Coal seam gas locations harm to the general public

Kieran made this Freedom of Information request to National Health and Medical Research Council

This request has been withdrawn by the person who made it. There may be an explanation in the correspondence below.

From: Kieran

Delivered

Dear National Health and Medical Research Council,

With the health risks associated with Coal seam gas, can you tell me

1, Why AGL were given permission to drill 11 coal seam gas wells (of their 66 approved applications) in high volume residential locations, with the known health risks

2, Why is Coal seam gas seen to be not harmful, i believe one of the locations is 500 meters from a school

3, Why are wind turbines seen to be harmful to the public as they cannot be less than 2kms (in the UK, is this the case in Australia too, or is the distance greater?

4, With the damage done to the water tables and peoples health by CSG in the USA, why is this being ignored here

5, Why will innocent people suffer, when we already know the outcome of this horrible industry?

http://reneweconomy.com.au/2012/mixed-gr...

Yours faithfully,

Kieran

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From: NHMRC FOI
National Health and Medical Research Council

SEC=UNCLASSIFIED
 
Dear Kieran,
 
I refer to your request below.  
 
Please note that in order for a request under the FOI Act to be valid, it
must (amongst other things) be a request for documents, and must provide
enough information about the documents as is reasonably necessary to
enable the agency to identify the documents.
 
Your request below does not provide sufficient information for NHMRC to be
able to identify the documents you seek and is therefore not a valid FOI
request.  If you wish to make an FOI request, I suggest you consider the
requirements for a valid FOI request, available on NHMRC's FOI page along
with other information about FOI,  at
[1]http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/about/freedom-in...
 
Further, to assist you to decide if you wish to proceed with an FOI
request to NHMRC, please note that NHMRC has not conducted any reviews of
the evidence in relation to potential health effects of coal seam gas.  
You may wish to make an FOI request of the Department of Sustainability,
Environment, Water, Population and Communities, for coal seam gas-related
documents. 
 
In relation to question 3 about wind farms, you may wish to have a look at
NHMRC's web page information on wind farms before making an FOI request
for documents relating to wind farms:
[2]http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/your-health/wind...
 
Please note that NHMRC is not a regulator and does not have power to issue
rules or laws about where wind farms should be sited.  Those are issues
for State and Territory, and local, governments, so your request may be
better directed to the relevant State/Territory or local government
agencies in your area of interest.  NHMRC's role in relation to wind farms
is limited to inquiring into and  issuing advice to the community on the
evidence regarding  wind farms and their potential health effects.
 
Regards,
Sarah Todd
For the NHMRC FOI Coordinator
 

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From: Kieran

Delivered

Dear National Health and Medical Research Council,

Thanks for your prompt reply, i will withdraw this request and do a little more research for specific documents.

Yours faithfully,

Kieran

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From: Kieran

Delivered

Dear National Health and Medical Research Council,

FOI request withdrawn

Yours faithfully,

Kieran

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Kieran left an annotation ()

Issue withdrawn

KO

Ignore this:
Meditation is a practice in which an individual trains the mind and/or induces a mode of consciousness to realize some benefit,[1] although it can be argued that meditation is a goal in and of itself.[2]

The term meditation refers to a broad variety of practices (much like the term sports), which range from techniques designed to promote relaxation, contacting spiritual guides, building internal energy (chi, ki, prana, etc.), receiving psychic visions, getting closer to God, seeing past lives, taking astral journeys, and so forth, to more technical exercises targeted at developing compassion,[3] love, patience, generosity, forgiveness and more far-reaching goals such as effortlessly sustained single-pointed concentration,[4] single-pointed analysis,[5] and an indestructible sense of well-being while engaging in any and all of life's activities. Thus, it is essential to be specific about the type of meditation practice under investigation.

Failure to make such distinctions would be akin to the use of the word 'sport' to refer to all sports as if they were essentially the same. For example, the overly generic description of meditation as a mere relaxation technique becomes problematic when one attends to the details of many practices. In contrast, we should think about the term "Meditation" as referring to several neighborhoods of New Age practices, shamanistic lucid dreaming and astral journeying, theistic-concentration meditations (clinging to god, Gnosis), contemplation, visualization, hypnotherapy, aromatherapy, chakra clearing, kundalini, breathing exercises, training of single-pointed attention, training in mindfulness, training in single-pointed analysis, vision questing, chi building exercises, and so on, developed for various ends."[6][7]

Meditation often involves an internal effort to self-regulate the mind in some way. It may be done sitting, or in an active way, for instance Buddhist monks involve awareness in their day-to-day activities as a form of mind-training. Prayer beads or other ritual objects are commonly used during meditation in order to keep track of or remind the practitioner about some aspect of the training. Meditation may involve generating an emotional state for the purpose of analyzing that state — such as anger, hatred, etc. — or cultivating particular mental response to various phenomena, such as compassion.

The term "meditation" can refer to the state itself, as well as to practices or techniques employed to cultivate the state.[8] In brief, there are dozens of specific styles of meditation practice;[7] the word meditation may carry different meanings in different contexts. Meditation has been practiced since antiquity as a component of numerous religious traditions and beliefs.

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From: Kieran

Delivered

This should not be sent

Ignore this if you see it

This issue will be withdrawn, please ignore

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From: Kieran

Delivered

Dear NHMRC FOI,

Case closed, cheers

Yours sincerely,

Kieran

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