 
Exempt in full 
s 47D 
Pages 1-400: contain information, the disclosure of which 
on the AusTender website 
 
 
would have a substantial adverse effect on the financial 
under RFT 1000401959 
 
 
interests of the Commonwealth or the department, and is 
Request for Tender for the 
 
 
not in the public interest. 
Procurement of a Systems 
Exempt in part  s 47G(1)(a) 
 
Integrator Panel 
Various: contain information concerning the business, 
commercial or financial affairs of one or more 
organisations, the disclosure of which would or could 
reasonably be expected to unreasonably affect that 
organisation in respect of its lawful business, commercial 
or financial affairs, and is not in the public interest. 
 
 
 
PAGE 3 OF 10 



If not delivered return to PO Box 7820 Canberra BC ACT 2610 
 
 
ATTACHMENT A 
REASONS FOR DECISION 
What you requested 
On 16 February 2018, you requested access, under the FOI Act, to documents in the 
following terms: 
‘I would like to obtain all the documents published on AusTender website under RFT 
1000401959 in relation to the Systems integrator panel for the WPIT program. The 
RFT was issued on 1 August 2016.’ 
On 19 February 2018, the department acknowledged your request. 
What I took into account 
In reaching my decision I took into account: 
  your request dated 16 February 2018; 
  other correspondence between the department and you in relation to your request; 
  the documents that fall within the scope of your request; 
  consultation with third parties about their business information contained in the 
documents; 
  consultations with departmental officers about: 
o  the nature of the documents; 
o  the department's operating environment and functions; 
  the FOI Act and the Guidelines.  
 
Reasons for my decision 

I am authorised to make decisions under section 23(1) of the FOI Act. 
I have decided that the documents you have requested are exempt under the FOI Act, as 
identified in the Schedule.  My findings of fact and reasons for deciding that the exemptions 
apply to those documents are discussed below.  
Section 47D of the FOI Act 
I have decided that the exemption in section 47D of the FOI Act applies to all the documents 
within the scope of your request. 
Section 47D of the FOI Act provides: 
‘A document is conditionally exempt if its disclosure under this Act would have a 
substantial adverse effect on the financial or property interests of the Commonwealth 
or of an agency.’ 
Paragraph 6.90 of the Guidelines provides: 
PAGE 4 OF 10 

 
‘The financial or property interests of the Commonwealth or an agency may relate to 
assets, expenditure or revenue-generating activities.’ 
I consider that the information contained within the documents you have requested concerns 
the financial interests of the Commonwealth as represented by the department, on the basis 
that it relates to expenditure activities, namely the procurement of systems integrator 
services to support the delivery of the department’s Welfare Payment Infrastructure 
Transformation Programme (WPIT Programme).  
A substantial adverse effect  
Paragraph 6.92 of the Guidelines provides: 
‘A substantial adverse effect may be indirect. For example, where disclosure of 
documents would provide the criteria by which an agency is to assess tenders, the 
agency’s financial interest in seeking to obtain best value for money through a 
competitive tendering process may be compromised.’ 
In David Miles Connolly and Department of Finance [1994] AATA 167 (Connolly), the 
Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) considered the meaning of ‘substantial’ in the context 
of this exemption, and held that: 
‘There must be a degree of gravity before this exemption can be made out … the 
effect must be "serious" or "significant" ... Normally a value judgment has to be made 
as to whether an adverse effect is or is not substantial when considering 
exemptions…’  
In Connolly, Deputy President McMahon held that disclosure of documents regarding tenders 
and expressions of interest for certain services (in that matter, disposal of uranium 
stockpiles) would result in a substantial adverse effect on the Commonwealth’s financial or 
property interests, on the basis that it would prejudice the Commonwealth’s ability to develop 
and/or implement its strategy to dispose of its uranium stockpile so as to maximise the return 
to the taxpayer and ensure an orderly market. Deputy President McMahon stated: 
‘…I would have to find that access to the remaining documents would be virtual 
disclosure of the Commonwealth's strategy for selling that 4 million lbs in a thin, 
confidential and sensitive market and that this would inevitably affect the general spot 
price and the price which the Commonwealth might reasonably be expected to 
achieve if the present confidential strategy is maintained.’    
I consider that disclosure of the documents you have requested would have a substantial 
adverse effect on the Commonwealth’s financial interests. This is because the documents 
within the scope of your request include the criteria by which the department was to assess 
tenders for this particular Systems Integrator Panel. Although this particular tender has 
already been finalised, the WPIT programme is ongoing. It is reasonable to assume that the 
department may undertake further procurement activities relating to the WPIT programme, 
which would be compromised if the documents you have requested were disclosed.  
I also note that Connolly is analogous to the current request, in that disclosure of the 
information contained in the documents you have requested would effectively disclose the 
department’s strategy for obtaining certain services to support the implementation of the 
WPIT programme. The department is a significant purchaser of a wide range of IT services in 
a small market, such that there would be an immediate, direct and significant impact if the 
department’s approach to market were disclosed.  
PAGE 5 OF 10 
 
