This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Documents related to the destruction of plant specimens.'.


FOI 2017/18-54 Document 1
June 2017 
Action Plan (Herbarium Samples through Mail pathway) 
Background: 
In April 2017, the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources became aware that there were two instances of destruction of Herbarium 
Specimens – one in Brisbane, one in Sydney. Both imports came through the mail pathway and were identified as having incomplete or nil import 
documentation. 
A thorough internal review of both incidents by senior management identified improvements to avoid future reoccurrence. The review findings 
highlighted a number of process improvements and, importantly, confirmed compliance of the department’s work instructions with relevant 
legislation. 
Actions comprise themes involving staff training, process improvement and clarifying BICON conditions.  The action below summarises the actions 
and timeframe for implementation. 
T +61 2 6272 3933 
18 Marcus Clarke Street 
GPO Box 858 
agriculture.gov.au 
F +61 2 6272 5161 
Canberra City ACT 2601 
Canberra ACT 2601 
ABN 24 113 085 695 

ACTION PLAN  
Issue 
Activity 
Timeframe 
Responsibility 
Outcome 
1.  Training: 
1. Staff undertake refresher training in the following modules with 
6 months 
Directors mail 
 
 
an emphasis on handling botanical collections. 
 
program and service 
 
delivery  
-
 
 
Introduction to Mail Operations eLearning course 
-  Mail assessment training course (classroom training 
followed by online knowledge assessment) 
-  Mail assessment and inspection national job card. 
These activities will all be registered in LearnHub 
 
2. Process 
1.  Level of approval for disposal of commodities such as Herbarium  Immediate 
Service Delivery  
Completed 
improvement 
specimens, or other items of like intrinsic value, to be assigned to 
 
Service Delivery  
 
 
Assistant Director. 
 
 
 
 
2.  Instruction to gateway facilities to segregate goods awaiting 
 
Service Delivery  
 
documentation attesting to compliance from those goods routinely 
Immediate 
 
Completed 
awaiting disposal. 
 
Service Delivery  
 
 
 
3 months 
3. Confirmation of practice regarding goods arriving without a 
 
permit. 
 
 
1 month 
4. Implementation of Operational Staff Notice (OSN) to clarify 
process for destruction of goods.   
 


3.  BICON case 
1.  Review BICON conditions to  
3  months 
Plant imports 
 
 
•  specify preferred commercial pathway (air cargo) for 
conveyance of botanical collections 
•  clearly express methods of disposal for goods forfeited to 
the Commonwealth. 
•  Clearly express requirements for sender to more clearly 
identify botanical collections and declared value on 
packaging 
 
 




Case: Herbarium specimens Effective: 11 Mar 2017 to 01 Apr 2017 
Fully preserved and identified — Not knowingly infected — Vascular plants (Nil Import Permit Required
https://bicon.agriculture.gov.au/BiconWeb4.0/ImportConditions/Conditions/CasePathwaySection?EvaluatableElementId=1987
04&Path=UNDEFINED&UserContext=External&EvaluationStateId=3818a83b‐6232‐4fb1‐8249‐
f9dfbde823fd&caseElementPk=610790&PathwayPk=226 
 
 
‐ Subsequently the department could not ascertain whether the herbarium specimens required a permit or not  
 
‐ The officer that initially stored the package in our detained goods area remembers the box as approximately 50cm 
x 30cm x 5cm in volume, wrapped in brown paper with documents (in French) affixed to the outside. The officer has 
no recollection of it having “ATTENTION QUARANTINE” written on the package (This is a required import condition 
for Herbarium Specimens not requiring an Import Permit) but does recall the customs declaration on the package 
stating an estimated value of $2.00  
 
‐ The goods were subsequently opened by Australia Post and inspected by a Biosecurity Officer who issued a  Mail 
and Passenger System (MAPS) entry, reference no: QM17000010. The goods were secured and a MAPS direction 
was mailed to the client (Queensland Herbarium) outlining shortfalls with adherence to import conditions. This 
direction included clarification that unless arrangements were made for the goods to be exported to the sender, or 
additional information was provided demonstrating compliance with import conditions within 30 days of the notice, 
that the goods would be forfeited to the Commonwealth in accordance with s628 of the Biosecurity Act 2015. 
 
 
6 January 2017 (Friday) 
 
‐ Queensland Herbarium contacted the departmental detained goods Office (via telephone).  During this call, the 
client identified that they had a permit but were not aware that they were being sent this specimen. Furthermore 
the client indicated that they would send through the required documents for release (i.e. Import Permit and 
Supplier Declaration). 
 
‐ Despite this conversation, nil correspondence was received by the department until Friday 3 March 2017 (past the 
legislated 30 day timeframe). The client at this stage brought to the department’s  attention that they attempted to 
contact the Detained Goods Office via email on Friday 6 January 2017, however that they mistyped the email 
address and subsequently the department did not receive the required documentation. 
 
3 March 2017 (Friday) 
 
‐ Queensland Herbarium contacted the detained goods office (via telephone). The Biosecurity Officer once again 
requested the appropriate documentation via email. An email was then send to the department with the Import 
Permit (but lacking the required supporting documentation). The Biosecurity Officer then responded requesting the 
outstanding import documentation. 
 