Department of Human Services 

 
For the reasons given above, I consider that the documents are conditionally exempt under 
section 47D of the FOI Act. 
Public interest considerations 
When weighing up the public interest for and against disclosure under section 11A(5) of the 
FOI Act, I have taken into account relevant factors in favour of disclosure. In particular, I 
have considered the extent to which disclosure would promote the objects of the FOI Act and 
promote effective oversight of public expenditure. 
I have also considered the relevant factors weighing against disclosure, indicating that 
access would be contrary to the public interest. In particular, I have considered the extent to 
which disclosure could reasonably be expected to: 
  prejudice the competitive commercial activities of the department; and 
  harm the interests of an individual or group of individuals. 
Based on these factors, I have decided that the public interest in disclosing the information in 
the above-mentioned documents is outweighed by the public interest against disclosure. 
I have not taken into account any of the irrelevant factors set out in section 11B(4) of the FOI 
Act in making this decision. 
Conclusion 
In summary, I am satisfied that the documents are conditionally exempt under section 47D of 
the FOI Act. Furthermore I have decided that, on balance, it would be contrary to the public 
interest to release this information. Accordingly, I have decided not to release the documents 
to you. 
 
Section 47G of the FOI Act - unreasonable disclosure of information - business 
I consider that parts of the documents are conditionally exempt, in full, under 
section 47G(1)(a) of the FOI Act.  
 
Section 47G of the FOI Act provides: 
 
‘(1)  A document is conditionally exempt if its disclosure under this Act would disclose 
information concerning a person in respect of his or her business or professional 
affairs or concerning the business, commercial or financial affairs of an 
organisation or undertaking, in a case in which the disclosure of the information:  
(a) 
would, or could reasonably be expected to, unreasonably affect that person 
adversely in respect of his or her lawful business or professional affairs or 
that organisation or undertaking in respect of its lawful business, 
commercial or financial affairs’. 
 
Paragraph 6.192 of the Guidelines provides:  
 
‘The use of the term ‘business or professional affairs’ distinguishes an individual’s 
personal or professional affairs and an organisation’s internal affairs. The term 
‘business affairs’ has been interpreted to mean ‘the totality of the money-making 
affairs of an organisation or undertaking as distinct from its private or internal affairs.’ 
 
PAGE 6 OF 10 
 
Department of Human Services 

 
The documents within the scope of your request contain information regarding: 
 
  certain commercial arrangements between the department and organisations; and 
  certain product offerings or services of organisations.  
Therefore, this information is ‘information about the business, commercial or financial affairs 
of organisations’ within the meaning of section 47G(1) of the FOI Act.  
 
Whether disclosure is 'unreasonable' 
 
In addition to the factors specified in section 47G(1) of the FOI Act, paragraph 6.187 of the 
Guidelines provides:  
 
‘The presence of ‘unreasonably’ in s 47G(1) implies a need to balance public and 
private interests, but this does not amount to the public interest test of s 11A(5) which 
follows later in the decision process. It is possible that the decision maker may need 
to consider one or more factors twice, once to determine if a projected effect is 
unreasonable and again in assessing the public interest balance. This is inherent in 
the structure of the business information exemption’.  
 
I am satisfied that the disclosure of this business information would be unreasonable for the 
following reasons: 
  it relates to aspects of one or more organisation’s business and professional affairs; 
  the information is private and not available in full or in part from publicly-accessible 
sources; and  
  the information was included in the documents for the purpose of a tender exercise, 
which has now concluded and which is no longer accessible on the Austender 
website as a matter of government policy. 
On this basis, I have decided that the documents containing business information are 
conditionally exempt under section 47G(1) of the FOI Act. 
Public interest considerations 
When weighing up the public interest for and against disclosure under section 11A(5) of the 
FOI Act, I have taken into account relevant factors in favour of disclosure. In particular, I 
have considered the extent to which disclosure would promote the objects of the FOI Act and 
promote effective oversight of public expenditure. 
I have also considered the following factors weighing against disclosure, indicating that 
access to the information would be contrary to the public interest, on the basis that: 
 
  the information relates to aspects of the lawful business, commercial or financial 
affairs of one or more organisations; 
  disclosure would reveal confidential information; 
  disclosure of the information may inhibit the conduct of future negotiations for 
professional services by the department and/or the organisations; and  
PAGE 7 OF 10 
 