21 March 2017 (Tuesday) 
 
‐ The department conducted a routine destruction of goods process, that is undertaken for goods that have been 
forfeited to the Commonwealth. This process involves verifying that goods are of low value, in this instance declared 
as $2.00  
 
‐ The box containing the herbarium specimens were part of this process given that they had been held by the 
department since early January, a timeframe well past the initial 30 day allowance for provision of information. 
 
‐ Subsequently the goods were picked up by an approved waste handling provider for destruction. 
 
23 March 2017 (Thursday) 
 
2

‐ Queensland Herbarium contacted the departmental detained goods office with the appropriate paperwork to 
comply with import conditions outlined in MAPS direction QM17000010 dated 4 January 2017. 
 
29 March 2017 (Wednesday) 
 
‐ After investigations by the department, Queensland Herbarium were contacted by a Biosecurity Officer and 
informed that goods had been sent to waste provider for destruction. 
 
31 March 2017 (Friday) 
 
‐ The department sought cooperation from the waste handling provider to source the bins collected from the 
Brisbane Gateway Facility 
 
3 April 2017 (Monday) 
 
‐ The department contacted Queensland Herbarium and confirmed that despite efforts to source the bins over the 
weekend, that the box containing the specimens had in fact been incinerated by the approved waste handling 
provider. 
 
‐ The department has instigated the following corrective actions: 
  The officer that disposed of the goods has been counselled 
 
  A separate storage area has been assigned for “Goods secured pending further information” 
 
  MAPS paperwork is affixed to all detained goods and HOLD labels are being used with additional notation. 
 
  Detained goods are now being held for at least 35 days past last communication (instead of 35 days after 
importation (as per legislative requirements)). 
 
  2 x officers are being used for all disposals, adding an additional layer of verification. MAPS is accessed and 
comments verified prior to disposal. 
 
  All mail officers were informed of these changes. 
 
Further control measures that are being introduced: 
 
  A simplified email alias has been created ([email address]) and will be provided on all written 
correspondence and directions sent to clients. This is to avoid confusion and typographical errors for our 
clients. The standard email address ([email address]) is more complex and leads to confusion. 
Both email addresses are active and direct emails into the same inbox.  
 
  An email auto‐reply is being developed to provide further information to our clients and to inform them of 
their email delivery/acceptance. 
 
 
 
3


FOI2017/18-54 Document 3
Media statement 
Date Month 2017 
A reminder of the importance of Australia’s biosecurity 
import conditions 
The recent media coverage of the destruction of herbaria specimens 
being imported by the Queensland Herbarium serves as a timely 
reminder of the importance of Australia’s biosecurity requirements. 
Plant and animal materials could harbour exotic pests and diseases that 
could damage Australia’s unique flora and fauna, our communities and 
our $59 billion agricultural industries. 
The department acknowledges the significance of these specimens as a 
botanical reference collection, and their destruction was an unfortunate 
and regrettable outcome—however, it is one that could easily have been 
avoided had the package been sent with the required import 
documentation. 
To protect Australia from potentially devastating biosecurity risks, we 
have special requirements that apply to the import of any items 
containing plant or animal materials. 
Members of the public should avoid bringing plant or animal materials in 
through the mail, as there are biosecurity requirements that must be 
met. 
However, special items—like museum specimens or other cultural and 
historical artefacts—need special handling, and the department 
facilitates the safe importation of many such items each year. 
In the case of herbarium specimens, we require that they are free from 
pests, have a declaration to tell us what they are and are labelled so we 
can detect them amongst the vast numbers of mail items our Biosecurity 
Officers screen every day. 
In the case of the specimens destined for the Queensland Herbarium, 
there was no prior notification of the package’s arrival or its significance, 
and it was sent in the regular mail, wrapped in nondescript brown paper, 
with a declared value of $2 and no special markings to indicate its 
importance. 
This meant that there was nothing to distinguish it as unique amongst 
the 138 million mail items our Biosecurity Officers screen every year—
until one of our sniffer dogs identified it as containing items that could 
pose a potential biosecurity risk. 
T +61 2 6272 3232 
18 Marcus Clarke Street 
GPO Box 858 
agriculture.gov.au 
 E [email address]  Canberra City ACT 2601 
Canberra City ACT 2601 
@DeptAgNews 
ABN 24 113 085 695  

Media statement 
Date Month 2017 
 
Import conditions for herbarium specimens are important in order to 
protect Australia’s unique flora and fauna, our communities and our 
$59 billion agricultural industries from potentially devastating exotic 
pests and diseases. 
The department has met with representatives from Managers of the 
Australasian Herbarium Collections to review this incident and assist 
herbaria representatives in understanding and complying with 
Australia’s import conditions. 
The department is also undertaking a comprehensive review of this 
incident and has revised processes to minimise the risk of a re-
occurance. 
This is a timely reminder that when sending items through the mail, 
goods which may present a biosecurity risk must comply with Australian 
import conditions. Breaching Australian biosecurity laws can result in 
penalties including fines and prosecution. 
To find out more, visit agriculture.gov.au/travelling 
Approvals 
Line area approval 
Lyn O’Connell, Nico Padovan 
Date 
12/05/17 
Media 
Bronwyn Hill 
Date 
12/05/17 
 
T +61 2 6272 3232 
18 Marcus Clarke Street 
GPO Box 858 
agriculture.gov.au 
 E media@agriculture,gov.au  Canberra City ACT 2601 
Canberra City ACT 2601 
@DeptAgNews 
ABN 24 113 085 695