Department of Human Services 

 
  the information is private and not available in full or in part from 
publicly-accessible sources. 
I have decided that the public interest in disclosing the business information in the 
documents within the scope of your request is outweighed by the public interest against 
disclosure. 
Conclusion 
In summary, I am satisfied that parts of the documents are conditionally exempt under 
section 47G(1)(a) of the FOI Act, on the basis that they contain information concerning the 
lawful business, commercial or financial affairs of organisations which is unreasonable to 
disclose. I have decided that, on balance, it would be contrary to the public interest to release 
this information.  
Summary of my decision 
In conclusion, I have decided to refuse access to all 37 documents within scope of this 
request.  
I have decided that:  
  the documents are conditionally exempt, in full, under section 47D of the FOI Act, on 
the basis that disclosure of the documents would have a substantial adverse effect on 
the financial interests of the department, and is not in the public interest; and 
  parts of the documents are conditionally exempt, under section 47G(1)(a) of the 
FOI Act, on the basis that they contain information concerning the business, 
commercial or financial affairs of one or more organisations, the disclosure of which 
would or could reasonably be expected to unreasonably affect that organisation in 
respect of its lawful business, commercial or financial affairs, and is not in the public 
interest. 
PAGE 8 OF 10 
 
Department of Human Services 



If not delivered return to PO Box 7820 Canberra BC ACT 2610 
 
Attachment B 
 
 

INFORMATION ON RIGHTS OF REVIEW 
 
FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT 1982 
 
Asking for a full explanation of a Freedom of Information decision 

Before you ask for a formal review of a FOI decision, you can contact us to discuss your 
request. We will explain the decision to you. This gives you a chance to correct 
misunderstandings.  
Asking for a formal review of a Freedom of Information decision 
If you still believe a decision is incorrect, the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) 
gives you the right to apply for a review of the decision. Under sections 54 and 54L of the 
FOI Act, you can apply for a review of an FOI decision by: 
1.  an Internal Review Officer in the Department of Human Services (the department); 
and/or 
2.  the Australian Information Commissioner. 
Note 1: There are no fees for these reviews. 
Applying for an internal review by an Internal Review Officer 
If you apply for internal review, a different decision maker to the departmental delegate who 
made the original decision will carry out the review. The Internal Review Officer will consider 
all aspects of the original decision and decide whether it should change. An application for 
internal review must be: 
 
made in writing 
  made within 30 days of receiving this letter 
  sent to the address at the top of the first page of this letter. 
Note 2: You do not need to fill in a form. However, it is a good idea to set out any relevant 
submissions you would like the Internal Review Officer to further consider, and your reasons 
for disagreeing with the decision.  
Applying for external review by the Australian Information Commissioner 
If you do not agree with the original decision or the internal review decision, you can ask the 
Australian Information Commissioner to review the decision.  
If you do not receive a decision from an Internal Review Officer in the department within 30 
days of applying, you can ask the Australian Information Commissioner for a review of the 
original FOI decision.  
You will have 60 days to apply in writing for a review by the Australian Information 
Commissioner.  
PAGE 9 OF 10 

 
You can lodge your application
Online: 
www.oaic.gov.au   
Post:    
Australian Information Commissioner 
 
 
GPO Box 5218 
SYDNEY NSW 2001  
Email:   
[email address] 
 
Note 3: The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner generally prefers FOI 
applicants to seek internal review before applying for external review by the Australian 
Information Commissioner. 
Important: 
  If you are applying online, the application form the 'Merits Review Form' is available at 
www.oaic.gov.au.  
  If you have one, you should include with your application a copy of the Department of 
Human Services' decision on your FOI request  
  Include your contact details 
  Set out your reasons for objecting to the department's decision. 
Complaints to the Information Commissioner and Commonwealth Ombudsman  
Australian Information Commissioner 
 
You may complain to the Australian Information Commissioner concerning action taken by 
an agency in the exercise of powers or the performance of functions under the FOI Act. 
There is no fee for making a complaint. A complaint to the Australian Information 
Commissioner must be made in writing. The Australian Information Commissioner's contact 
details are: 
 
Telephone:      1300 363 992 
Website:          www.oaic.gov.au  
 
Commonwealth Ombudsman 
 
You may also complain to the Commonwealth Ombudsman concerning action taken by an 
agency in the exercise of powers or the performance of functions under the FOI Act. There is 
no fee for making a complaint. A complaint to the Commonwealth Ombudsman may be 
made in person, by telephone or in writing. The Commonwealth Ombudsman's contact 
details are: 
 
Phone:             1300 362 072 
Website:          www.ombudsman.gov.au 
 
The Commonwealth Ombudsman generally prefers applicants to seek review before 
complaining about a decision. 
 
PAGE 10 OF 10 
 
Department of Human Services